Hands off steering

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Tom Kunich, Apr 10, 2006.

  1. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    Remember when that Japanese kid on Discovery had his stem come off?
    Remember when he allowed himself to slowly steer out of the group
    before he crashed so that everyone else got away clean?

    That's precisely what George did yesterday. He couldn't steer so he sat
    up and held his arms out to balance the bike and steered it out of the
    group and so crashed alone. It demonstrated a level of expertise far
    away from most piddling players like those here.

    Too bad so many professionals nitwits here, who don't spend more time
    riding than posting, couldn't see that.
     
    Tags:


  2. Tom Kunich wrote:
    > Remember when that Japanese kid on Discovery had his stem come off?
    > Remember when he allowed himself to slowly steer out of the group
    > before he crashed so that everyone else got away clean?
    >
    > That's precisely what George did yesterday. He couldn't steer so he sat
    > up and held his arms out to balance the bike and steered it out of the
    > group and so crashed alone. It demonstrated a level of expertise far
    > away from most piddling players like those here.
    >
    > Too bad so many professionals nitwits here, who don't spend more time
    > riding than posting, couldn't see that.


    You actually believe that Hincapie "steered" his bike to the side of
    the road so as to not crash any other riders???

    MUCH more likely that he sat up in surprise, and the bike turned to the
    left as that's the way his wheel deflected after hitting the first
    cobble AFTER the steerer tube broke. On a smooth road he MAY have been
    able to influence the trajectory of his bike, but on the cobbles he was
    at the mercy of the stones. It was sheer dumb luck that he fell to the
    left and didn't crash anyone else.

    Fred
     
  3. [email protected] wrote:
    > Tom Kunich wrote:
    >
    >>Remember when that Japanese kid on Discovery had his stem come off?
    >>Remember when he allowed himself to slowly steer out of the group
    >>before he crashed so that everyone else got away clean?
    >>
    >>That's precisely what George did yesterday. He couldn't steer so he sat
    >>up and held his arms out to balance the bike and steered it out of the
    >>group and so crashed alone. It demonstrated a level of expertise far
    >>away from most piddling players like those here.
    >>
    >>Too bad so many professionals nitwits here, who don't spend more time
    >>riding than posting, couldn't see that.

    >
    >
    > You actually believe that Hincapie "steered" his bike to the side of
    > the road so as to not crash any other riders???
    >
    > MUCH more likely that he sat up in surprise, and the bike turned to the
    > left as that's the way his wheel deflected after hitting the first
    > cobble AFTER the steerer tube broke. On a smooth road he MAY have been
    > able to influence the trajectory of his bike, but on the cobbles he was
    > at the mercy of the stones. It was sheer dumb luck that he fell to the
    > left and didn't crash anyone else.


    You can see his head (behind the front riders) drop just as the steerer
    snapped - quite a feat not to lose it right there and surprising that he
    was able to sit up. It did look like he was trying to aim for the ditch
    after that (whether for a somewhat softer landing or to get out of the
    way or both) but it was probably just luck that he sort of got there
    without taking anyone else down.
     
  4. RicodJour

    RicodJour Guest

    MagillaGorilla wrote:
    >
    > Hincapie looked gay when he fell.


    An observation:
    - you mention homosexuals in pretty much every post. A different sort
    might try to point out that such behavior is almost always indicative
    of latent and frustrated desires...not that there's anything wrong with
    that.

    A question:
    - when did you start awarding style points for crashing? A different
    sort might point out that such concern for all things stylistic is
    indicative of latent and frustrated desires.

    R
     
  5. Geraard Spergen wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    > > Tom Kunich wrote:
    > >
    > >>Remember when that Japanese kid on Discovery had his stem come off?
    > >>Remember when he allowed himself to slowly steer out of the group
    > >>before he crashed so that everyone else got away clean?
    > >>
    > >>That's precisely what George did yesterday. He couldn't steer so he sat
    > >>up and held his arms out to balance the bike and steered it out of the
    > >>group and so crashed alone. It demonstrated a level of expertise far
    > >>away from most piddling players like those here.
    > >>
    > >>Too bad so many professionals nitwits here, who don't spend more time
    > >>riding than posting, couldn't see that.

    > >
    > >
    > > You actually believe that Hincapie "steered" his bike to the side of
    > > the road so as to not crash any other riders???
    > >
    > > MUCH more likely that he sat up in surprise, and the bike turned to the
    > > left as that's the way his wheel deflected after hitting the first
    > > cobble AFTER the steerer tube broke. On a smooth road he MAY have been
    > > able to influence the trajectory of his bike, but on the cobbles he was
    > > at the mercy of the stones. It was sheer dumb luck that he fell to the
    > > left and didn't crash anyone else.

    >
    > You can see his head (behind the front riders) drop just as the steerer
    > snapped - quite a feat not to lose it right there and surprising that he
    > was able to sit up. It did look like he was trying to aim for the ditch
    > after that (whether for a somewhat softer landing or to get out of the
    > way or both) but it was probably just luck that he sort of got there
    > without taking anyone else down.


    I wouldn't confuse veering toward the ditch with steering toward the
    ditch. The cobbles sent Hincapie that way, not any miraculous bike
    handling skill he may or not possess.

    Funny thing about the situation as Kunich describes it, you'd think
    that by virtue of putting in lot's of miles that Hincapie, or pros in
    general, would have some inate ability to deal with a broken steerer
    tube that the typical rider wouldn't have. Nonsense. Unless Hincapie
    as been specifically practicing falling off a bike with a broken
    steerer tube, he's no more experienced at it than you or I would be.
    15,000 miles of riding every year does NOT prepare you for your first
    broken steerer tube. Hell, he barely had time to crap his pants before
    he was in the ditch, much less have time to influence the outcome of
    the crash.

    Fred
     
  6. On 10 Apr 2006 12:17:35 -0700, "RicodJour" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >A question:
    >- when did you start awarding style points for crashing? A different
    >sort might point out that such concern for all things stylistic is
    >indicative of latent and frustrated desires.


    When you crash a lot, you start to appreciate the little things. That
    and his latent desire to hold up cards.

    Curtis L. Russell
    Odenton, MD (USA)
    Just someone on two wheels...
     
  7. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    Don't demonstrate just what sort of Fred you really are. Pro riders
    fall off dozens of times a year. After falling for the last 13 years or
    more Hincapie has a hell of a lot more "inate ability" to remain calm
    and collected in a crash than some thinks-he-can. No names mentioned of
    course.
     
  8. Tom Kunich wrote:
    > Don't demonstrate just what sort of Fred you really are. Pro riders
    > fall off dozens of times a year. After falling for the last 13 years or
    > more Hincapie has a hell of a lot more "inate ability" to remain calm
    > and collected in a crash than some thinks-he-can. No names mentioned of
    > course.


    If he's such a good rider, how come he falls off so often? BTW, where
    do you get your stats that pro riders (I'm assuming you mean ALL pro
    riders) fall off dozens of times per year?

    You're still an idiot if you think he inately steered his bike to the
    left side of the road to avoid crashing others. He had just about
    enough time to think "oh, shit" then he hit the deck. Period. The
    cobbles sent him to the left, although they could've just as easily
    sent him to the right.

    But, hey, if you think someone who falls off a lot is a better bike
    handler than someone who falls off maybe once every couple of years
    (while riding in excess of 10,000 miles a year) then so be it.

    Fred

    p.s. I'm not a fred. My name's not even Fred, dumbass.
     
  9. RonSonic

    RonSonic Guest

    On Mon, 10 Apr 2006 15:40:02 -0400, Curtis L. Russell <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On 10 Apr 2006 12:17:35 -0700, "RicodJour" <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>A question:
    >>- when did you start awarding style points for crashing? A different
    >>sort might point out that such concern for all things stylistic is
    >>indicative of latent and frustrated desires.

    >
    >When you crash a lot, you start to appreciate the little things. That
    >and his latent desire to hold up cards.


    Not that there's anything wrong with that.

    Ron
     
  10. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > p.s. I'm not a fred. My name's not even Fred, dumbass.


    After comments like those not only did you prove you're a fred but you also
    proved you're a henry.
     
  11. Tom Kunich wrote:
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > > p.s. I'm not a fred. My name's not even Fred, dumbass.

    >
    > After comments like those not only did you prove you're a fred but you also
    > proved you're a henry.


    You just can't stand it, can you? Being wrong, that is.
     
  12. Bret

    Bret Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > Funny thing about the situation as Kunich describes it, you'd think
    > that by virtue of putting in lot's of miles that Hincapie, or pros in
    > general, would have some inate ability to deal with a broken steerer
    > tube that the typical rider wouldn't have. Nonsense. Unless Hincapie
    > as been specifically practicing falling off a bike with a broken
    > steerer tube, he's no more experienced at it than you or I would be.
    > 15,000 miles of riding every year does NOT prepare you for your first
    > broken steerer tube. Hell, he barely had time to crap his pants before
    > he was in the ditch, much less have time to influence the outcome of
    > the crash.
    >
    > Fred


    Agreed. If Hincapie had been practicing this, he'd have already
    learned, the hard way, that he shouldn't have let go of the bars. I
    think they ended up in his front wheel causing the endo at the end of
    his crash. If he'd held on to the bars, he would have fallen on his hip
    instead of his shoulder. I wonder what was running though his mind at
    the time, "What the ... ?! Guess I don't need these any more".

    Bret
     
  13. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > Tom Kunich wrote:
    > > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > > >
    > > > p.s. I'm not a fred. My name's not even Fred, dumbass.

    > >
    > > After comments like those not only did you prove you're a fred but you also
    > > proved you're a henry.

    >
    > You just can't stand it, can you? Being wrong, that is.


    Nah, he just can't acknowledge it. Ever.

    --
    tanx,
    Howard

    Grandma Smith said a curious thing
    Boys must whistle, girls must sing

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
  14. Howard Kveck

    Howard Kveck Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Bret" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > > Funny thing about the situation as Kunich describes it, you'd think
    > > that by virtue of putting in lot's of miles that Hincapie, or pros in
    > > general, would have some inate ability to deal with a broken steerer
    > > tube that the typical rider wouldn't have. Nonsense. Unless Hincapie
    > > as been specifically practicing falling off a bike with a broken
    > > steerer tube, he's no more experienced at it than you or I would be.
    > > 15,000 miles of riding every year does NOT prepare you for your first
    > > broken steerer tube. Hell, he barely had time to crap his pants before
    > > he was in the ditch, much less have time to influence the outcome of
    > > the crash.
    > >
    > > Fred

    >
    > Agreed. If Hincapie had been practicing this, he'd have already
    > learned, the hard way, that he shouldn't have let go of the bars. I
    > think they ended up in his front wheel causing the endo at the end of
    > his crash. If he'd held on to the bars, he would have fallen on his hip
    > instead of his shoulder. I wonder what was running though his mind at
    > the time, "What the ... ?! Guess I don't need these any more".
    >
    > Bret


    If I remember, he had his hands on the tops when it broke, so it could be
    that the bars went rocketing away from him before he had a chance to grab on to
    'em.

    --
    tanx,
    Howard

    Grandma Smith said a curious thing
    Boys must whistle, girls must sing

    remove YOUR SHOES to reply, ok?
     
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