Handling 150 lbs devices

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Ignoramus23984, Mar 2, 2006.

  1. I am soon going to pick up six devices, each is a rectangular shape
    approximately 2x1.5x1 foot. Each weighs 150 lbs. I hope that the
    seller will load them into my pickup with a forklift, but unloading is
    where I have my doubts. I could unload them with a chain hoist or a
    "shop crane", but that is a hassle.

    I do generally deadlift 170 lbs, but I am a little afraid that
    unloading is a different kind of movement and is more injury prone. I
    am not really all that worried to damage the devices, each cost me
    around $6, but I do not want to get injured.

    So, I am looking for some simple unloading ideas that could make it a
    little safer. Such as, perhaps, to put a "step" close to the tailgate
    so that I could first lower the thing on that step, and only then to
    the dolly.

    Maybe I am just a wuss and unloading should be no problem, but I
    wanted to check with knowledgeable people.

    Any thoughts?

    i
     
    Tags:


  2. Justin

    Justin Guest

    Ignoramus23984 wrote:
    > I am soon going to pick up six devices, each is a rectangular shape
    > approximately 2x1.5x1 foot. Each weighs 150 lbs. I hope that the
    > seller will load them into my pickup with a forklift, but unloading is
    > where I have my doubts. I could unload them with a chain hoist or a
    > "shop crane", but that is a hassle.
    >
    > I do generally deadlift 170 lbs, but I am a little afraid that
    > unloading is a different kind of movement and is more injury prone. I
    > am not really all that worried to damage the devices, each cost me
    > around $6, but I do not want to get injured.
    >
    > So, I am looking for some simple unloading ideas that could make it a
    > little safer. Such as, perhaps, to put a "step" close to the tailgate
    > so that I could first lower the thing on that step, and only then to
    > the dolly.
    >
    > Maybe I am just a wuss and unloading should be no problem, but I
    > wanted to check with knowledgeable people.



    Definitely the kind of thing to get some kinda of assistance for. See
    if you can get/build a cart the same height as your tailgate so you can
    slide them right onto it and not have to lift them at all. That would
    be ideal. Failing that maybe use a ramp and a rope to slide them down
    to the ground. Back injuries take a long time to heal, and are a
    serious business, it's not "wussy" to take care of yourself, it's smart.
     
  3. Tom Gardner

    Tom Gardner Guest

    Buy a 12-pack and invite some younger backs over.


    "Ignoramus23984" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:%[email protected]
    >I am soon going to pick up six devices, each is a rectangular shape
    > approximately 2x1.5x1 foot. Each weighs 150 lbs. I hope that the
    > seller will load them into my pickup with a forklift, but unloading is
    > where I have my doubts. I could unload them with a chain hoist or a
    > "shop crane", but that is a hassle.
    >
    > I do generally deadlift 170 lbs, but I am a little afraid that
    > unloading is a different kind of movement and is more injury prone. I
    > am not really all that worried to damage the devices, each cost me
    > around $6, but I do not want to get injured.
    >
    > So, I am looking for some simple unloading ideas that could make it a
    > little safer. Such as, perhaps, to put a "step" close to the tailgate
    > so that I could first lower the thing on that step, and only then to
    > the dolly.
    >
    > Maybe I am just a wuss and unloading should be no problem, but I
    > wanted to check with knowledgeable people.
    >
    > Any thoughts?
    >
    > i
    >
     
  4. Ranieri

    Ranieri Guest

    "Ignoramus23984" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:%[email protected]
    >I am soon going to pick up six devices, each is a rectangular shape
    > approximately 2x1.5x1 foot. Each weighs 150 lbs. I hope that the
    > seller will load them into my pickup with a forklift, but unloading is
    > where I have my doubts. I could unload them with a chain hoist or a
    > "shop crane", but that is a hassle.
    >
    > I do generally deadlift 170 lbs, but I am a little afraid that
    > unloading is a different kind of movement and is more injury prone. I
    > am not really all that worried to damage the devices, each cost me
    > around $6, but I do not want to get injured.
    >
    > So, I am looking for some simple unloading ideas that could make it a
    > little safer. Such as, perhaps, to put a "step" close to the tailgate
    > so that I could first lower the thing on that step, and only then to
    > the dolly.
    >
    > Maybe I am just a wuss and unloading should be no problem, but I
    > wanted to check with knowledgeable people.
    >
    > Any thoughts?
    >
    > i
    >


    Handy hydraulic cart
    http://tinyurl.com/ls5l5
     
  5. Tim Wescott

    Tim Wescott Guest

    Ignoramus23984 wrote:

    > I am soon going to pick up six devices, each is a rectangular shape
    > approximately 2x1.5x1 foot. Each weighs 150 lbs. I hope that the
    > seller will load them into my pickup with a forklift, but unloading is
    > where I have my doubts. I could unload them with a chain hoist or a
    > "shop crane", but that is a hassle.
    >
    > I do generally deadlift 170 lbs, but I am a little afraid that
    > unloading is a different kind of movement and is more injury prone. I
    > am not really all that worried to damage the devices, each cost me
    > around $6, but I do not want to get injured.
    >
    > So, I am looking for some simple unloading ideas that could make it a
    > little safer. Such as, perhaps, to put a "step" close to the tailgate
    > so that I could first lower the thing on that step, and only then to
    > the dolly.
    >
    > Maybe I am just a wuss and unloading should be no problem, but I
    > wanted to check with knowledgeable people.
    >
    > Any thoughts?
    >
    > i
    >

    When my Dad hurt his back carrying a Ford flat-head V-8 around his shop
    it took him long enough to heal that he'd learned bodywork. Then he
    started a custom rod shop.

    So unless you're thinking of a career change you should maybe get help.

    Wussy is not doing what you can easily do. _Really_ wussy is hurting
    yourself because you're afraid of looking wussy, if that makes sense.

    --

    Tim Wescott
    Wescott Design Services
    http://www.wescottdesign.com

    Posting from Google? See http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/
     
  6. On 2 Mar 2006 13:45:53 -0800, Justin <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Ignoramus23984 wrote:
    >> I am soon going to pick up six devices, each is a rectangular shape
    >> approximately 2x1.5x1 foot. Each weighs 150 lbs. I hope that the
    >> seller will load them into my pickup with a forklift, but unloading is
    >> where I have my doubts. I could unload them with a chain hoist or a
    >> "shop crane", but that is a hassle.
    >>
    >> I do generally deadlift 170 lbs, but I am a little afraid that
    >> unloading is a different kind of movement and is more injury prone. I
    >> am not really all that worried to damage the devices, each cost me
    >> around $6, but I do not want to get injured.
    >>
    >> So, I am looking for some simple unloading ideas that could make it a
    >> little safer. Such as, perhaps, to put a "step" close to the tailgate
    >> so that I could first lower the thing on that step, and only then to
    >> the dolly.
    >>
    >> Maybe I am just a wuss and unloading should be no problem, but I
    >> wanted to check with knowledgeable people.

    >
    >
    > Definitely the kind of thing to get some kinda of assistance for. See
    > if you can get/build a cart the same height as your tailgate so you can
    > slide them right onto it and not have to lift them at all. That would
    > be ideal. Failing that maybe use a ramp and a rope to slide them down
    > to the ground. Back injuries take a long time to heal, and are a
    > serious business, it's not "wussy" to take care of yourself, it's smart.
    >


    Thanks Justin. Good thoughts, I think that I will find/build something
    for safety.

    i
     
  7. On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 13:56:13 -0800, Tim Wescott <[email protected]> wrote:
    > When my Dad hurt his back carrying a Ford flat-head V-8 around his shop
    > it took him long enough to heal that he'd learned bodywork. Then he
    > started a custom rod shop.
    >
    > So unless you're thinking of a career change you should maybe get help.
    >
    > Wussy is not doing what you can easily do. _Really_ wussy is hurting
    > yourself because you're afraid of looking wussy, if that makes sense.
    >


    Thanks Tim. You are right. Nothing worse than being injured.

    You can see a similar device at

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7591573234

    The seller is wrong, it weighs 152 lbs, not 180, but the pictures are
    telling.

    Jim's suggestion of a lift cart is a good one, but I do not have it at
    this time.

    i

    i
    i
     
  8. Tim, any relation to Wescott Auto, as in fiberglass bodies?
    Bill.
     
  9. On Thu, 2 Mar 2006 17:23:52 -0500, Lee Michaels <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:
    >
    > "Ignoramus23984" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:%[email protected]
    >>I am soon going to pick up six devices, each is a rectangular shape
    >> approximately 2x1.5x1 foot. Each weighs 150 lbs. I hope that the
    >> seller will load them into my pickup with a forklift, but unloading is
    >> where I have my doubts. I could unload them with a chain hoist or a
    >> "shop crane", but that is a hassle.
    >>
    >> I do generally deadlift 170 lbs, but I am a little afraid that
    >> unloading is a different kind of movement and is more injury prone. I
    >> am not really all that worried to damage the devices, each cost me
    >> around $6, but I do not want to get injured.
    >>
    >> So, I am looking for some simple unloading ideas that could make it a
    >> little safer. Such as, perhaps, to put a "step" close to the tailgate
    >> so that I could first lower the thing on that step, and only then to
    >> the dolly.
    >>
    >> Maybe I am just a wuss and unloading should be no problem, but I
    >> wanted to check with knowledgeable people.
    >>
    >> Any thoughts?
    >>

    > Two thoughts.
    >
    > Rent (or buy) an engine hoist.
    >
    > http://da.harborfreight.com/cpisearch/web/search.do


    I have exactly that (I call it a shop crane, perhaps incorrectly), but
    it is a hassle to use in this instance. Think about how many movements
    need to be done, truck started and moved, etc.

    > You can also buy, build or rent some ramps for pickups fairly reasonable.
    > These are good to have anyway. You can always use a come along to raise or
    > lower a load up and down the ramps.
    >
    > http://da.harborfreight.com/cpisearch/web/search.do
    >
    > This is a picture of a come along
    >
    > http://da.harborfreight.com/cpisearch/web/search.do
    >
    > All of these items can be rented. There are also metal tips that you can
    > buy to fit two by lumber tomake these ramps.
    >


    Thanks. Ramps could be a good alternative actually, and here with 152
    lbs I could get away with some simple stuff.

    i
     
  10. Lee Michaels

    Lee Michaels Guest

    "Ignoramus23984" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:%[email protected]
    >I am soon going to pick up six devices, each is a rectangular shape
    > approximately 2x1.5x1 foot. Each weighs 150 lbs. I hope that the
    > seller will load them into my pickup with a forklift, but unloading is
    > where I have my doubts. I could unload them with a chain hoist or a
    > "shop crane", but that is a hassle.
    >
    > I do generally deadlift 170 lbs, but I am a little afraid that
    > unloading is a different kind of movement and is more injury prone. I
    > am not really all that worried to damage the devices, each cost me
    > around $6, but I do not want to get injured.
    >
    > So, I am looking for some simple unloading ideas that could make it a
    > little safer. Such as, perhaps, to put a "step" close to the tailgate
    > so that I could first lower the thing on that step, and only then to
    > the dolly.
    >
    > Maybe I am just a wuss and unloading should be no problem, but I
    > wanted to check with knowledgeable people.
    >
    > Any thoughts?
    >

    Two thoughts.

    Rent (or buy) an engine hoist.

    http://da.harborfreight.com/cpisearch/web/search.do

    You can also buy, build or rent some ramps for pickups fairly reasonable.
    These are good to have anyway. You can always use a come along to raise or
    lower a load up and down the ramps.

    http://da.harborfreight.com/cpisearch/web/search.do

    This is a picture of a come along

    http://da.harborfreight.com/cpisearch/web/search.do

    All of these items can be rented. There are also metal tips that you can
    buy to fit two by lumber tomake these ramps.
     
  11. Best idea yet!!!!

    "Tom Gardner" <tom(nospam)@ohiobrush.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected].prodigy.com...
    > Buy a 12-pack and invite some younger backs over.
    >
    >
    > "Ignoramus23984" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:%[email protected]
    > >I am soon going to pick up six devices, each is a rectangular shape
    > > approximately 2x1.5x1 foot. Each weighs 150 lbs. I hope that the
    > > seller will load them into my pickup with a forklift, but unloading is
    > > where I have my doubts. I could unload them with a chain hoist or a
    > > "shop crane", but that is a hassle.
    > >
    > > I do generally deadlift 170 lbs, but I am a little afraid that
    > > unloading is a different kind of movement and is more injury prone. I
    > > am not really all that worried to damage the devices, each cost me
    > > around $6, but I do not want to get injured.
    > >
    > > So, I am looking for some simple unloading ideas that could make it a
    > > little safer. Such as, perhaps, to put a "step" close to the tailgate
    > > so that I could first lower the thing on that step, and only then to
    > > the dolly.
    > >
    > > Maybe I am just a wuss and unloading should be no problem, but I
    > > wanted to check with knowledgeable people.
    > >
    > > Any thoughts?
    > >
    > > i
    > >

    >
    >
     
  12. Tim Wescott

    Tim Wescott Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Tim, any relation to Wescott Auto, as in fiberglass bodies?
    > Bill.
    >

    Yes -- that's my dad's company (with lots of help from my brother). I
    used to work there when I was in high school and college. Along with a
    lot of scut work I did quite a bit of mold work, both the fiberglass and
    metal reinforcing for the molds.

    The body that we used as a pattern for the '39 convertible was in such
    sad shape that we just took temporary molds off the panels then
    hand-built a plug, correcting problems as we went -- the floor pattern
    came from a '39 or '40 woody (which was just a good floor and a few
    scraps of cowl sheetmetal when I knew it). I helped to hand-assemble
    the plug for the body (with a few fierce 'technical discussions' with my
    dad about the best approach to take).

    --

    Tim Wescott
    Wescott Design Services
    http://www.wescottdesign.com

    Posting from Google? See http://cfaj.freeshell.org/google/
     
  13. Lee Michaels

    Lee Michaels Guest

    "Ignoramus23984" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Thu, 2 Mar 2006 17:23:52 -0500, Lee Michaels
    > <leemichaels*nadaspam*@comcast.net> wrote:
    >>
    >> "Ignoramus23984" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:%[email protected]
    >>>I am soon going to pick up six devices, each is a rectangular shape
    >>> approximately 2x1.5x1 foot. Each weighs 150 lbs. I hope that the
    >>> seller will load them into my pickup with a forklift, but unloading is
    >>> where I have my doubts. I could unload them with a chain hoist or a
    >>> "shop crane", but that is a hassle.
    >>>
    >>> I do generally deadlift 170 lbs, but I am a little afraid that
    >>> unloading is a different kind of movement and is more injury prone. I
    >>> am not really all that worried to damage the devices, each cost me
    >>> around $6, but I do not want to get injured.
    >>>
    >>> So, I am looking for some simple unloading ideas that could make it a
    >>> little safer. Such as, perhaps, to put a "step" close to the tailgate
    >>> so that I could first lower the thing on that step, and only then to
    >>> the dolly.
    >>>
    >>> Maybe I am just a wuss and unloading should be no problem, but I
    >>> wanted to check with knowledgeable people.
    >>>
    >>> Any thoughts?
    >>>

    >> Two thoughts.
    >>
    >> Rent (or buy) an engine hoist.
    >>
    >> http://da.harborfreight.com/cpisearch/web/search.do

    >
    > I have exactly that (I call it a shop crane, perhaps incorrectly), but
    > it is a hassle to use in this instance. Think about how many movements
    > need to be done, truck started and moved, etc.
    >
    >> You can also buy, build or rent some ramps for pickups fairly reasonable.
    >> These are good to have anyway. You can always use a come along to raise
    >> or
    >> lower a load up and down the ramps.
    >>
    >> http://da.harborfreight.com/cpisearch/web/search.do
    >>
    >> This is a picture of a come along
    >>
    >> http://da.harborfreight.com/cpisearch/web/search.do
    >>
    >> All of these items can be rented. There are also metal tips that you can
    >> buy to fit two by lumber tomake these ramps.
    >>

    >
    > Thanks. Ramps could be a good alternative actually, and here with 152
    > lbs I could get away with some simple stuff.
    >


    Here is a picture of the kits I was talking about. These are actually
    available from many sources. I am not doing that good coming up with
    anything on the web though. This all I could come up with on short notice.

    http://www.sportsimportsltd.com/truckrampkit.html


    By the way, what are you going to use those big power supplies for?
     
  14. wayne mak

    wayne mak Guest

    So you are driving to CT?
    "Ignoramus23984" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 13:56:13 -0800, Tim Wescott <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >> When my Dad hurt his back carrying a Ford flat-head V-8 around his shop
    >> it took him long enough to heal that he'd learned bodywork. Then he
    >> started a custom rod shop.
    >>
    >> So unless you're thinking of a career change you should maybe get help.
    >>
    >> Wussy is not doing what you can easily do. _Really_ wussy is hurting
    >> yourself because you're afraid of looking wussy, if that makes sense.
    >>

    >
    > Thanks Tim. You are right. Nothing worse than being injured.
    >
    > You can see a similar device at
    >
    > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7591573234
    >
    > The seller is wrong, it weighs 152 lbs, not 180, but the pictures are
    > telling.
    >
    > Jim's suggestion of a lift cart is a good one, but I do not have it at
    > this time.
    >
    > i
    >
    > i
    > i
    >
     
  15. Ranieri

    Ranieri Guest

    "Ignoramus23984" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 13:56:13 -0800, Tim Wescott <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >> When my Dad hurt his back carrying a Ford flat-head V-8 around his shop
    >> it took him long enough to heal that he'd learned bodywork. Then he
    >> started a custom rod shop.
    >>
    >> So unless you're thinking of a career change you should maybe get help.
    >>
    >> Wussy is not doing what you can easily do. _Really_ wussy is hurting
    >> yourself because you're afraid of looking wussy, if that makes sense.
    >>

    >
    > Thanks Tim. You are right. Nothing worse than being injured.
    >
    > You can see a similar device at
    >
    > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=7591573234
    >
    > The seller is wrong, it weighs 152 lbs, not 180, but the pictures are
    > telling.
    >
    > Jim's suggestion of a lift cart is a good one, but I do not have it at
    > this time.
    >


    Hey, if you're in the Chi 'burbs and want to borrow mine...
     
  16. Jon Elson

    Jon Elson Guest

    Ignoramus23984 wrote:

    >I am soon going to pick up six devices, each is a rectangular shape
    >approximately 2x1.5x1 foot. Each weighs 150 lbs. I hope that the
    >seller will load them into my pickup with a forklift, but unloading is
    >where I have my doubts. I could unload them with a chain hoist or a
    >"shop crane", but that is a hassle.
    >
    >I do generally deadlift 170 lbs, but I am a little afraid that
    >unloading is a different kind of movement and is more injury prone. I
    >am not really all that worried to damage the devices, each cost me
    >around $6, but I do not want to get injured.
    >
    >

    I put a 90 Lb vise on and off my mill without much trouble, but that is
    about
    my limit. No way would I try to lift anything weighing 150 Lbs, with
    the possible exception of lifting one end at a time to slip a sling,
    board or
    whatever under it. (I have lifted a lathe apron that was close to that
    weight just once, and it was a total bear.)

    If you screw up your back, it will NEVER completely heal. Take that from
    one who has done it! I made it to about 52 without wrecking my back,
    but then
    I had 3 incidents in 2 weeks that collectively did some real damage.
    There are
    now certain movements, generally reaching out in front of me
    a little bit and lifting something heavy, that I can't do anymore
    without risk
    of a major breakdown in my back. If you don't have a shop crane of some
    sort,
    with all the stuff you are doing, you really need to get one.

    I have enough stuff around here that I can't lift myself, so I don't
    feel the
    crane was wasted.

    >So, I am looking for some simple unloading ideas that could make it a
    >little safer. Such as, perhaps, to put a "step" close to the tailgate
    >so that I could first lower the thing on that step, and only then to
    >the dolly.
    >
    >

    I do have a scheme where you put a ladder from the vehicle to the
    ground, shim
    the object up and onto a board on the ladder, and then slide it down.
    It has
    always worked just swell until I tried to do it to a 375 Lb surface
    plate still in
    the crate. I was trying to tug the crate over to the ladder when there
    was a
    "bad noise" from my back. That was that crowning 3rd incident that tore up
    my back. I wasn't actually even trying to lift it, but I guess I was
    trying to
    reduce the weight enough to slide the thing. Now that I have the crane,
    I won't
    be doing that sort of insanity any more.

    Jon
     
  17. On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 21:42:19 GMT, Ignoramus23984
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I am soon going to pick up six devices, each is a rectangular shape
    >approximately 2x1.5x1 foot. Each weighs 150 lbs. I hope that the
    >seller will load them into my pickup with a forklift, but unloading is
    >where I have my doubts. I could unload them with a chain hoist or a
    >"shop crane", but that is a hassle.
    >
    >I do generally deadlift 170 lbs, but I am a little afraid that
    >unloading is a different kind of movement and is more injury prone. I
    >am not really all that worried to damage the devices, each cost me
    >around $6, but I do not want to get injured.
    >
    >So, I am looking for some simple unloading ideas that could make it a
    >little safer. Such as, perhaps, to put a "step" close to the tailgate
    >so that I could first lower the thing on that step, and only then to
    >the dolly.
    >
    >Maybe I am just a wuss and unloading should be no problem, but I
    >wanted to check with knowledgeable people.
    >
    >Any thoughts?
    >
    >i

    Enlist a "slave".
    *** Free account sponsored by SecureIX.com ***
    *** Encrypt your Internet usage with a free VPN account from http://www.SecureIX.com ***
     
  18. On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 21:42:19 GMT, Ignoramus23984
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Any thoughts?


    You're a twat.
     
  19. "Ignoramus23984" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:%[email protected]
    >I am soon going to pick up six devices, each is a rectangular shape
    > approximately 2x1.5x1 foot. Each weighs 150 lbs. I hope that the
    > seller will load them into my pickup with a forklift, but unloading is
    > where I have my doubts. I could unload them with a chain hoist or a
    > "shop crane", but that is a hassle.
    >
    > I do generally deadlift 170 lbs, but I am a little afraid that
    > unloading is a different kind of movement and is more injury prone. I
    > am not really all that worried to damage the devices, each cost me
    > around $6, but I do not want to get injured.
    >
    > So, I am looking for some simple unloading ideas that could make it a
    > little safer. Such as, perhaps, to put a "step" close to the tailgate
    > so that I could first lower the thing on that step, and only then to
    > the dolly.
    >
    > Maybe I am just a wuss and unloading should be no problem, but I
    > wanted to check with knowledgeable people.
    >
    > Any thoughts?
    >
    > i


    when i bought my large compressor, the delivery guy got it off the semi onto
    the ground just by carefully balancing it on the edge, and lowering it
    gently. use leverage, the overall weight won't be that much until you get
    close to the ground. a couple of ramps should do it. at that point, a simple
    hand cart would move them pretty easily. you can get an 800 lb handcart at
    HF for under $30 when they're on sale.
     
  20. Pete C.

    Pete C. Guest

    Ignoramus23984 wrote:
    >
    > I am soon going to pick up six devices, each is a rectangular shape
    > approximately 2x1.5x1 foot. Each weighs 150 lbs. I hope that the
    > seller will load them into my pickup with a forklift, but unloading is
    > where I have my doubts. I could unload them with a chain hoist or a
    > "shop crane", but that is a hassle.
    >
    > I do generally deadlift 170 lbs, but I am a little afraid that
    > unloading is a different kind of movement and is more injury prone. I
    > am not really all that worried to damage the devices, each cost me
    > around $6, but I do not want to get injured.
    >
    > So, I am looking for some simple unloading ideas that could make it a
    > little safer. Such as, perhaps, to put a "step" close to the tailgate
    > so that I could first lower the thing on that step, and only then to
    > the dolly.
    >
    > Maybe I am just a wuss and unloading should be no problem, but I
    > wanted to check with knowledgeable people.
    >
    > Any thoughts?
    >
    > i


    Perhaps get yourself one of those 500# cap hitch mount lift gates that
    Harbor Freight has for a couple hundred $. I've heard reports that they
    work well and have seen them myself in the store and they looked pretty
    decent. The only reason I didn't get one myself is I already have a
    forklift for unloading.

    Pete C.
     
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