Hands get sore

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Chris Hansen, Apr 27, 2004.

  1. Chris Hansen

    Chris Hansen Guest

    Hello,

    When I'm riding my hands get sore before my rear. I assume this means
    I have too much weight on my hands. Should I raise the handlebar or is
    there something else to look at?

    Thanks.
     
    Tags:


  2. On 27 Apr 2004 14:56:49 -0700, [email protected] (Chris
    Hansen) wrote in message
    <[email protected]>:

    >When I'm riding my hands get sore before my rear. I assume this means
    >I have too much weight on my hands. Should I raise the handlebar or is
    >there something else to look at?


    Yes, it's called a recumbent, where neither your hands nor your rear
    get sore ;-)

    --
    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
  3. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Chris Hansen wrote:
    :: Hello,
    ::
    :: When I'm riding my hands get sore before my rear. I assume this means
    :: I have too much weight on my hands. Should I raise the handlebar or
    :: is there something else to look at?
    ::
    :: Thanks.

    gloves..& ...move your hands frequently.
     
  4. Actually34

    Actually34 Guest

    Yes, gloves help. Also, you don't specify what kind of handlebars you have. One
    of the reasons I switched back to a bike with dropped handlebars was that
    dropped bars provide more hand positions
     
  5. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > Hello,
    >
    > When I'm riding my hands get sore before my rear. I assume this means
    > I have too much weight on my hands. Should I raise the handlebar or is
    > there something else to look at?


    Raising the bar is usually the first thing to try, but moving the saddle
    forward is also an option. You could also be sure you are moving your
    hands around to different positions. If you have bars which don't offer
    multiple positions, you could try drop bars in order to get some
    options.

    --
    Dave Kerber
    Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  6. Chris Hansen wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > When I'm riding my hands get sore before my rear. I assume this means
    > I have too much weight on my hands. Should I raise the handlebar or is
    > there something else to look at?
    >
    > Thanks.


    Make sure the saddle is not tilted forwards, but is closer to level.
     
  7. Jacobe Hazzard wrote:
    >
    > Make sure the saddle is not tilted forwards, but is closer to level.


    And if it's your hands, rather than your wrists that are sore, try not to
    grip the bars too tightly.
     
  8. "Chris Hansen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hello,
    >
    > When I'm riding my hands get sore before my rear. I assume this means
    > I have too much weight on my hands. Should I raise the handlebar or is
    > there something else to look at?
    >
    > Thanks.


    You've probably already done this, but I rode for 3k miles with various
    aches and pains (hands included) until I finally coughed up the money for a
    professional fit. I ended up moving EVERYTHING, and none of it very far,
    but what a difference it made to my butt, hands, legs, knees, you name it.
     
  9. If you aren't wearing gloves, do so - lots of different kinds available. In
    summer I use Altura progel mitts and love them. In cooler times I use Pearl
    Izumi AmFib Glove and love them - warm, dry and lots of movement allowed.

    Cheers, helen s





    --This is an invalid email address to avoid spam--
    to get correct one remove fame & fortune
    h*$el*$$e*nd**$o$ts**i*$*$m*m$o*n*[email protected]$*a$o*l.c**$om$

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  10. Yuri Budilov

    Yuri Budilov Guest

    in addition the different length (likely shorter?) stem may help too. In my
    case a 10 mm shorter stem and sliding the seat a bit forward (10 mm) helped.

    "David Kerber" <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > When I'm riding my hands get sore before my rear. I assume this means
    > > I have too much weight on my hands. Should I raise the handlebar or is
    > > there something else to look at?

    >
    > Raising the bar is usually the first thing to try, but moving the saddle
    > forward is also an option. You could also be sure you are moving your
    > hands around to different positions. If you have bars which don't offer
    > multiple positions, you could try drop bars in order to get some
    > options.
    >
    > --
    > Dave Kerber
    > Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!
    >
    > REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  11. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > in addition the different length (likely shorter?) stem may help too. In my
    > case a 10 mm shorter stem and sliding the seat a bit forward (10 mm) helped.


    Yeah, I forgot that one, but it's a common fix.

    .....

    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
  12. Chris Hansen

    Chris Hansen Guest

    Sorry, I should have given more information.

    I ride a road bike (an old Shcwinn LeTour that I inherited from a
    family member) with drop handlebars. I also wear gloves. The
    handlebars are about 1 inch lower than the saddle which seems
    comfortable. I also put on wider handlebars and a little longer stem
    because it felt short and narrow, it seems much easier to breath
    deeply now. I read that if you lift your hands off the handlebars you
    should be able to hold that position with little effort but when I try
    I tend to slide forward on the seat. I tried moving the seat forward
    but then I find I'm always scooting back, especially up hills.

    Is there anything else that might be significant?

    Thanks for all the input.
     
  13. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Chris Hansen wrote:

    >Sorry, I should have given more information.
    >
    >I ride a road bike (an old Shcwinn LeTour that I inherited from a
    >family member) with drop handlebars. I also wear gloves. The
    >handlebars are about 1 inch lower than the saddle which seems
    >comfortable. I also put on wider handlebars and a little longer stem
    >because it felt short and narrow, it seems much easier to breath
    >deeply now. I read that if you lift your hands off the handlebars you
    >should be able to hold that position with little effort but when I try
    >I tend to slide forward on the seat. I tried moving the seat forward
    >but then I find I'm always scooting back, especially up hills.
    >
    >Is there anything else that might be significant?
    >
    >Thanks for all the input.
    >

    #1 thing that comes to mind is to level the seat. Dead level may not be
    perfect, but it's the logical place to start. What you describe is how
    I felt when my seat was tilted forward instead of very close to dead level.
    Start level and adjust for personal preferences in very small increments.
    Best regards, Bernie
     
  14. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > Sorry, I should have given more information.
    >
    > I ride a road bike (an old Shcwinn LeTour that I inherited from a
    > family member) with drop handlebars. I also wear gloves. The
    > handlebars are about 1 inch lower than the saddle which seems
    > comfortable. I also put on wider handlebars and a little longer stem
    > because it felt short and narrow, it seems much easier to breath
    > deeply now. I read that if you lift your hands off the handlebars you
    > should be able to hold that position with little effort but when I try
    > I tend to slide forward on the seat. I tried moving the seat forward
    > but then I find I'm always scooting back, especially up hills.
    >
    > Is there anything else that might be significant?


    YOu still might look at putting the shorter stem back on, and/or raising
    the bars an inch (to be level with the saddle).

    >
    > Thanks for all the input.
    >


    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
  15. Yuri Budilov

    Yuri Budilov Guest

    Is your stem currently angled up or down?

    Personal experience, and I do assume your bike frame is the right size for
    you.....

    My stem was initially angled 5 degrees down so I flipped it and it is now
    facing 5 degrees upward i.e. 10 degree angle difference. Together with 10 mm
    shorter stem and adjusting the seat (slide it forward by about 10 mm) it
    seemed to do the trick for me.

    You may also twist the handle bar a little bit upwards so that your brake
    hoods are a touch higher - just don't go to extremes i.e. the drops line
    should be horizontal to road surface or pointed a little bit down toward the
    derailer.

    Of course you may need to do the reverse i.e. longer stem, slide the seat
    backward etc. If you have competent LBS it may be worth seeking their
    opinion.

    YMMV
    cheers

    "Chris Hansen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Sorry, I should have given more information.
    >
    > I ride a road bike (an old Shcwinn LeTour that I inherited from a
    > family member) with drop handlebars. I also wear gloves. The
    > handlebars are about 1 inch lower than the saddle which seems
    > comfortable. I also put on wider handlebars and a little longer stem
    > because it felt short and narrow, it seems much easier to breath
    > deeply now. I read that if you lift your hands off the handlebars you
    > should be able to hold that position with little effort but when I try
    > I tend to slide forward on the seat. I tried moving the seat forward
    > but then I find I'm always scooting back, especially up hills.
    >
    > Is there anything else that might be significant?
    >
    > Thanks for all the input.
     
  16. Chris Hansen

    Chris Hansen Guest

    > #1 thing that comes to mind is to level the seat.

    I checked the seat and it's tilted up as far as it will go which
    brings it to about level. When I ride no handed and sit upright I
    still feel like I slide forward a little. I wonder if a different seat
    will help?
     
  17. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 1 May 2004 11:50:05 -0700, [email protected] (Chris
    Hansen) wrote:
    >> #1 thing that comes to mind is to level the seat.

    >
    >I checked the seat and it's tilted up as far as it will go which
    >brings it to about level. When I ride no handed and sit upright I
    >still feel like I slide forward a little. I wonder if a different seat
    >will help?


    Is your seatpost backwards?
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  18. Badger_South

    Badger_South Guest

    On Sat, 01 May 2004 17:30:32 -0400, Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 1 May 2004 11:50:05 -0700, [email protected] (Chris
    >Hansen) wrote:
    >>> #1 thing that comes to mind is to level the seat.

    >>
    >>I checked the seat and it's tilted up as far as it will go which
    >>brings it to about level. When I ride no handed and sit upright I
    >>still feel like I slide forward a little. I wonder if a different seat
    >>will help?

    >
    >Is your seatpost backwards?


    Sounds like he has a right seatpost in a left-posted bike... ;-)

    -B
     
  19. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Sat, 01 May 2004 17:53:56 -0400, Badger_South <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >On Sat, 01 May 2004 17:30:32 -0400, Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>Is your seatpost backwards?

    >
    >Sounds like he has a right seatpost in a left-posted bike... ;-)


    Actually, I meant it seriously. I have a seatpost that has the clamp
    off-center of the post body (like most); if you mount it with the
    clamp forward, it can't get quite level.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
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