handling a workplace without showers?

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by parawolf, Jan 29, 2007.

  1. parawolf

    parawolf New Member

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    How do you (if at all) handle working in a location that does not offer shower facilities? I've been head hunted for a position at a place that I know quite of a few people, however they have no shower facilities and no bike facilites what so ever.

    Also this place of employment is about 30km one way from my house, so it could turn out that if I commuted anyway that the large time on the bike could turn into junk k's, and potentially could require to be transporting a laptop and gear.

    Currently I do not own a car, and this new job would require one (not a bad thing, they pay an allowance for it). So that at least could then give me some freedom to put the bike in the car to/from work and then do some proper training runs (say Tuesday night crit's at Sandown with CCCC), to boost the 'quality' of training time rather than potentially large junk k's with commuting.

    So how do you deal with the shower issue? and what kind of car would you as a cyclist get (assume ~$40k new), i'm thinking second hand/ex-demo, and what is perking my mind is something like a Toyota Yaris or splash out a bit and get a VW Polo GTI. The best car in the range, and very popular with cyclists appears to be the Subaru Liberty/Outback/Forester. Good cars, just expensive.
     
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  2. petulance

    petulance Guest

    On Jan 30, 8:54 am, parawolf <[email protected]
    mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote:
    > and what kind of car would
    > you as a cyclist get (assume ~$40k new), i'm thinking second
    > hand/ex-demo, and what is perking my mind is something like a Toyota
    > Yaris or splash out a bit and get a VW Polo GTI. The best car in the
    > range, and very popular with cyclists appears to be the Subaru
    > Liberty/Outback/Forester. Good cars, just expensive.
    >


    Bloody hell, you have lots of choice for $40k.

    Subarus are good. I can fit my road bike into the back of an Impreza
    with the rear seats folded down without taking the bike's front wheel
    off. Unfortunately, I have to take the front wheel off my mountain
    bike when I put that bike in the back.

    A Forester shares the same platform as the Impreza. The Outback is a
    raised version of the Liberty with slightly better undercarriage
    protection (not that you want to take it bush bashing though).

    You have to ask yourself if you really need a wagon. I haven't driven
    an Outback or Liberty before, but the Imprezas and Foresters are nice
    small cars to drive.

    The problem with Subarus (especially Imprezas) is they hold their
    value too well. I have been looking around for another one (though I
    don't even have half your budget to spend!) and the ones on the second
    hand market are pretty pricey. I mean, $15k for a '99 Impreza RX with
    147k km on the odometer???

    Subarus apart, any hatchback should do. If you want the extra space in
    the back then you can consider getting roof rack carriers or a tow
    ball carrier. I was always hesitant driving about town with 2 bikes on
    the tow ball carrier but I haven't managed to ding my bikes yet.

    Oh, and Jeremy Clarkson likes the Polo GTI ...
     
  3. LotteBum

    LotteBum New Member

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    Personally, I'd never buy a second hand car again (but that's just me), so I'd be tempted by the Yaris - that way you have your 3 year, 100,000km warranty which is far better than the so called 3 year warranty on used cars (which require you to service them with the dealer, which is ridiculous).

    My mum and sister both drive a Yaris and they love them. Great on fuel too - a lot better than a bigger Subaru.

    Lotte
     
  4. Donga

    Donga Guest

    On Jan 29, 4:54 pm, parawolf <[email protected]
    mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote:
    > How do you (if at all) handle working in a location that does not offer
    > shower facilities? I've been head hunted for a position at a place that
    > I know quite of a few people, however they have no shower facilities and
    > no bike facilites what so ever.
    >
    > Also this place of employment is about 30km one way from my house, so
    > it could turn out that if I commuted anyway that the large time on the
    > bike could turn into junk k's, and potentially could require to be
    > transporting a laptop and gear.
    >
    > Currently I do not own a car, and this new job would require one (not a
    > bad thing, they pay an allowance for it). So that at least could then
    > give me some freedom to put the bike in the car to/from work and then
    > do some proper training runs (say Tuesday night crit's at Sandown with
    > CCCC), to boost the 'quality' of training time rather than potentially
    > large junk k's with commuting.
    >
    > So how do you deal with the shower issue? and what kind of car would
    > you as a cyclist get (assume ~$40k new), i'm thinking second
    > hand/ex-demo, and what is perking my mind is something like a Toyota
    > Yaris or splash out a bit and get a VW Polo GTI. The best car in the
    > range, and very popular with cyclists appears to be the Subaru
    > Liberty/Outback/Forester. Good cars, just expensive.
    >
    > --
    > parawolf


    Puzzled - what's a junk km? The only one I've ever done is one in a
    car, when I could have been riding.

    Donga
     
  5. Tamyka Bell

    Tamyka Bell Guest

    Donga wrote:
    >
    > On Jan 29, 4:54 pm, parawolf <[email protected]
    > mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote:
    > > How do you (if at all) handle working in a location that does not offer
    > > shower facilities? I've been head hunted for a position at a place that
    > > I know quite of a few people, however they have no shower facilities and
    > > no bike facilites what so ever.
    > >
    > > Also this place of employment is about 30km one way from my house, so
    > > it could turn out that if I commuted anyway that the large time on the
    > > bike could turn into junk k's, and potentially could require to be
    > > transporting a laptop and gear.
    > >
    > > Currently I do not own a car, and this new job would require one (not a
    > > bad thing, they pay an allowance for it). So that at least could then
    > > give me some freedom to put the bike in the car to/from work and then
    > > do some proper training runs (say Tuesday night crit's at Sandown with
    > > CCCC), to boost the 'quality' of training time rather than potentially
    > > large junk k's with commuting.
    > >
    > > So how do you deal with the shower issue? and what kind of car would
    > > you as a cyclist get (assume ~$40k new), i'm thinking second
    > > hand/ex-demo, and what is perking my mind is something like a Toyota
    > > Yaris or splash out a bit and get a VW Polo GTI. The best car in the
    > > range, and very popular with cyclists appears to be the Subaru
    > > Liberty/Outback/Forester. Good cars, just expensive.
    > >
    > > --
    > > parawolf

    >
    > Puzzled - what's a junk km? The only one I've ever done is one in a
    > car, when I could have been riding.
    >
    > Donga


    I know that my 28km commutes (with backpack) were fantastic
    training and the surges in traffic got me ready to race some
    low grade crits!

    Tam
     
  6. thefathippy

    thefathippy Guest

    On Jan 30, 8:54 am, parawolf <[email protected]
    mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote:
    > How do you (if at all) handle working in a location that does not offer
    > shower facilities? I've been head hunted for a position at a place that
    > I know quite of a few people, however they have no shower facilities and
    > no bike facilites what so ever.


    I used to lock the toilet door and have a sponge bath, utilising the
    hand washing basin. Nowadays I work for somewhere with showers.

    You could try nearby gyms - maybe you could buy a "shower membership"?

    HTH

    Tony F
    www.thefathippy.com
     
  7. SomeGuy

    SomeGuy New Member

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    Is there a gym or other shower facilities near this new work you could use?

    I find carrying a laptop isn't a problem, just stick it in a pannier.
     
  8. slaw

    slaw New Member

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    Riding less than 20km or so for a commute, I don't normally shower. I just change and if it is a bit hotter, I'll use body wipes for a quick clean. I would usually ride a bit gentler on the way in compared to the ride home.

    I usually carried a laptop daily in a decent backpack (Deuter Qasar) that has a mesh framed back to avoid having the hard laptop against the spine and for ventilation. I prefer the backpack to putting it in the panniers as I sometimes ride on some dirt tracks on my commute, but for comfort, the laptop in a padded bag in a pannier would be prefered.

    We've had a Subaru Liberty for the last 10 years, and while it is a comfortable ride, it has been pretty expensive to maintain. Fuel consumption is fair, but services and repairs have cost us a heap over that time. Next car for us might be a diesel, Hyundai Sante Fe, VW Passat wagon, Mazda 6 wagon etc...
     
  9. cfsmtb

    cfsmtb New Member

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    And if anyone knows about, or has, access to a (reasonably priced) air suspension system replacement for a '92 Liberty, please contact Mr Bikesoiler. The damn things akin to riding a ironing board at the mo. pffff maybe should be x-posting this to the aus.cars circus. ;)
     
  10. EuanB

    EuanB New Member

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    I joined a nearby gym. At 60 odd bucks a month it was still way cheaper than PT or buying a car.

    If you have to buy a car, fair enough, but do you? Would taxis do the job for you? I guess I'm lucky because I was an incumbent when work decided that they needed 24/7 recall. I said fine, don't expect me to buy a car though, you want me then you'd better get me a taxi. In the long run it works out a lot cheaper for the business and me that way.


    They could.... ;-) but then again if you planned it right it could turn in to valuable training. I did ATB in under eight hours, the only training I did was riding to and from work. Wonder what will happen if I manage to get some structure in to my riding?


    I'd seriously think about getting a rack and panniers. Your back will thank you for it.

    We've found the Toyota Corolla to be an excellent car. For short trips we put the bikes in the back no problem (have to take the front wheel off) and for longer trips we use an Allen strap on rack which does the job well.

    My boss's brother-in-law has a Corolla with 350,000 on the clock, fuel economy not bad and safety wise it's up there with the best.

    Vlad's got a Golf, not sure if it's a GTI. I know that on one trip to Beechworth he managed two mountain bikes, luggage for two, coffee machine and the kitchen sink (joking on the last one but the coffee machine's true) in the back. Looked like a three dimensional jigsaw but he got it all in.

    HTH.
     
  11. In aus.bicycle on Tue, 30 Jan 2007 08:54:09 +1100
    parawolf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > Also this place of employment is about 30km one way from my house, so
    > it could turn out that if I commuted anyway that the large time on the
    > bike could turn into junk k's, and potentially could require to be
    > transporting a laptop and gear.


    Well.. junk kms are what you make them.. IN 30km can't you work out
    a training routine that doesnt take the edge off? Work on sprints and
    so on? If you are transporting a laptop, backpacks work, or plenty of
    panniers available. Buy a commuting bike rather than using your race
    bike, don't you need another bike? (Think sideways - cross train on a
    recumbent!
    http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0NHF/is_12_19/ai_86708371)



    I think being without a shower is doable but you have to want to.
    Basin baths are tedious but you can do them quickly enough if you keep
    a decent size bowl at work and you have somewhere with enough room
    that you can occupy for say 15 mins. Fill sink with hot water, put
    some soapy water in bowl, stand in bowl, rub self down with soapy
    water and cloth, rinse from clean water. Have a cup to throw clean
    water on you. I suspect that you'd find that too tedious to do day in
    day out.

    If they are interested in you, ask them about showers. Ask if there
    are any anywhere in the building, sports centre nearby, can they find
    you some.

    Car wise, get one that's cheap to insure. Anything can carry a rack
    on roof or rear, but the dead costs like insurance are horrible.

    Or think even more sideways - get a scooter for the work commute rather
    than a car. Or a 250cc bike and buy a small trailer from easytrailer
    to take the bicycle places when you need to. Heaps less to buy, less
    dead cost, and probably less running cost, depending on the bike.


    Zebee
     
  12. jur

    jur New Member

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    Oh I just have to chime in, having done the bird bath routine for 2 years now. I find I prefer it over a full shower at work - much quicker, less water, less hassle, feel just as fresh as a full shower.

    Rather than do Zeebee's cumbersome routine, here's what i do:

    When arriving at work, dry head with very small sports towel (you know the quick-dry type, I cut mine smaller to 30x40cm).
    Run HOT water in basin, add 3-4 squirts of hand washing soap.
    Rinse towel, rub face and hair clean.
    Strip shirt off.
    Rinse towel, rub armpits clean.
    RT, rub arms.
    RT, rub body.
    RT, rub back.
    RT, rub legs up to crotch level.
    RT, wring out to dry.

    I don't wear knicks commuting (my brooks saddles are very comfy, no need). I have done so on a few occasions, if so, for the final rub I retreat into a toilet cubicle to change into my pants and then have the opportunity to rub as well.

    Quick blast of deodorant, put on my work duds and I'm done. the towel hangs to dry in my cubicle, ready for the next day.

    This routine is quicker than a shower and certainly less hassle for me. I feel clean and don't stink my workmates out of the office.

    I discovered we have a shower at work about a year after we moved into the new building, but I'd gotten used to the bird bath and now prefer it. And it will serve me well on my forthcoming Tassie tour.
     
  13. BT Humble

    BT Humble Guest

    EuanB
    > We've found the Toyota Corolla to be an excellent car. For short trips
    > we put the bikes in the back no problem (have to take the front wheel
    > off) and for longer trips we use an Allen strap on rack which does the
    > job well.
    >
    > My boss's brother-in-law has a Corolla with 350,000 on the clock, fuel
    > economy not bad and safety wise it's up there with the best.


    Corollas have a reputation for lasting a long time without many
    issues. I had an '88 that I sold with 260,000km on the clock, and the
    only problems I had with it were the "long term consumables" you'd
    expect on any 10-year-old car (radiator clean, new alternator, aircon
    re-gas, new heater/radiator hoses).


    BTH
     
  14. LotteBum

    LotteBum New Member

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    Although, like I said, I wouldn't buy a second hand car again, if I had to recommend a second hand car to anyone, I'd definitely say a Corolla. Had an 83 model, a 92 model and now a 2004 model which was bought brand new. Other than basic wear and tear, they're quiet and reliable. You can't go wrong with one of those.

    I'm liking the tips for basin baths in here guys. Very informative.

    Cheers,
    Lotte
     
  15. Dave

    Dave Guest

    On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 14:14:20 -0800, petulance wrote:

    > You have to ask yourself if you really need a wagon. I haven't driven
    > an Outback or Liberty before, but the Imprezas and Foresters are nice
    > small cars to drive.



    Having traded an Impreza for an Outback to allow easier transport of
    kids + assorted required stuff, they're not that bad to drive. Certainly
    bigger and thirstier, but in some cases I reckon the Outback handles
    better than a non-turbo Impreza (the sway bars count for a lot).

    AWD costs you weight and fuel efficiency, but is nice in adverse
    conditions. Otherwise a small/medium hatch is a good option. I know you
    can get 2 people + 2 MTBs in a 5 door Yaris without any real hassle.

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    Flagrant system error! The system is down. I dunno what you did,
    moron, but you sure screwed everything up - Strongbad
     
  16. flyingdutch

    flyingdutch New Member

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    Heyzoos!
    Leave you people alone for a day and your debating which car some sandbagger :)D) should [email protected][email protected]$^!^!$!$!!!!!

    30km. 'junk' miles???????

    only if you ride 'em like junk!
    if you are serious about makig the leap from Cgrade up, you better get used to 'junk' miles, laddy!

    Besides, if his job is soooooooooo darned worth your while incoveniencing yourself, it sounds like you'll need the stress-relieving ride on the way home.
     
  17. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    On Jan 30, 8:54 am, parawolf <[email protected]
    mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote:
    > How do you (if at all) handle working in a location that does not offer
    > shower facilities? I've been head hunted for a position at a place that
    > I know quite of a few people, however they have no shower facilities and
    > no bike facilites what so ever.
    >
    > Also this place of employment is about 30km one way from my house, so
    > it could turn out that if I commuted anyway that the large time on the
    > bike could turn into junk k's, and potentially could require to be
    > transporting a laptop and gear.
    >
    > Currently I do not own a car, and this new job would require one (not a
    > bad thing, they pay an allowance for it). So that at least could then
    > give me some freedom to put the bike in the car to/from work and then
    > do some proper training runs (say Tuesday night crit's at Sandown with
    > CCCC), to boost the 'quality' of training time rather than potentially
    > large junk k's with commuting.
    >
    > So how do you deal with the shower issue? and what kind of car would
    > you as a cyclist get (assume ~$40k new), i'm thinking second
    > hand/ex-demo, and what is perking my mind is something like a Toyota
    > Yaris or splash out a bit and get a VW Polo GTI. The best car in the
    > range, and very popular with cyclists appears to be the Subaru
    > Liberty/Outback/Forester. Good cars, just expensive.


    I don't own a car, I have a can of destinkorant at my main client site
    (22km from home), and a change of clothes. I get to work, after
    taking the last k or so pretty easy, sit down for 10 mins or so to
    cool down, then get changed.

    No worries ...
     
  18. Bleve

    Bleve Guest

    On Jan 30, 10:20 am, "Donga" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Jan 29, 4:54 pm, parawolf <[email protected]
    >
    >
    >
    > mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote:
    > > How do you (if at all) handle working in a location that does not offer
    > > shower facilities? I've been head hunted for a position at a place that
    > > I know quite of a few people, however they have no shower facilities and
    > > no bike facilites what so ever.

    >
    > > Also this place of employment is about 30km one way from my house, so
    > > it could turn out that if I commuted anyway that the large time on the
    > > bike could turn into junk k's, and potentially could require to be
    > > transporting a laptop and gear.

    >
    > > Currently I do not own a car, and this new job would require one (not a
    > > bad thing, they pay an allowance for it). So that at least could then
    > > give me some freedom to put the bike in the car to/from work and then
    > > do some proper training runs (say Tuesday night crit's at Sandown with
    > > CCCC), to boost the 'quality' of training time rather than potentially
    > > large junk k's with commuting.

    >
    > > So how do you deal with the shower issue? and what kind of car would
    > > you as a cyclist get (assume ~$40k new), i'm thinking second
    > > hand/ex-demo, and what is perking my mind is something like a Toyota
    > > Yaris or splash out a bit and get a VW Polo GTI. The best car in the
    > > range, and very popular with cyclists appears to be the Subaru
    > > Liberty/Outback/Forester. Good cars, just expensive.

    >
    > > --
    > > parawolf

    >
    > Puzzled - what's a junk km? The only one I've ever done is one in a
    > car, when I could have been riding.


    junk miles are miles with no quality - eg: you've done a few intervals
    or something, and have clocked up 95km, but you want to be able to put
    100km in your diary, so you ride around in circles for 5km (we've all
    done it :) ).

    Junk miles are therefore k's with no real purpose. Commuters don't
    really care, but if you're training for racing, junk miles are like
    empty calories, they taste good but don't do you any good.
     
  19. K.A. Moylan

    K.A. Moylan Guest

    In article <>, parawolf <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > How do you (if at all) handle working in a location that does not offer
    > shower facilities? I've been head hunted for a position at a place that
    > I know quite of a few people, however they have no shower facilities and
    > no bike facilites what so ever.
    > ...
    > Currently I do not own a car, and this new job would require one (not a
    > bad thing, they pay an allowance for it). So that at least could then
    > give me some freedom to put the bike in the car to/from work and then
    > ...
    > So how do you deal with the shower issue? and what kind of car would
    > you as a cyclist get (assume ~$40k new), i'm thinking second
    > hand/ex-demo, and what is perking my mind is something like a Toyota
    > Yaris or splash out a bit and get a VW Polo GTI. The best car in the
    > range, and very popular with cyclists appears to be the Subaru
    > Liberty/Outback/Forester. Good cars, just expensive.


    Regardless of model, you will find a station wagon better than a sedan +
    bike carrier. I just throw the bike into the back of the wagon & I'm
    off, as opposed to fiddling around with getting the bike onto the rack &
    ensuring it will stay there.

    HTH.

    --
    K.A. Moylan
    Canberra, Australia
    Ski Club: http://www.cccsc.asn.au
    kamoylan at ozemail dot com dot au
     
  20. RobWoozle

    RobWoozle Guest

    Well, I have a Yaris and if you want a good deal on buying it let me
    know (I'm serious).

    In terms of bicycle transport it is very good. THe rear seats fold
    completely flat and my bikes fit in easily (sans front wheel
    naturally).

    As for the showers, I worked with a guy who "washed" in a sink every
    morning when he came into work. Probably easier to go for a ride
    before going home!

    Cheers,
    Rob
     
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