Handlebars

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Mark, Apr 7, 2003.

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  1. Mark

    Mark Guest

    I'm getting a new road bike. The main decision I have to make at the moment is to do with
    handlebars. Drops is the obvious option, but I've also seen others which are similar to drops but
    stop at the brake levers - dunno what they're called. Just wondered whether anyone has had
    experience of these others & the pros & cons for both.

    Ta for any thoughts,

    Mark
     
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  2. M Series

    M Series Guest

    These are (used to be) known as Bull Horns, they usually are set so that the riding position is same
    as it is whilst on the drops. Often found on TT machines, especially low profiles

    No experience of them, loads of experience of traditional drops, they give many riding
    positions though.

    "Mark" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'm getting a new road bike. The main decision I have to make at the moment is to do with
    > handlebars. Drops is the obvious option, but I've also seen others which are similar to drops but
    > stop at the brake levers - dunno what they're called. Just wondered whether anyone has had
    > experience of these others & the pros & cons for both.
    >
    > Ta for any thoughts,
    >
    > Mark
     
  3. Chris French

    Chris French Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Mark
    <[email protected]> writes
    >I'm getting a new road bike. The main decision I have to make at the moment is to do with
    >handlebars. Drops is the obvious option, but I've also seen others which are similar to drops but
    >stop at the brake levers - dunno what they're called.

    I used a pair of drop turned upside down and cut of on the bend with the brake leaver mounted
    underneath for sometime (on my tourer and on my utility bike.

    If you don't use the drops then they give the benefits of some different positions, without the need
    for drops and put the brake levers in a more convenient positions.

    Downside is that you don't have the drops to go down onto when you might want to.....
    >

    --
    Chris French, Leeds
     
  4. In message <[email protected]>, Dave
    <[email protected]> writes
    >I only use the type of bar you describe and I love them. Profile Airwings is one to look for
    >(available in two widths 40 and 42mm)
    >
    >Regards Dave

    It's actually 'Profile Airwing'.
    --
    Michael MacClancy
     
  5. Dave

    Dave Guest

    I only use the type of bar you describe and I love them. Profile Airwings is one to look for
    (available in two widths 40 and 42mm)

    Regards Dave

    "chris French" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In message <[email protected]>, Mark
    > <[email protected]> writes
    > >I'm getting a new road bike. The main decision I have to make at the moment is to do with
    > >handlebars. Drops is the obvious option, but I've also seen others which are similar to drops but
    > >stop at the brake levers - dunno what they're called.
    >
    > I used a pair of drop turned upside down and cut of on the bend with the brake leaver mounted
    > underneath for sometime (on my tourer and on my utility bike.
    >
    > If you don't use the drops then they give the benefits of some different positions, without the
    > need for drops and put the brake levers in a more convenient positions.
    >
    > Downside is that you don't have the drops to go down onto when you might want to.....
    > >
    >
    > --
    > Chris French, Leeds
     
  6. Mark

    Mark Guest

    > I only use the type of bar you describe and I love them. Profile Airwings is one to look for
    > (available in two widths 40 and 42mm)

    Just wondered what advantages/disadvantages they have over conventional drops...

    Mark
     
  7. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Mark <[email protected]> wrote:

    : Just wondered what advantages/disadvantages they have over conventional drops...

    You usually see them on TT bikes. With Aerobars they are more aero-dynamic than normal drops.

    The big disadvantage for me is that I find them less comfortable than drops. I had a fixie running
    with cut-off inverted drop for quite a while but didn't find it comfortable for rides of more than
    20 miles, so I swapped back to drops.

    If you want to try it, I'd suggest getting some old drops and inverting them (after cutting with a
    hacksaw) to see if you like it.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org Power is delightful. Absolute power is absolutely delightful -
    Lord Lester
     
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