Happy to be ok - this is why helmet cams are helpful.



pwarbi

Well-Known Member
Mar 18, 2015
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While I'm not entirely sure if tracking down the driver and setting him on fire isn't slightly over the top, setting fire to his car with him in it is definitely an option I'd look at. Every time he opened the door to get out you could kick it back shut again.

I'm sure the panic he feels would make him stop and think more about his actions in the future. If he ever manages to get out the burning car that is...
 

Damien Lee

Active Member
May 16, 2015
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I am glad that you made it through that ordeal safely. Having a cam installed on a helmet sure is handy, especially when facing such situations. Good luck with hearing back from the sheriff's department, it doesn't surprise me that this isn't their main priority, as they're probably focused on catching hardened criminals.
 

jimmy484

Member
Dec 17, 2015
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That was a legit "inches away from death" moment. Glad you came out of it OK. Can't believe that even on such clear, straight roads like that a driver would be so reckless to do something so dangerous. Not OK at all.....
 

maydog

Well-Known Member
Feb 5, 2010
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I picked up the police report today. Driver was a male in his 40's with a past history of issues. Suddenly, I feel much luckier.
 
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OursIsTheFury

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Apr 21, 2016
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One of my genuine fears when riding around town is that at any second I may end up getting run over by some careless driver. Good for you thought to have recorded it, maybe you can take it to the local authorities? And yes, bikers really are in danger out there, as our protection only consists of elbow pads and helmets, while everyone else is protected by a large vehicle made of steel. This is why I do all my runs in the morning, fewer people, fewer cars, fresher air.
 

erook7878

Member
Apr 26, 2016
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I've been lucky to not have any accidents on the road, especially considering the amount of time I've been riding. The closest call I ever had on the street wasn't even on a bike. I had a situation somewhat similar to this on a scooter. I was just riding in the street with a friend and I just didn't hear or see this car coming and took a slight turn to the left and this car just zoomed right by me. My front wheel must have been about a half foot from the car. It's amazing how reckless drivers are that close to a cyclist.
 

KimPete83

New Member
May 4, 2016
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This is such a scary video! As a road rider, I know how scary it can be out there. I am 100% for helmet cameras...this case proves a great point but I always thought of it more because my husband rides quite frequently by himself. If something were to ever happen, no one would know, except with the help of a helmet camera. I see now it serves as a safety guard on many levels. So glad you were not hurt!
 

Bentt

New Member
May 5, 2016
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Definitely a lucky situation! Helmet cams aren't only to record beautiful rides, in these situations they can also be convenient. But may I ask why you turned so early to the left? I personally keep to the right until I'm at a 90 degree angle with the street, just because there are asshats like that guy.
 

CAMPYBOB

Well-Known Member
Sep 12, 2005
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I ******** drivers when I take the lane.

Too.
Damned.
Bad.

What sort of past 'issues' did the 40-year old male driver have, if you could elaborate? And what was the outcome of the case to date?
 

Novelangel

Member
Apr 28, 2016
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This just goes to show you that cars pretty much "own" the road, or they think they do at least. A lot of people don't know bike arm signals, but this driver clearly didn't care one way or the other, because I really doubt that he/she couldn't see you there. A rider on a bike isn't exactly invisible. He/she didn't bother to slow down... that was a statement... I own the road, I'm in a car, therefore I can hurt you if I want to. This is one reason why I seldom ride roads that don't have special bike paths, it gets harder and harder to ride where people don't want you.
 

Weatherby

Well-Known Member
Mar 20, 2015
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Call me a coward but I'd never have taken the lane in that situation. The driver was wrong. Unless their wheels are stationary or I have clear eyeball to eyeball contact with a driver, I assume they are going to kill me.
 

dhk2

Active Member
Aug 8, 2006
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Call me a coward but I'd never have taken the lane in that situation. The driver was wrong. Unless their wheels are stationary or I have clear eyeball to eyeball contact with a driver, I assume they are going to kill me.

Yep, agree 100%. Here in AL, you can't trust drivers. It's rare to encounter a hostile driver, but most just don't look for bikes or know how to drive around them. In this left-turn situation, I check my mirror. If a car is within maybe 200m and approaching from behind at high speed, and I see I can't make the turn before he gets to it, I'll just slow down and move off the road to the right and let him pass.

I'll definitely "take the lane" in heavy city traffic when necessary, but out in the country, no. If it's easier for me to yield, that's what I'll do. Right of way means nothing when you're dead. And my manta is always be polite to the motorist when possible.
 
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Weatherby

Well-Known Member
Mar 20, 2015
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Yep, agree 100%. Here in AL, you can't trust drivers. It's rare to encounter a hostile driver, but most just don't look for bikes or know how to drive around them. In this left-turn situation, I check my mirror. If a car is within maybe 200m and approaching from behind at high speed, and I see I can't make the turn before he gets to it, I'll just slow down and move off the road to the right and let him pass.

I'll definitely "take the lane" in heavy city traffic when necessary, but out in the country, no. If it's easier for me to yield, that's what I'll do. Right of way means nothing when you're dead. And my manta is always be polite to the motorist when possible.

Exactly. In slow moving urban or suburban traffic (say 25 mph) on streets with lights and parked cars, I am out in traffic and take the lane and use hand commands.

Out in the country, I never know if someone driving is texting or just distracted. Cars can be moving at more than 100 feet per second and it can take 250 feet for a car to stop from 65-70 mph. Taking the lane when a motor vehicle is moving like that and is only several hundred feet back is taking the bet that the driver sees you.

I wish I was outraged by the video but this **** is not unexpected. I have so many close ones that I have seriously thought of giving it up. Drivers coming around corners on the wrong side of the road or suddenly swerving into my path on country roads is almost a DAILY occurrence. These random events are completely unpredictable Black Swans.

Cars and truck drivers are unpredictable. School bus and USPS drivers are the worst around here....they are death on wheels as far as I am concerned.

The safest drivers are illegal mexicans who work the local horse farms. They will almost invariably stop when coming the opposing direction on these little country roads that I ride. The old farmers are close in terms of respect, they always wave. Women in Mercedes or Lexus are the worst. They just speed right up the center of the road and F you shoving you into the gravel or ditch.
 

dhk2

Active Member
Aug 8, 2006
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Drivers out in the country here generally are friendly. There are exceptions of course, but close calls like you describe are rare for me. I'd say about 90% of the drivers give cyclists the full lane, ie, they pull over completely to the left of the center line to pass. We have a new 3ft passing law in AL, but really that's not good enough on high-speed highways because drivers still think they can squeeze past the cyclist even with oncoming traffic.

Note most of us here ride with bright flashing taillights (DiNotte is popular) that can be seen about 1/4 mile back on a bright sunny day. The idea is to give drivers early alert so they can plan how to pass. We generally ride in the middle of the lane, two abreast, to maximize visibility (drivers tend not to see things on the shoulder of the road as important). Then, we get into single file before the car passes, mostly just as a courtesy to let the driver know we see him.

Most of us old timers use helmet or eyeglass mirrors as well, so that we can see and react to approaching traffic. A couple of my riding buddies have the new Garmin rear-facing radar units. I think those would be good along with a mirror, but don't see them as a substitute.

I know opinions vary on these, not telling anyone where or how they should ride. Risk vs. reward, as well as personal safety decisions, are up to the individual.
 

maydog

Well-Known Member
Feb 5, 2010
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A google search of the driver's name revealed that back in 08 he threatened to strangle a county judge and blow up city hall on account of traffic fines and a suspended license. I did not bother to pay for a full background check.

I have not heard anymore regarding the case. Given the driver's history, I doubt that he would try to challenge the citation in court.
 

CAMPYBOB

Well-Known Member
Sep 12, 2005
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Given the driver's history, I doubt that he would try to challenge the citation in court.

Why bother...when he can just blow up the courthouse?

It sounds like you ran into (literally) one of society's mental defectives. I hope your paths never cross again. His type is best avoided. It's hard to believe he made it this far in life...a 40-year old adult driving like a 16-year old.