Handlebar tape wound wrong way?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Roger, Mar 15, 2003.

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  1. Roger

    Roger Guest

    I have just taken delivery of a 2002 Dawes Audax and it's great. However, I reckon they have wound
    the handlebar tape the wrong way, starting at the middle. This causes 2 problems - when I have my
    hands just behind the hoods, the generally forward pressure I apply tends to "ruffle" the tape edges
    and make them stick up. Even after my first ride around the block! Also, the ends of the tape at the
    bar ends sticks up slightly. If they started at the ends, this end would be tucked under. But I
    suppose that would just move the problem to the middle of the bars...

    BTW there was a black tapered sticker about 7" long that came with the bike and I don't know what
    it's for. Maybe it's to wrap around the bar end to stop the tape coming adrift. But then there
    should have been 2 stickers, and they should have already been applied to the handlebars?

    cheers Roger
     
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  2. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    Yeah, they wound it the wrong way. With some tapes it's not so bad or noticeable, but with others,
    like your type I suspect, it's brutal. With most h/b tape there are two stickers, usually rainbow
    world champ. type colours or something, and that's to secure the tape at the middle when you're
    done. The lump is much less annoying at the top than at the bottom frankly.

    Cheers,

    Scott..
    --
    Scott Anderson

    "Roger" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have just taken delivery of a 2002 Dawes Audax and it's great. However, I reckon they have wound
    > the handlebar tape the wrong way, starting at the middle. This causes 2 problems - when I have my
    > hands just behind the hoods, the generally forward pressure I apply tends to "ruffle" the tape
    > edges and make them stick up. Even after my first ride around the block! Also, the ends of the
    > tape at the bar ends sticks up slightly. If they started at the ends, this end would be tucked
    > under. But I suppose that would just move the problem to the middle of the
    bars...
    >
    > BTW there was a black tapered sticker about 7" long that came with the bike and I don't know what
    > it's for. Maybe it's to wrap around the bar end to stop the tape coming adrift. But then there
    > should have been 2 stickers, and they should have already been applied to the handlebars?
    >
    > cheers Roger
     
  3. Skip

    Skip Guest

    Roger:

    Good question. Don't know. I have always wrapped my handlebar tape from the "middle" (next to the
    stem) wrapped fore-to-aft (e.g., the tape comes back-over-the-top and forward-underneath the
    handlebars). My reason is that it is easier to secure tape-end in the handlebar plugs (which I can't
    do due to bar-end shifters) than "in the open" near the stem.

    Extra tape underneath the brake hoods (before being wrapped as above) to avoid gaps. I've always
    used the (now old-style) cloth tape.

    Works for me -- is this the pattern that you are describing? My tape is pretty "ratty" but
    fully-functional at this point -- but it hasn't been changed in 20 years either. (But I've been
    through at lest 4 or 5 total re-dos. I'm showing my age...) Nothing that I would not expect.

    From your description, has your supplier done what I do except wrapping "aft-to-fore" (see
    explanation above)? In any event, a handlebar re-wrapping should be a minimal exercise.

    - Skip

    "Roger" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have just taken delivery of a 2002 Dawes Audax and it's great. However, I reckon they have wound
    > the handlebar tape the wrong way, starting at the middle. This causes 2 problems - when I have my
    > hands just behind the hoods, the generally forward pressure I apply tends to "ruffle" the tape
    > edges and make them stick up. Even after my first ride around the block! Also, the ends of the
    > tape at the bar ends sticks up slightly. If they started at the ends, this end would be tucked
    > under. But I suppose that would just move the problem to the middle of the
    bars...
    >
    > BTW there was a black tapered sticker about 7" long that came with the bike and I don't know what
    > it's for. Maybe it's to wrap around the bar end to stop the tape coming adrift. But then there
    > should have been 2 stickers, and they should have already been applied to the handlebars?
    >
    > cheers Roger
     
  4. oger <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I have just taken delivery of a 2002 Dawes Audax and it's great. However, I reckon they have wound
    > the handlebar tape the wrong way, starting at the middle. This causes 2 problems -

    yes, bar tape should start at the ends, tucked under the plug, (wrapping clockwise on right hand
    side as viewed from rear) and be secured with tape near the stem. That cures the problems.

    > BTW there was a black tapered sticker about 7" long that came with the bike and I don't know what
    > it's for. Maybe it's to wrap around the bar end to stop the tape coming adrift. But then there
    > should have been 2 stickers, and they should have already been applied to the handlebars?

    Chainstay protector? Goes on the right stay to mitigate chain slap, if so.
     
  5. Ken

    Ken Guest

    Roger <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > I have just taken delivery of a 2002 Dawes Audax and it's great. However, I reckon they have wound
    > the handlebar tape the wrong way, starting at the middle.

    At one time, the standard procedure was to start wrapping from the middle of the bar. When you got
    to the end, just stuff a little extra tape into the handlebar and secure it with the end plug. That
    worked great with the thin cotton or plastic tape that was popular in the 1970s and 1980s.

    Modern padded tapes are too thick to stuff into the handlebar end. That's the main reason why people
    start wrapping from the end now. You can still start from the middle if you want, just secure the
    ends with plastic tape. Make sure you wrap the tape with the correct coil direction, though. You
    don't want it to unravel from normal hand pressure. The correct coil direction is different for the
    left and right sides of the handlebar.

    Ken
     
  6. On Sat, 15 Mar 2003 21:58:59 -0500, Roger wrote:

    > BTW there was a black tapered sticker about 7" long that came with the bike and I don't know what
    > it's for. Maybe it's to wrap around the bar end to stop the tape coming adrift. But then there
    > should have been 2 stickers, and they should have already been applied to the handlebars?

    Sounds like it's the right size and shape to be a right chainstay protector.
     
  7. On Sat, 15 Mar 2003 14:56:13 -0500, Ken wrote:

    > At one time, the standard procedure was to start wrapping from the middle of the bar. When you got
    > to the end, just stuff a little extra tape into the handlebar and secure it with the end plug.
    > That worked great with the thin cotton or plastic tape that was popular in the 1970s and 1980s.

    Having been around in the '70s, I have to differ with you on that. We always started at the ends.
    >
    > Modern padded tapes are too thick to stuff into the handlebar end. That's the main reason why
    > people start wrapping from the end now.

    No, it's less likely to fray, curl, and slip that way.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Do not worry about your difficulties in mathematics, I can _`\(,_ | assure you that mine
    are all greater. -- A. Einstein (_)/ (_) |
     
  8. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Sat, 15 Mar 2003 21:08:07 -0500, <[email protected]>, "David L. Johnson" <David L.
    Johnson <[email protected]>> wrote:

    >On Sat, 15 Mar 2003 14:56:13 -0500, Ken wrote:
    >
    >> At one time, the standard procedure was to start wrapping from the middle of the bar. When
    >> you got to the end, just stuff a little extra tape into the handlebar and secure it with the
    >> end plug. That worked great with the thin cotton or plastic tape that was popular in the
    >> 1970s and 1980s.
    >
    >Having been around in the '70s, I have to differ with you on that. We always started at the ends.
    >>
    >> Modern padded tapes are too thick to stuff into the handlebar end. That's the main reason why
    >> people start wrapping from the end now.
    >
    >No, it's less likely to fray, curl, and slip that way.

    One just has to remember of the principle of shingles overlapping to shed water when wrapping
    their bars.

    With the early thin plastic ribbon, a neater, though improper, job could be achieved by starting at
    the center with a wrap or two over the dead end and plugging the loose ends.
    --
    zk
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, Roger <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I have just taken delivery of a 2002 Dawes Audax and it's great. However, I reckon they have wound
    >the handlebar tape the wrong way, starting at the middle.

    I always start at the end of the bar and finish in the middle. But there are plenty of people who
    think it's better the other way. For one thing the "wrong way" does make it possible to tape the
    whole bar without using any tape to finish it (not needing those 7" strips you found). I used to
    sometimes get road bikes partially assembled from Asia that came with the bars wrapped that way. It
    is annoying.

    I trim an angle cut about the length of the diameter of the handlebar at both the start and end of
    the handlebar tape. That's because I don't like a lump at the beginning or the end, and I don't like
    to stuff the tape under the end plug, it's ugly/lumpy that way and often cracks the plug. When I
    finish I want the electrical tape to be wrapped no wider than itself - no spiral winding of the
    electrical tape. That requires a tapered cut in the handlebar tape at the finish.

    The little sticker strips that come with handlebar tape for finishing at the stem are not usually
    stretchy enough so I throw them away and use electrical tape.

    This is one of those things where there are lots of opinions that are mostly based on appearance,
    it's best to just wrap your own bars the way you like them.

    --Paul

    PS: I would like to know who does a figure-eight at the brake lever, when using Cinelli tape or
    similar, and where you put any extra chunks of bar tape at the brake lever, whether you do a
    figure-eight or not.
     
  10. Mike Demicco

    Mike Demicco Guest

    Benjamin Weiner wrote:
    > oger <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > yes, bar tape should start at the ends, tucked under the plug, (wrapping clockwise on right hand
    > side as viewed from rear) and be secured with tape near the stem. That cures the problems.

    You should wrap counter-clockwise on the right and clockwise on the left
    - reason being that when you are on the top of the bars you have a tendency to pull back on the bar,
    which will tighten the bar tape if you wrap the way I suggest (note I read this somewhere recently
    and it made sense to me).
     
  11. Chsb

    Chsb Guest

    Roger wrote:

    > I have just taken delivery of a 2002 Dawes Audax and it's great. However, I reckon they have wound
    > the handlebar tape the wrong way, starting at the middle. This causes 2 problems - when I have my
    > hands just behind the hoods, the generally forward pressure I apply tends to "ruffle" the tape
    > edges and make them stick up. Even after my first ride around the block! Also, the ends of the
    > tape at the bar ends sticks up slightly. If they started at the ends, this end would be tucked
    > under. But I suppose that would just move the problem to the middle of the bars...
    >
    > BTW there was a black tapered sticker about 7" long that came with the bike and I don't know what
    > it's for. Maybe it's to wrap around the bar end to stop the tape coming adrift. But then there
    > should have been 2 stickers, and they should have already been applied to the handlebars?
    >
    > cheers Roger

    there is an article on rivendell.com about cross weaving bar tape. Very interesting. I start in the
    middle and go clockwise=right side, counter=left side. Did the figure 8 thing with my old marfaq
    brake levers, but now that I've

    got "new" 1980model shimano levers with their rubber hoods an all, guess I'll jus learn. Seems to me
    like the 7" strip is to cover brake clamp. Seems awfully short for chainstay. Wish I had bar-cons so
    the whole thing could be redone!
     
  12. > > BTW there was a black tapered sticker about 7" long that came with the bike and I don't know
    > > what it's for. Maybe it's to wrap around the bar end to stop the tape coming adrift. But then
    > > there should have been 2 stickers, and they should have already been applied to the handlebars?
    >
    > Chainstay protector? Goes on the right stay to mitigate chain slap, if so.

    Nope, Cut the 7" long tape in half (so you have 2x3.5" bits, use them to secure the tape at the end,
    which should be near the stem. Gemma
     
  13. Gregory Brylski

    Gregory Brylski New Member

    Joined:
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    As someone has already noted, start at the end of the bars and sprial inside out looking down at the top of the bar. I also use the plastic electrical tape method to seal the ends (like one of the other respondents noted. In addition to these, I also wrap the handlebars with a (semi-) permanent double-sided tape (available by say 3M at office supply stores) to keep the tape at the h/b corners above the brake levers from slipping out of place. I've found the backing tape supplied by the h/b tape mfr doesn't hold quite enough. (Probably all purpose (barge) or rubber cement judiciously applied to the handlebars will accomplish the same thing.) It's messy when you have to remove & replace the tape but hey, the whole point is to keep the tape fixed on the handlebars. Oh yeah, when doing a long tour, the handlebar tape inevitably gets torn so I always carry as small roll of plastic electrical tape for repairs. :D
     
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