Handlebars?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by CR_ [email protected], Jul 29, 2004.

  1. I just purchased a new bike.
    It's a trek 5200.
    When i ride more than 10 miles or so I develop wrist pain.
    I also have a cannondale and when i ride this bike I have no problems.
    One thing I have noticed between the two is the cannondale has wider
    handelbars than the Trek.
    Could this be the problem?
    I have very wide shoulders for my size.
    I am thinking maybe it is putting more weight on my wrists or is this
    nonsense or should I look for another cause.....the saddle perhaps?
    Any help would be greatly appreciated!
    This bike is a bitch to ride right now
     
    Tags:


  2. On Thu, 29 Jul 2004 22:53:22 GMT, "CR_ [email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I just purchased a new bike.
    >It's a trek 5200.
    >When i ride more than 10 miles or so I develop wrist pain.


    You have fitting problems, probably as a result of your handlebars
    being set far too low with respect to your saddle. you're putting a
    lot of weight on your hands in an awkward place.

    The shop should have never let you out the door without having fitted
    you properly to a new bike--ESPECIALLY considering the large sum you
    had to hand over for the trek.

    Take it back and kick up a fuss.

    -Luigi
     
  3. Thanks my wife says the same thing!


    They are replacing the handlebars which they feel are the problem,
    they have to order them from Trek.
    I think I am going to have to pay for them:{
    Do you think this is the problem
    If not they are going to screw me again


    "Luigi de Guzman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Thu, 29 Jul 2004 22:53:22 GMT, "CR_ [email protected]"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >I just purchased a new bike.
    > >It's a trek 5200.
    > >When i ride more than 10 miles or so I develop wrist pain.

    >
    > You have fitting problems, probably as a result of your handlebars
    > being set far too low with respect to your saddle. you're putting a
    > lot of weight on your hands in an awkward place.
    >
    > The shop should have never let you out the door without having fitted
    > you properly to a new bike--ESPECIALLY considering the large sum you
    > had to hand over for the trek.
    >
    > Take it back and kick up a fuss.
    >
    > -Luigi
     
  4. On Fri, 30 Jul 2004 01:15:52 GMT, "CR_ [email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Thanks my wife says the same thing!
    >
    >
    >They are replacing the handlebars which they feel are the problem,


    How did they determine that this was the problem?

    >they have to order them from Trek.
    >I think I am going to have to pay for them:{
    >Do you think this is the problem
    >If not they are going to screw me again


    That's outrageous. They fit you poorly for the bike, and they want
    YOU to pay for the bars?

    Name and Shame time. Who are these jokers, and where are they
    located? Nobody should have to put up with this crap.

    -Luigi
     
  5. Bill

    Bill Guest

    "CR_ [email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I just purchased a new bike.
    > It's a trek 5200.
    > When i ride more than 10 miles or so I develop wrist pain.
    > I also have a cannondale and when i ride this bike I have no problems.
    > One thing I have noticed between the two is the cannondale has wider
    > handelbars than the Trek.
    > Could this be the problem?
    > I have very wide shoulders for my size.
    > I am thinking maybe it is putting more weight on my wrists or is this
    > nonsense or should I look for another cause.....the saddle perhaps?
    > Any help would be greatly appreciated!
    > This bike is a bitch to ride right now
    >
    >

    Take both bikes to the shop and have them set up the position on the Trek to
    match the Cannondale. If it's a new bike there should be no charge for
    exchanging like parts for those that fit. They should have done that in the
    first place.

    Additional thought.: Check to see if your seat is to far forward placing to
    much weight on your hands. http://www.sheldonbrown.com/kops.html Keith
    Bontrager's take on position.
    Bill
     
  6. I brought my other bike with me to a compare the two .
    My other bike has wider bars.
    They put my Trek on a trainer and had me ride it.
    I got off the bike and they measured my shoulders and said i should try
    wider bars.
    Another guy suggested it could be the saddle/

    All i want is the f**kin bike fixed at this point.
    10 miles or more and I am hurting.

    Also I forgot to mention
    One of my cycling buddies also thought maybe the bars were to narrow.
    But when I first mentioned that to the dealer on the phone they said it
    surely wasn't that.
    They said the stem probably needed to be raised.
    Now they want to try wider bars instead

    So to get back to my original question
    Does anybody think wider bars will solve the problem .
    I like to fix this once and for all especially if I am paying the tab .

    As Lugi stated
    This bike ain't cheap




    "Luigi de Guzman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Fri, 30 Jul 2004 01:15:52 GMT, "CR_ [email protected]"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Thanks my wife says the same thing!
    > >
    > >
    > >They are replacing the handlebars which they feel are the problem,

    >
    > How did they determine that this was the problem?
    >
    > >they have to order them from Trek.
    > >I think I am going to have to pay for them:{
    > >Do you think this is the problem
    > >If not they are going to screw me again

    >
    > That's outrageous. They fit you poorly for the bike, and they want
    > YOU to pay for the bars?
    >
    > Name and Shame time. Who are these jokers, and where are they
    > located? Nobody should have to put up with this crap.
    >
    > -Luigi
     
  7. warek

    warek New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2003
    Messages:
    3
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    0
    I have been given an old pair (10 years) of these bars and teh plastic end piece that joins teh two arms together is broken.
    Is it safe to use the bars without this?
    Where would I buy a replacement piece if needed?

    Kevin
    Australia
     
  8. On Fri, 30 Jul 2004 04:32:35 GMT, "CR_ [email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I brought my other bike with me to a compare the two .
    >My other bike has wider bars.
    >They put my Trek on a trainer and had me ride it.
    >I got off the bike and they measured my shoulders and said i should try
    >wider bars.
    >Another guy suggested it could be the saddle/


    Are your wrists splayed funny when you ride on the hoods? To get a
    tingle in my wrists from having them too close together with
    everything else aligned for riding on the hoods of an imaginary
    handlebar, I have to have them nearly touching, my hands at right
    angles, palms facing out.

    I didn't see you on the trainer, so I don't know--but again, did they
    try adjusting the height of the handlebars at all?

    >Also I forgot to mention
    >One of my cycling buddies also thought maybe the bars were to narrow.
    >But when I first mentioned that to the dealer on the phone they said it
    >surely wasn't that.
    >They said the stem probably needed to be raised.


    That's my first reaction. Did you have them try that, first?

    >Now they want to try wider bars instead


    Perhaps at your insistence?

    >
    >So to get back to my original question
    >Does anybody think wider bars will solve the problem .
    >I like to fix this once and for all especially if I am paying the tab .


    The problem is probably too-low handlebars caused by a steerer tube
    being cut too short, and then fitting a stem with insufficient rise.
    This might have been avoided if they had fitted you properly, then cut
    the steerer tube to the appropriate height.

    Is your saddle angled down? It may be that you're sliding down in the
    saddle as you ride, and having to push back with your hands, causing
    pain in your wrists.

    Sheldon Brown has a whole website on bicycling pain:

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/pain


    -Luigi
     
  9. The feeling I get in my wrists can best be described is as if someone was
    pulling my fingers backward for a long period of time.

    The wider bars was not my idea since they shot this down over the phone.

    As far as raising the stem which they suggested over the phone.
    They measured from the saddle to the bars and said it wasn't necessary.
    The saddle is level.
    It is as far back as it will go
    I tried moving it around a bit on my last ride trying to help .

    If they put wider bars on my bike are there any negatives in doing this?

    Oh I forgot to mention
    The bars are Bontanger and I believe they can't be raised very easily.
    At least that is what I was told


    "Luigi de Guzman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Fri, 30 Jul 2004 04:32:35 GMT, "CR_ [email protected]"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >I brought my other bike with me to a compare the two .
    > >My other bike has wider bars.
    > >They put my Trek on a trainer and had me ride it.
    > >I got off the bike and they measured my shoulders and said i should try
    > >wider bars.
    > >Another guy suggested it could be the saddle/

    >
    > Are your wrists splayed funny when you ride on the hoods? To get a
    > tingle in my wrists from having them too close together with
    > everything else aligned for riding on the hoods of an imaginary
    > handlebar, I have to have them nearly touching, my hands at right
    > angles, palms facing out.
    >
    > I didn't see you on the trainer, so I don't know--but again, did they
    > try adjusting the height of the handlebars at all?
    >
    > >Also I forgot to mention
    > >One of my cycling buddies also thought maybe the bars were to narrow.
    > >But when I first mentioned that to the dealer on the phone they said it
    > >surely wasn't that.
    > >They said the stem probably needed to be raised.

    >
    > That's my first reaction. Did you have them try that, first?
    >
    > >Now they want to try wider bars instead

    >
    > Perhaps at your insistence?
    >
    > >
    > >So to get back to my original question
    > >Does anybody think wider bars will solve the problem .
    > >I like to fix this once and for all especially if I am paying the tab .

    >
    > The problem is probably too-low handlebars caused by a steerer tube
    > being cut too short, and then fitting a stem with insufficient rise.
    > This might have been avoided if they had fitted you properly, then cut
    > the steerer tube to the appropriate height.
    >
    > Is your saddle angled down? It may be that you're sliding down in the
    > saddle as you ride, and having to push back with your hands, causing
    > pain in your wrists.
    >
    > Sheldon Brown has a whole website on bicycling pain:
    >
    > http://www.sheldonbrown.com/pain
    >
    >
    > -Luigi
     
  10. Robert

    Robert Guest

    Bill wrote:
    > "CR_ [email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>I just purchased a new bike.
    >>It's a trek 5200.
    >>When i ride more than 10 miles or so I develop wrist pain.
    >>I also have a cannondale and when i ride this bike I have no problems.
    >>One thing I have noticed between the two is the cannondale has wider
    >>handelbars than the Trek.
    >>Could this be the problem?
    >>I have very wide shoulders for my size.
    >>I am thinking maybe it is putting more weight on my wrists or is this
    >>nonsense or should I look for another cause.....the saddle perhaps?
    >>Any help would be greatly appreciated!
    >>This bike is a bitch to ride right now
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Take both bikes to the shop and have them set up the position on the Trek to
    > match the Cannondale. If it's a new bike there should be no charge for
    > exchanging like parts for those that fit. They should have done that in the
    > first place.
    >
    > Additional thought.: Check to see if your seat is to far forward placing to
    > much weight on your hands. http://www.sheldonbrown.com/kops.html Keith
    > Bontrager's take on position.
    > Bill


    I'll second Bill's idea of getting the LBS to match the new bike to the
    old one identically, as far as fit is concerned. It's also in the
    interests of the LBS to do so. If they can show that they've matched
    your new bike to your old in terms of fit, then they can (quite rightly)
    claim that you haven't a leg to stand on, in terms of future complaints.
    And it's almost certain that your wrist pain will disappear.

    I myself have experimented with bar width (fro 38cm to 44 cm) and
    noticed no difference as far as wrist pain goes (I get it occasionally,
    as well as finger numbness due to vibration). I can imagine, though,
    that if you have a "bad" riding position, that the "wrong" bar width may
    make it more uncomfortable. But the root cause of the problem is more
    likely to be something like bars set too low, too long stem, or even
    something like angle of bars / position of brake lever hoods.

    Can't remember details of your bikes, but it wouldn't surprise me if the
    LBS has cut the steerer too short for your ideal riding position. This
    would be really difficult to fix, unless you flip the stem to point
    upwards, or buy a new fork.

    Finally review (yes, one more time) all fit parameters on the old bike:
    * centre of bottom bracket to seat top, along seat tube (giving seat
    height). Assuming you're not switching crank length, of course.
    * seat tilt
    * distance between seat tip and vertical line projected up from centre
    of bottom bracket (giving seat position fore/aft)
    * distance of centre of handlebars from seat tip (giving reach)
    * distance between handlebar tops and horizontal line projected forwards
    from seat tip (giving bar height relative to seat)
    * angle of handlebar tops, location and angle of brake levers/hoods,
    difference in height between tops and drops (what else have I missed now).

    .. . . . and make sure that the LBS sets up the new bike identically.

    Pls excuse if I have duplicated other respondents' good advice in this
    mail. Credit goes to them, at any rate.

    /Robert
     
  11. << I just purchased a new bike.
    It's a trek 5200. >><BR><BR>
    << When i ride more than 10 miles or so I develop wrist pain. >><BR><BR>
    << Any help would be greatly appreciated!
    This bike is a bitch to ride right now
    >><BR><BR>


    Sounds like you had the 'standover, ride around the parking lot' type fit. See
    a fit person, somebody that can start with saddle position, height and go
    forward.

    Peter Chisholm
    Vecchio's Bicicletteria
    1833 Pearl St.
    Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535
    http://www.vecchios.com
    "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  12. You hit the nail right on the head.
    It was exactly that!!!!!!!!!
    Ride around the parking lot and let me look!!!

    Thanks for the responses to my question folks
    It's obvious to me we have some smart people here regarding bicycles.
    More than my LBS that's for sure





    "Qui si parla Campagnolo " <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > << I just purchased a new bike.
    > It's a trek 5200. >><BR><BR>
    > << When i ride more than 10 miles or so I develop wrist pain. >><BR><BR>
    > << Any help would be greatly appreciated!
    > This bike is a bitch to ride right now
    > >><BR><BR>

    >
    > Sounds like you had the 'standover, ride around the parking lot' type fit.

    See
    > a fit person, somebody that can start with saddle position, height and go
    > forward.
    >
    > Peter Chisholm
    > Vecchio's Bicicletteria
    > 1833 Pearl St.
    > Boulder, CO, 80302
    > (303)440-3535
    > http://www.vecchios.com
    > "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  13. g.daniels

    g.daniels Guest

    a wider bar than stock opens the rib cage and allows much more
    effective breathing-if you think about breathing. Narrow bars mean
    higher profits from less material use.
    wider pedal positon? wider stance? same deal. think martial arts
    postures.
     
  14. Rick Warner

    Rick Warner Guest

    "CR_ [email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > The feeling I get in my wrists can best be described is as if someone was
    > pulling my fingers backward for a long period of time.
    >
    > The wider bars was not my idea since they shot this down over the phone.
    >
    > As far as raising the stem which they suggested over the phone.
    > They measured from the saddle to the bars and said it wasn't necessary.


    Did the measure: a) floor to saddle, b) floor to bars, and c) take
    the difference between the two?

    > The saddle is level.


    Good.

    > It is as far back as it will go


    But it may not be back far enough. Wrist pain is likely caused by too
    much weight on the hands and is not by bars that are too narrow. Too
    much weight on the hands is a question of balance; the weight is too
    far forward. A proper fit would have most of the weight on your
    butt, and that is a function of getting the seat far enough back. You
    might need a different seatpost to get the seat back far enough, but
    you may need to get the seat back further and the bars higher to get
    some weight off your hands.

    > I tried moving it around a bit on my last ride trying to help .
    >
    > If they put wider bars on my bike are there any negatives in doing this?


    Only in some types of racing events ....

    > Oh I forgot to mention
    > The bars are Bontanger and I believe they can't be raised very easily.
    > At least that is what I was told


    Manufacturer of the bars is irrelevant, and the bars have nothing to
    do with the ability to raise/lower the height of them above ground.
    The two relevant issues are length of the steerer, and the stem angle
    and length. As someone else opined, it appears that the shop did a
    poor job of fitting, probably to the point of cutting the steerer tube
    too short. Now to fix what they likely 'broke' it will take maybe and
    adapter and/or a sharply angled stem. The fix should be on their
    nickel, not yours.

    - rick
     
  15. Mark

    Mark Guest

    "CR_ [email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I just purchased a new bike.
    > It's a trek 5200.
    > When i ride more than 10 miles or so I develop wrist pain.
    > I also have a cannondale and when i ride this bike I have no problems.
    > One thing I have noticed between the two is the cannondale has wider
    > handelbars than the Trek.
    > Could this be the problem?
    > I have very wide shoulders for my size.
    > I am thinking maybe it is putting more weight on my wrists or is this
    > nonsense or should I look for another cause.....the saddle perhaps?
    > Any help would be greatly appreciated!
    > This bike is a bitch to ride right now


    Hi< You haven't posted any follow-up, or what the prognosis was with
    your problem, and if the problem was solved, and how?

    I myself am interested to hear how you made out with this problem?
    Hope you've got it solved, Mark d.
     
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