Hard to fit tyres

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Daveh, Mar 25, 2003.

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  1. Daveh

    Daveh Guest

    Hi!

    Could someone tell me why some tyres are so hard to fit? My latest frustration was with a Hutchinson
    - can't remember the model. I was about 20km from home when I had a puncture. You can't use the
    plastic tyre levers, so I had to use a metal one, and every time I use them unless I am particularly
    careful - and lucky - I puncture the tube when putting the tyre back on. Sure enough I did... I
    eventually rode back with no tube - I didn't care if I ruined the tyre as it went straight into the
    rubbish anyway!

    Is there any reason for the tyres to be so tight? Is there any special technique to use when putting
    them on the rim? Are there certain tyres to be avoided?

    Looking foward to your comments.

    Dave
     
    Tags:


  2. Rg

    Rg Guest

    "DaveH" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi!
    >
    > Could someone tell me why some tyres are so hard to fit? My latest frustration was with a
    > Hutchinson - can't remember the model. I was about 20km from home when I had a puncture. You can't
    > use the plastic tyre levers, so I had to use a metal one, and every time I use them unless I am
    > particularly careful - and lucky - I puncture the tube when putting the tyre back on. Sure enough
    > I did... I eventually rode back with no tube - I didn't care if I ruined the tyre as it went
    > straight into the rubbish anyway!
    >
    > Is there any reason for the tyres to be so tight? Is there any special technique to use when
    > putting them on the rim? Are there certain tyres to be avoided?
    >
    > Looking foward to your comments.
    >
    > Dave

    ... I'm sure you know this BUT just in case - when you have replaced the tube inside the tyre casing
    just give it a few pumps of air to expand it so that you reduce the risk of pinching it with the
    tyre levers.

    You may need to deflate the tube to seat the casing in the rim before pumping it up again and going
    on your merry way.

    RG
     
  3. Bruce

    Bruce Guest

    DaveH wrote:
    > Hi!
    >
    > Could someone tell me why some tyres are so hard to fit?

    The rims on my MTB make it hard to fit ANY tyre. the solution i found was .. i forget the name. It
    is made in South Africa, a single telescopic lever that you
    - hook under the tyre
    - extend tool and hook other end on axel (QR)
    - hold lever near tyre, and pull in 360 degree arc around rim

    It will also put tyres back on, using the other side of tool.

    Anybody know the name? Its great.
     
  4. Andresmuro

    Andresmuro Guest

    Here is the trick to get tires on. When you mount the tire, massage the beads into the center of the
    rim, which is deeper. Go around the whole tire massaging it in its entirety towards the center. This
    should create some slack, even if a tiny amount. This should give you enough play to massage the
    last section into the rim even with the most stubborn tires. Using this technique, I can mount
    almost any tire into a rim w/o using levers, which can pinch tubes. Somwething else that you can try
    is to stand on the tire casing and with your hands, pull as hard as you can. This may stretch the
    tire if only a tad.

    Andres
     
  5. Tauras

    Tauras Guest

    keep a small bar of hotel soap in your kit, bit of soap and a drop of water and those hard to fits
    will just slide on. Works welll on mtn bike tires, have fun!

    Tauras http://www.slonet.org/~tsulaiti/surfreport/

    "DaveH" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi!
    >
    > Could someone tell me why some tyres are so hard to fit? My latest frustration was with a
    > Hutchinson - can't remember the model. I was about 20km from home when I had a puncture. You can't
    > use the plastic tyre levers, so I had to use a metal one, and every time I use them unless I am
    > particularly careful - and lucky - I puncture the tube when putting the tyre back on. Sure enough
    > I did... I eventually rode back with no tube - I didn't care if I ruined the tyre as it went
    > straight into the rubbish anyway!
    >
    > Is there any reason for the tyres to be so tight? Is there any special technique to use when
    > putting them on the rim? Are there certain tyres to be avoided?
    >
    > Looking foward to your comments.
    >
    > Dave

    -----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =----- http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1
    Newsgroup Service in the World! -----== Over 80,000 Newsgroups - 16 Different Servers! =-----
     
  6. Quantjock

    Quantjock Guest

    I've found that it isn't the tire that is mis-sized -- but the wheel. I've got 3 sets of 700cc
    wheels and only my cheapest set is impossible to get tires on. I don't know if the spokes aren't
    pulled tight enough, or if the rim is miscast -- all I know is: it's not the tire -- it's the wheel.

    "DaveH" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi!
    >
    > Could someone tell me why some tyres are so hard to fit? My latest frustration was with a
    > Hutchinson - can't remember the model. I was about 20km from home when I had a puncture. You can't
    > use the plastic tyre levers, so I had to use a metal one, and every time I use them unless I am
    > particularly careful - and lucky - I puncture the tube when putting the tyre back on. Sure enough
    > I did... I eventually rode back with no tube - I didn't care if I ruined the tyre as it went
    > straight into the rubbish anyway!
    >
    > Is there any reason for the tyres to be so tight? Is there any special technique to use when
    > putting them on the rim? Are there certain tyres to be avoided?
    >
    > Looking foward to your comments.
    >
    > Dave
     
  7. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "DaveH" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi!
    >
    > Could someone tell me why some tyres are so hard to fit? My latest frustration was with a
    > Hutchinson - can't remember the model. I was about 20km from home when I had a puncture. You can't
    > use the plastic tyre levers, so I had to use a metal one, and every time I use them unless I am
    > particularly careful - and lucky - I puncture the tube when putting the tyre back on. Sure enough
    > I did... I eventually rode back with no tube - I didn't care if I ruined the tyre as it went
    > straight into the rubbish anyway!
    >
    > Is there any reason for the tyres to be so tight? Is there any special technique to use when
    > putting them on the rim? Are there certain tyres to be avoided?
    >
    > Looking foward to your comments.
    >
    > Dave

    Some times it is even a too thick rim strip causing the problems. I had a friend that was blowing
    tires off his CXP33s till he went to a thinner rim strip. After that, the problems stopped. The
    combination of a slightly oversized rim, a slightly undersized tire, and a thick rim strip all
    conspire to frustrate us.

    Try going to something like a Ritchey strip, or something similar. Your LBS should be able to set
    you up with something. If not, then a strip or two of packing tape may work.

    Mike
     
  8. Andres is right. I always do that and can get anything on without levers, with patience. Another
    point. Any bit of air in tube can cause a problem.
     
  9. Kool Stop makes a great tool that really helps get a tight fitting tire onto the rim. You can see it
    by going to: (http://www.koolstop.com/brakes/accessories.html) and then clicking on TIRE BEAD JACK.

    I bought one from my LBS (about $10) and it has never failed me.

    Bob Taylor
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >DaveH wrote:
    >> Hi!
    >>
    >> Could someone tell me why some tyres are so hard to fit?
    >The rims on my MTB make it hard to fit ANY tyre. the solution i found was .. i forget the name. It
    >is made in South Africa, a single telescopic lever that you
    >- hook under the tyre
    >- extend tool and hook other end on axel (QR)
    >- hold lever near tyre, and pull in 360 degree arc around rim It will also put tyres back on, using
    > the other side of tool. Anybody know the name? Its great.

    I think this is the crank brother, or is it cook?, device. I have one and I was not impressed with
    it. It works fine with tires that go one easily. With the really stubborn tires, it sucks. I have
    had better luck use the VAR tire levers. It is a wishbone shaped device that hooks onto one side of
    the rim and the other goes under the tire bead. You can then leverage the tire into place.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    >
    >I've found that it isn't the tire that is mis-sized -- but the wheel. I've got 3 sets of 700cc
    >wheels and only my cheapest set is impossible to get tires on. I don't know if the spokes
    >aren't pulled tight enough, or if the rim is miscast -- all I know is: it's not the tire --
    >it's the wheel.

    This will vary. I've had experiences with wheels where one brand of tire slipped right on, but a
    different brand was very stubborn.
    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  12. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Alex Rodriguez" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > >
    > >
    > >DaveH wrote:
    > >> Hi!
    > >>
    > >> Could someone tell me why some tyres are so hard to fit?
    > >The rims on my MTB make it hard to fit ANY tyre. the solution i found was .. i forget the name.
    > >It is made in South Africa, a single telescopic lever that you
    > >- hook under the tyre
    > >- extend tool and hook other end on axel (QR)
    > >- hold lever near tyre, and pull in 360 degree arc around rim It will also put tyres back on,
    > > using the other side of tool. Anybody know the name? Its great.
    >
    > I think this is the crank brother, or is it cook?, device. I have one and I was not impressed with
    > it. It works fine with tires that go one easily. With the really stubborn tires, it sucks. I have
    > had better luck use the VAR tire levers. It is a wishbone shaped device that hooks onto one side
    > of the rim and the other goes under the tire bead. You can then leverage the tire into place.
    > -----------------

    I've got one of those. They work wonders if nothing else will work. Thankfully, I haven't had to use
    it too many times.

    Mike

    > Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
  13. Iguana Bwana

    Iguana Bwana Guest

    On 25 Mar 2003 02:09:18 -0800, [email protected] (DaveH) wrote:

    >Could someone tell me why some tyres are so hard to fit?

    Tyres like rims, differ in their actual vs stated sizing. The combination of a slightly undersize
    tyre with a slightly oversize rim makes for tight fitting, particularly so of those with an
    inflexible wire bead. IME judicious use of Michelin plastic tyre levers which won't damage the rim
    are the answer to those which stubbornly resist hand fitment.

    As for which particular tyres. Personal experience or word of mouth generally determines my list,
    which IME is a function of ea individual tyre model rather than a particular brand per se. But model
    changes are so dynamic now, it's semi-impossible to keep a meaningfully accurate list for any period
    of time. By the time you need a new set of tyres or get through trying something else, the model has
    frequently been superseded.

    Iguana Bwana
     
  14. Jon Isaacs

    Jon Isaacs Guest

    >Here is the trick to get tires on. When you mount the tire, massage the beads into the center of
    >the rim, which is deeper. Go around the whole tire massaging it in its entirety towards the center.
    >This should create some slack, even if a tiny amount. This should give you enough play to massage
    >the last section into the rim even with the most stubborn tires. Using this technique, I can mount
    >almost any tire into a rim w/o using levers, which can pinch tubes. Somwething else that you can
    >try is to stand on the tire casing and with your hands, pull as hard as you can. This may stretch
    >the tire if only a tad.
    >
    >Andres

    Since someone showed me this trick 10 years ago, I have not had to use tire levers once. I
    have mounted some tires others found impossible, it really does work. Strong wrists are a big
    help as well.

    Jon
     
  15. Tbgibb

    Tbgibb Guest

    To Andres' excellent advice I'll add that it makes it just a little easier to pushl on the tire with
    your hands rather than try to push on the bead with your sore thumbs.

    Tom Gibb <[email protected]
     
  16. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "DaveH" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi!
    >
    > Could someone tell me why some tyres are so hard to fit? My latest frustration was with a
    > Hutchinson - can't remember the model. I was about 20km from home when I had a puncture. You can't
    > use the plastic tyre levers, so I had to use a metal one, and every time I use them unless I am
    > particularly careful - and lucky - I puncture the tube when putting the tyre back on. Sure enough
    > I did... I eventually rode back with no tube - I didn't care if I ruined the tyre as it went
    > straight into the rubbish anyway!
    >
    > Is there any reason for the tyres to be so tight? Is there any special technique to use when
    > putting them on the rim? Are there certain tyres to be avoided?

    Many tight tire situtaions involve the rim liner. Some rims have spoke holes that are so large and
    close to the bead seat that no liner could possibly both cover the hole and avoid the bead seat.
    When a liner occludes the tire's seat on the rim, it is difficult to mount (and sometimes impossible
    to properly seat) a tire. Check that. Cyclists sometimes hypercorrect and use two rim liners. That
    makes mounting/removal daunting. The easiest rims to mount tires on have a big difference in
    diameter between the channel in the center of the rim and the bead seat. When you mount a tire, the
    bead can drop down to that smaller center diameter on one side while you easily lift the tire over
    the top of the rim on the other side. (That concept was Michelin's gift to the world). So anything
    that gives you more room in the center will help. The Ritchey rim liner ( looks like ripstop nylon -
    maybe it is) is the thinnest I know of and does help a lot of your rim doesn't have much
    differential from the center well to the bead seat. Tires do vary by brand so you might try other
    brands of tire to see which fits more easily. I don't think it is unreasonable to ask to your LBS to
    let you try a few tires on your rim. It doesn't take long ( you don't need a tube for this) to test
    fit a tire. What rim are you using? What rim liner? Lastly, I think you are right to be concerned
    and if I were you I would sort this out and get a more reasonable combination before finding myself
    stranded somplace with a recalcitrant tire. If the dealer supplied this rim/tire combination I would
    expect an exchange gratis.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  17. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On Tue, 25 Mar 2003 21:31:46 -0600, "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >That concept was Michelin's gift to the world). So anything that gives you more room in the
    >center will help. The Ritchey rim liner ( looks like ripstop nylon - maybe it is) is the thinnest
    >I know of and does help a lot of your rim doesn't have much differential from the center well to
    >the bead seat.

    I worry about the plastic or nylon rim tapes. On a tandem, a failure mode for the overheated rim is
    for the rim tape to melt and implode the tube. I don't know specifically about Ritchey but some of
    them are non-reinforced plastic. Two wraps of strapping tape is very thin but is a pain if you need
    to remove.
     
  18. Gearóid Ó Laoi, Garry Lee <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Another point. Any bit of air in tube can cause a problem.

    I always start with air in to keep the tube out of the rim bed where it can become pinched, and
    deflate it as I finish the job.
    --
    David Damerell <[email protected]> flcl?
     
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