Harrassment?

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Colin Blackburn

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I did my usual ten-minute ride from work to Durham station at 4:30 last night. There are usually
plenty of dickheads and close overtaking at that time but last night was a bit different. I get to
the main lights I have to go through and pass the cars (safely) up to the stop line, and stop. It's
an odd crossroads in that the main flow is around one of the 90 degree turns, thus when the lights
change there are no oncoming or turning cars on the junction.

So, lights change and I put my foot down to pull off away from the car at the front of the queue.
The junction itself has some broken tarmac so I tend to keep a wide (to the right) line across to
avoid the pot holes and then once I'm across I usually stay in the primary position. The road at
this point has standing traffic queueing in the oncoming lane and it is narrow with bends, grates
and junctions on both sides, I go down this road as fast as the cars if I am behind one so my
position isn't normally isn't a problem.

Last night though the car behind started sounding his horn at me. I had no intention of pulling left
until further down the road where it might be safe for it to overtake so I just kept going as
normal. As I passed the zebra crossing I pulled in a bit, he then overtook me on the crossing.

I was annoyed but thought that was the last of it as I took a left and he carried straight on.
However, as I get around to the station approach I see the car again---he's going to the station
but he took a different route. I need to turn left into the approach, he needs to turn right. He
flashes several times at me and then turns in front of me but immediately stops at an angle to
prevent me passing.

At this stage I assume a 6'5" skinhead with a baseball bat is going to get out and I quickly review
my options. I end up stopping because I had no choice, I glanced at the driver to see whether to
turn around and exercise my yellow streak. I see a 60 year old man shouting at me across his
passenger. I decide that I might as well ask him what the problem is.

He claimed I was "all over the place". I wasn't but still not a reason to pip. I explained that I
was cycling in the primary position as it was not safe for him to pass. He pointed out that as a
cyclist I was "not allowed to lead the traffic." I must admit to being a bit baffled at this and
suggested that the police might like to interpret his actions. I referred him to Cyclecraft and
mentioned the HC. He then told me that he was an ex-police officer and knew the rules of the road. I
suggested he didn't. I might have used a few expletives along the way. Anyway, he gave up arguing
and drove off towards the station.

If he was a copper then I sincerely hope he wasn't a traffic cop.

I'm still wondering if it is worth reporting, not for the original use of the horn but for the
subsequent harrassment.

Colin
 
W

W K

Guest
"Colin Blackburn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...

> no choice, I glanced at the driver to see whether to turn around and exercise my yellow streak.

Yes, you should have ****** through his window.

> If he was a copper then I sincerely hope he wasn't a traffic cop.
>
> I'm still wondering if it is worth reporting, not for the original use of the horn but for the
> subsequent harrassment.

Do you know the handshake?
 
J

John B

Guest
Colin Blackburn wrote:

> He claimed I was "all over the place". I wasn't but still not a reason to pip. I explained that
> I was cycling in the primary position as it was not safe for him to pass. He pointed out that
> as a cyclist I was "not allowed to lead the traffic." I must admit to being a bit baffled at
> this and suggested that the police might like to interpret his actions. I referred him to
> Cyclecraft and mentioned the HC. He then told me that he was an ex-police officer and knew the
> rules of the road...

<snip>

> If he was a copper then I sincerely hope he wasn't a traffic cop.
>
> I'm still wondering if it is worth reporting, not for the original use of the horn but for the
> subsequent harrassment.

I certainly would as it was tantamount to impersonating a police officer.

I'm sure the police would not take lightly to such a d*cKhead using their name as a means to
intimidate and harrass you, whether he was an ex or not.

John B
 
A

Andy Dingley

Guest
On Fri, 06 Jun 2003 09:40:05 +0100, Colin Blackburn <[email protected]> wrote:

>I see a 60 year old man shouting at me across his passenger.

Wearing a hat ? Driving a Rover ? Barely able to see over the wheel ?

Cagers just get senile eventually (not always so young). There's little you can do about them - but
Viz' "Major Misunderstanding" strip might cheer you up a little.

I live near a hump-backed bridge which is narrow, has a bend in the middle, and is protected by
traffic lights. I _always_ use the whole lane across the narrow bit, because the idiot who tries to
overtake there is still far too common.
 
A

Adrian Boliston

Guest
"Colin Blackburn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...

> ..... He pointed out that as a cyclist I was "not allowed to lead the traffic." I must admit to
> being a bit baffled at this.....

It would surely mean that you would be required to stop if traffic was anywhere behind you. This
could however be quite hazardous if the car behind had poor brakes!
 
J

Just Zis Guy

Guest
"Colin Blackburn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...

> He claimed I was [...] "not allowed to lead the traffic."

This is, of course, Complete Bollocks(TM). The bloke was clearly a stranger to the rules of the road
(so no surprises there). It is just possible he was a retired copper, but more likely that was also
Complete Bollocks.

I have been told in the past with great authority that I must stop pedalling while being overtaken.
Also Complete Bollocks. And that I must stop and let following vehicles pass, which is so far
distorted from the real situation as to be Complete Bollocks too.

I just wish these cagers would devote as much brain space to remembering the Highway Code as they do
to their treasured collection of Complete Bollocks[1]. Maybe then they would realise that they have
one or two responsibilities themselves.

[1] Of the kind mentioned herein, not the kind to be forcibly removed following transgressions.

--
Guy
===
I wonder if you wouldn't mind piecing out our imperfections with your thoughts; and while you're
about it perhaps you could think when we talk of bicycles, that you see them printing their proud
wheels i' the receiving earth; thanks awfully.
 
A

Al_mossah

Guest
Absolutely right. It is well known that a cyclist is "not allowed to lead the traffic". I witnessed
a disgraceful scene outside my work recently. Half the road was dug up for a distance of a couple of
hundred metres. The remaining half (a single lane) was controlled by temporary lights. A cyclist had
the temerity to "lead the traffic" through the roadworks. There was no room for the poor drivers to
overtake the non-road-tax-paying-free-riding-leech, so the first one in the queue following the
aformentioned NRTPFRL sounded his horn for the entire length of the roadworks, thus complying with
the Highway Code section which allows motorists not to pay any attention to the Code. Distressingly,
the NRTPFRL seemed not to be trying to go very fast, despite the perfectly reasonable honking from
behind him. In fact I would swear that there was a negative correlation between the honking and the
resulting speed of cycling. A strange phenomenom, which I invite anyone to explain. :)

Peter.
 
P

Peter B

Guest
"al_Mossah" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Absolutely right. It is well known that a cyclist is "not allowed to lead the traffic". I
> witnessed a disgraceful scene outside my work recently. Half the road was dug up for a distance of
> a couple of hundred metres.
The
> remaining half (a single lane) was controlled by temporary lights. A cyclist had the temerity to
> "lead the traffic" through the roadworks.
There
> was no room for the poor drivers to overtake the non-road-tax-paying-free-riding-leech, so the
> first one in the queue following the aformentioned NRTPFRL sounded his horn for the entire length
> of the roadworks, thus complying with the Highway Code section which
allows
> motorists not to pay any attention to the Code. Distressingly, the NRTPFRL seemed not to be trying
> to go very fast, despite the perfectly reasonable honking from behind him. In fact I would swear
> that there was
a
> negative correlation between the honking and the resulting speed of
cycling.
> A strange phenomenom, which I invite anyone to explain. :)

My car does the same when tailgated, the closer the tailgater the slower my car goes. I think it's a
safety feature that automatically kicks in to slow my car when it senses the close proximity of
another vehicle as it assumes a collision is possible so an adjustment is made to lessen the impact
speed. I assume the technology has been stolen and applied to the bicycle in question in the
tradition of NRTPFRLism.

Pete, (who thinks some white vans should come with short drawbars so they can hitch onto my tow-bar,
especially the Sun reading masturbator in Kirby-In-Ashfield on Monday rant, rant)
 
J

Just Zis Guy

Guest
"Peter B" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

> My car does the same when tailgated, the closer the tailgater the slower
my
> car goes.

That's not just an enjoyable way of tweaking their noses, it's Paul Ripley's advice for dealing with
people following too close. Essentially, if they are following too close for the speed you're doing,
slow down until the speed matches the distance they've left.

The approved uk.tosspot solution, of course, is for you to overtake the next car, leaving them with
the problem instead.

--
Guy
===
I wonder if you wouldn't mind piecing out our imperfections with your thoughts; and while you're
about it perhaps you could think when we talk of bicycles, that you see them printing their proud
wheels i' the receiving earth; thanks awfully.
 
D

David Hansen

Guest
On Fri, 6 Jun 2003 13:04:36 +0100 someone who may be "Just zis Guy, you know?"
<[email protected]> wrote this:-

>I have been told in the past with great authority that I must stop pedalling while being overtaken.

Not with great authority. With great conviction on the part of the person who was talking
bollocks no doubt.

--
David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number F566DA0E I will always explain revoked
keys, unless the UK government prevents me using the RIP Act 2000.
 
M

Mads Hilberg

Guest
> The approved uk.tosspot solution, of course, is for you to overtake the
next
> car, leaving them with the problem instead.

Alternatively slow down very suddenly by using your handbrake (carefully!). This will scare them
sh*tless and usually makes them back off.

Mads
 
P

Peter B

Guest
"Mads Hilberg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> > The approved uk.tosspot solution, of course, is for you to overtake the
> next
> > car, leaving them with the problem instead.
>
> Alternatively slow down very suddenly by using your handbrake
(carefully!).
> This will scare them sh*tless and usually makes them back off.

The sort of thing I may have done some years ago but I really don't want the hassle of playing silly
buggars these days.

Also some years ago the his actions may have produced a reaction in me that would demonstrate that I
don't take kindly to being intimidated. But it was a lovely sunny day, I'd got a cushy job lined up
with the promise of finishing early enough to carry on to Sherwood Pines and ride my mtb. This
panned out but Mr. W. V. Mann probably finished his day with his heart struggling to pump high
pressure cholesterol around furred up arteries whilst gagging on a ***. (maybe not, but he certainly
ended his day as he began it, as a complete ******) No, I think I've got it sorted ;-)

Pete
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
Mads Hilberg wrote:

>> The approved uk.tosspot solution, of course, is for you to overtake the next car, leaving them
>> with the problem instead.

> Alternatively slow down very suddenly by using your handbrake (carefully!). This will scare them
> sh*tless and usually makes them back off.

Or switch on your rear fog lights. The Mgt. wishes to advise The Public that it does not condone
this, no Sir, not at all...

Dave Larrington - http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/
===========================================================
Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
===========================================================
 
D

Daniel Barlow

Guest
"Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> writes:

> That's not just an enjoyable way of tweaking their noses, it's Paul Ripley's advice for dealing
> with people following too close. Essentially, if they are following too close for the speed you're
> doing, slow down until the speed matches the distance they've left.

Also (in traffic, at least) if you are going to get rear-ended, you want to leave a decent-sized gap
to the vehicle in front so you don't end up being shunted into it.

-dan

--

http://www.cliki.net/ - Link farm for free CL-on-Unix resources
 
S

Sandy Morton

Guest
In article <[email protected]>, Mads Hilberg
<[email protected]> wrote:
> Alternatively slow down very suddenly by using your handbrake (carefully!). This will scare them
> sh*tless and usually makes them back off.

In the days of my long gone youth I had switches which could turn on the brake lights when they
shouldn't have been on and turn them off when they should have been on. I didn't have too many
tailgaters but not too many people could cope with a blown 1600 engine in a 307E van either. Ah
nostalgia!

--
T h e - e x t e n d e r ! ! ! !
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
"Mads Hilberg" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> Alternatively slow down very suddenly by using your handbrake
(carefully!).
> This will scare them sh*tless and usually makes them back off.
>

And if you have not used the handbrake on a moving car before will probably scare you shitless as
well however careful you think you are being. If you want to do this practice on an empty parking
lot because the handbrake is a very good way to send the car backwards into the roadside if you do
not know what you are doing.

Tony

--
http://www.raven-family.com

"All truth goes through three steps: First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed.
Finally, it is accepted as self-evident." Arthur Schopenhauer
 
D

Dave Kahn

Guest
On Fri, 6 Jun 2003 13:04:36 +0100, "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote:

>I have been told in the past with great authority that I must stop pedalling while being overtaken.

Interesting problem for you if you were riding a fixed wheel. :)

--
Dave...
 
J

Jim Price

Guest
Dave Kahn wrote:
> On Fri, 6 Jun 2003 13:04:36 +0100, "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>>I have been told in the past with great authority that I must stop pedalling while being
>>overtaken.
>
>
> Interesting problem for you if you were riding a fixed wheel. :)

LOL

A case of being undertaken because you were overtaken? Or an excuse for kicking the side of the
overtaking car when attempting to keep your feet clear of the pedals?

Jim Price
 
P

Peter B

Guest
"Dave Kahn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> On Fri, 6 Jun 2003 13:04:36 +0100, "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >I have been told in the past with great authority that I must stop
pedalling
> >while being overtaken.
>
> Interesting problem for you if you were riding a fixed wheel. :)

Even with a freewheel you'd eventually grind to a halt on a busy road, especially uphill.

Pete
 
B

Ben

Guest
On Fri, 6 Jun 2003 16:06:30 +0100, "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote:

>"Peter B" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
>
>> My car does the same when tailgated, the closer the tailgater the slower
>my
>> car goes.
>
>That's not just an enjoyable way of tweaking their noses, it's Paul Ripley's advice for dealing
>with people following too close. Essentially, if they are following too close for the speed you're
>doing, slow down until the speed matches the distance they've left.

Aye I witness a perfect display of this on the M42 on Thursday night with a 4x4 being tailgated by a
Merc on trade plates who obviously thought the trade plates made him immune to the speed camera van.

>The approved uk.tosspot solution, of course, is for you to overtake the next car, leaving them with
>the problem instead.

Or the uk.rec.motorcycles method: wind it up to 180 and let them try and tailgate you :)
--
"We take these risks, not to escape from life, but to prevent life escaping from us." ***** replace
'spam' with 'ben' to reply *****
 
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