Handlebar stem corroded in steerer tube

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Peter Devine, Feb 27, 2003.

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  1. Peter Devine

    Peter Devine Guest

    Hi,

    Anyone got any ideas for a long-standing problem. For the last two years I just haven't been able to
    budge the handlebar stem or its 'spreader' nut. I've tried all the usual techniques plus penetrating
    oil and using a puller from below - to no avail. I forsee a problem one day at an airport - so far
    I've got away without twisting the handlebars.

    Any ideas welcome - I'm quite prepared to destroy the stem but obviously don't want to damage
    the frame.

    Thanks

    Peter
     
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  2. Peter Devine

    Peter Devine Guest

    Having posted this query I took a look at the FAQ list and read the suggestions and comments there.
    It seems this is one for the specialist bike shop and probably requires a 'bore-out' unless anyone
    has any better ideas.

    Peter

    "Peter Devine" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi,
    >
    > Anyone got any ideas for a long-standing problem. For the last two years
    I
    > just haven't been able to budge the handlebar stem or its 'spreader' nut. I've tried all the usual
    > techniques plus penetrating oil and using a
    puller
    > from below - to no avail. I forsee a problem one day at an airport - so
    far
    > I've got away without twisting the handlebars.
    >
    > Any ideas welcome - I'm quite prepared to destroy the stem but obviously don't want to damage
    > the frame.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Peter
     
  3. > Any ideas welcome - I'm quite prepared to destroy the stem but obviously don't want to damage
    > the frame.

    If no gentle solution works try hammering the stem out by hitting it under the bend.

    Sergio Pisa
     
  4. I've had good results on 2 different steel fork bikes with aluminum stems using ammonia and a good
    bench vice. It seems to me that the good bench vice has been crucial. Good Luck, Larry

    "Peter Devine" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi,
    >
    > Anyone got any ideas for a long-standing problem. For the last two years
    I
    > just haven't been able to budge the handlebar stem or its 'spreader' nut. I've tried all the usual
    > techniques plus penetrating oil and using a
    puller
    > from below - to no avail. I forsee a problem one day at an airport - so
    far
    > I've got away without twisting the handlebars.
    >
    > Any ideas welcome - I'm quite prepared to destroy the stem but obviously don't want to damage
    > the frame.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Peter
     
  5. Grenouil

    Grenouil Guest

    "Peter Devine" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi,
    >
    > Anyone got any ideas for a long-standing problem. For the
    last two years I
    > just haven't been able to budge the handlebar stem or its
    'spreader' nut.
    > I've tried all the usual techniques plus penetrating oil
    and using a puller
    > from below - to no avail. I forsee a problem one day at
    an airport - so far
    > I've got away without twisting the handlebars.
    >
    > Any ideas welcome - I'm quite prepared to destroy the stem
    but obviously
    > don't want to damage the frame.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Peter
    >
    Only way I could fix a similar problem was to take out the clamp bolt, drop the 'spreader' out of
    the bottom of the fork, saw off the top of the stem, then - carefully - saw through the stem tube
    inside the steerer. (Take blade out of hacksaw; put blade through steerer/stem; clamp blade back in
    saw; and saw slot in the stem material). The risk, of course, is that you might end up cutting a
    groove in the inside of the steerer.................
     
  6. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    >Any ideas welcome - I'm quite prepared to destroy the stem but obviously don't want to damage
    >the frame.
    >
    >Thanks
    >
    >Peter

    The last one of these I did went as follows:

    Free frame because stem is stuck. Cut off stem to remove fork. Left stem quite long.

    Removed fork (!!)

    Using punch, drove wedge out the bottom of the fork. Turned fork over, using long punch, some lube
    and properly supporting the fork on the crown, used a long punch to knock the stem out.

    Knocking the wedge out was important because it allowed me good contact with the bottom of the stem.

    Jon Isaacs
     
  7. On Thu, 27 Feb 2003, Sergio SERVADIO wrote:
    > > Any ideas welcome - I'm quite prepared to destroy the stem but obviously don't want to damage
    > > the frame.
    > If no gentle solution works try hammering the stem out by hitting it under the bend. Sergio Pisa
    ____________________________________________________________________________

    Let me add for everyone's benefit.

    >From [email protected] Thu Feb 27 16:54:06 2003
    Date: Thu, 27 Feb 2003 16:34:45 +0100 (CET) From: Sergio SERVADIO <[email protected]> To:
    Peter Devine <[email protected]> Subject: RE: Handlebar stem corroded in steerer tube

    > Thanks Sergio - worth a try.

    Absolutely yes. Let me add a couple of tips. The best way is to have an old junked left crank arm,
    by grinding or filing it to shape its head (saddle like, so to speak) to conform best to the
    underside of the stem. When you hammer, have an assistant hold the fork and frame firm with
    sufficient inertia; I do not recommend clamping the frame to a bench or to any improvised clamp that
    could damage it when you are hammering (though you are hitting somewhere else, I mean).

    Let me hear when you make it. Success guaranteed, for sure.

    Sergio Pisa
     
  8. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Peter Devine" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi,
    >
    > Anyone got any ideas for a long-standing problem. For the last two years
    I
    > just haven't been able to budge the handlebar stem or its 'spreader' nut. I've tried all the usual
    > techniques plus penetrating oil and using a
    puller
    > from below - to no avail. I forsee a problem one day at an airport - so
    far
    > I've got away without twisting the handlebars.
    >
    > Any ideas welcome - I'm quite prepared to destroy the stem but obviously don't want to damage
    > the frame.

    When all else fails, cut the stem and withdraw the fork then melt out the stem. The required
    tempertaure is well below any significant effect on the steel steerer and in fact it's sort of fun.
    You end up with neat shapes when the plastic aluminum hits the water bucket below.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  9. Peter Devine

    Peter Devine Guest

    Thank you to everyone who has suggested some really interesting ideas. I'll start with the gentlest
    - dosing with ammonia (as Lawrence suggested) - presumably over a period of days?/weeks?. The first
    problem is to get the 'spreader' nut out since that seems to be corroded to stem, steerer tube or
    both. If that doesn't work I'll work through the progressively more 'brutal' methods! I'll let you
    know how it goes in due course.

    Many thanks once again

    Peter

    "Peter Devine" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi,
    >
    > Anyone got any ideas for a long-standing problem. For the last two years
    I
    > just haven't been able to budge the handlebar stem or its 'spreader' nut. I've tried all the usual
    > techniques plus penetrating oil and using a
    puller
    > from below - to no avail. I forsee a problem one day at an airport - so
    far
    > I've got away without twisting the handlebars.
    >
    > Any ideas welcome - I'm quite prepared to destroy the stem but obviously don't want to damage
    > the frame.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Peter
     
  10. <snip>

    "Peter Devine" <[email protected]> wrote .

    I'll
    > start with the gentlest - dosing with ammonia (as Lawrence suggested) - presumably over a period
    > of days?/weeks?.

    Any good results from ammonia will be quick, within minutes rather than days or weeks. Just pour
    lots in. Good Luck, Larry
     
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