Hard Run vs. Easy Run

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Jbones, Sep 13, 2003.

  1. Jbones

    Jbones Guest

    Some days I can go out and approach my personal best time with absolute ease. Other days, I have to
    really grind and overcome both mental and physical obstacles to acheive the same time. My question
    is, does one workout produce more benefit than the other? I would think the harder runs do more for
    you because you have to surpass a psychological barrier. Any thoughts?

    -JB
     
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  2. Amh

    Amh Guest

    On Tue, 1 Apr 2003 20:22:42 -0500, "JBones" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Some days I can go out and approach my personal best time with absolute ease. Other days, I have to
    >really grind and overcome both mental and physical obstacles to acheive the same time. My question
    >is, does one workout produce more benefit than the other? I would think the harder runs do more for
    >you because you have to surpass a psychological barrier. Any thoughts?
    >
    >-JB

    Ahh those wonderful mental toughness days. Hard days are sometimes hard because you should be
    resting when you are running. Those runs are worse for you because your body is trying to repair
    itself and you are out breaking it down.

    But not every hard run is hard because you should be resting. On those days you should be taking it
    easy and not pushing. Listen to your body don't fight against it (unless you are racing). And if you
    feel like you are racing every day then you're doing more harm than good.

    Better to have a mental toughness day when the temperature is 38 degrees F and it is raining.

    my $0.02 Andy
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, JBones wrote:
    > Some days I can go out and approach my personal best time with absolute ease. Other days, I have
    > to really grind and overcome both mental and physical obstacles to acheive the same time. My
    > question is, does one workout produce more benefit than the other? I would think the harder runs
    > do more for you because you have to surpass a psychological barrier. Any thoughts?

    Avoid going all-out too frequently. Once a week is good enough. Most of your training should be at
    an easy pace, though you should also have 1 training session each week that is moderately hard, and
    one that is very hard.

    See the webpage here

    http://www.panix.com/~elflord/vdot.html

    you can use this to estimate training paces. If you don't know how far your usual run is, just
    guess it. The training pace based on the guess will work fine as long as you just use it on your
    usual course.

    The surest way to make sure that it's easy to run hard is to save your energy, and be ready for
    those days when you want to run a PR.

    On the other hand, there are some sources of discomfort that are unavoidable. Sometimes you will be
    tired. Sometimes it's cold, wet, and miserable, or it's extremely hot. Yes, I think these runs do
    have a certain character building value. I actually like running in cold weather and taking on the
    elements, especially in a race. It's uncomfortable, but it's possible to run pretty well in
    conditions that really aren't very comfortable.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  4. Roger Hunter

    Roger Hunter Guest

    "JBones" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > My question is, does one workout produce more benefit than the other? I would think the harder
    runs
    > do more for you because you have to surpass a psychological barrier. Any thoughts?

    My answer, JB, is that you think too much about trivia.

    Roger.
     
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