Have a Daily Dose of Omega-3



R

Roman Bystrianyk

Guest
"Have a Daily Dose of Omega-3", US News and World Report, December 17,
2005,
Link:
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/health/articles/051226/26body.omega.htm

What do my dog, horse, and husband all have in common--besides me? All
three will toast the New Year with a sprinkle of omega-3 in their
breakfast bowls. Maybe you will, too.

The animals are sublimely unaware that they consume it (in the form of
flaxseed) or why (because of evidence it may ease arthritic aches and
pains and put a shine on their coats). But my husband is on to the
health benefits. He has a daily, 2-tablespoon, 3,500-mg dose of ground
flaxseed on his granola. He says it has a "nutty" taste.

Cardiologists praise omega-3 fatty acids. Found in fatty fish like
salmon and mackerel as well as in flaxseed, canola oil, and walnuts,
they protect the heart against inflammation that can result in blocked
arteries and can prevent irregular heartbeats that can lead to a sudden
heart attack. And there's growing evidence that these polyunsaturated
fats avert strokes, reduce inflammation and joint pain from arthritis,
and promote brain and vision development in infants. Statistics even
link omega-3s to broader health benefits--for example, they may ward
off complications from diabetes. They're being used to treat depression
and Alzheimer's disease. Better skin, stronger fingernails, and more
energy are also possible perks.

Unfortunately, there are data to suggest that farmed salmon, the fish
most of us trust as a great source of omega-3s, can pose a health risk.
Farmed salmon are raised on fish oil pellets derived from local fish,
which are often contaminated with cancer-causing PCB s. The most recent
study, in the November issue of the Journal of Nutrition, reports that
contaminant levels in farmed salmon from certain regions increase the
risk of cancer enough to outweigh benefits.

The study concluded that as a whole, risks exceed benefits for farmed
Atlantic salmon. Farmed salmon from South America, specifically Chile,
had the lowest level of pollutants, followed by North America. Europe
had the highest level, according to David Carpenter, coauthor of the
study and director of the Institute for Health and the Environment at
the University at Albany's School of Public Health. Pacific wild salmon
also have contaminants, but at a low enough level that the benefits
outweigh the risks.

If you're unsure where the salmon is farmed, or still wary, consider
canned salmon, which usually uses wild fish. You can also find omega-3
fatty acids to a lesser degree in leafy green vegetables like broccoli,
brussels sprouts, and spinach, as well as in tofu. And new sources are
popping up on grocery shelves. These include free-range, grass-fed
beef, which has omega-3 levels higher than those in grain-fed animals,
and enhanced eggs, baby food, and cereal.

There are also omega-3 supplements from fish oil or flax. But high
intakes of supplements could cause bleeding in some people, according
to the American Heart Association. And more studies are needed to
confirm the benefits of supplements. "Increasing omega-3 fatty acid
intake through foods is preferable," says Alice Lichtenstein, professor
of nutrition at Tufts University.

Acid dose. How much omega-3 is enough? The ideal amount isn't clear.
The American Heart Association recommends two servings of fish a week,
about 8 ounces total, along with other omega-3-rich foods in your diet.
A quarter cup of walnuts, for example, supplies about 2.3 grams of
plant-based omega-3 fatty acids, slightly more than found in 4 ounces
of salmon. Even better, those two tablespoons of flaxseed supply 3.5
grams.

So when it comes to a healthy new year, you might just want to eat like
my horse. -Kerry Hannon
 
M

montygram

Guest
"All three will toast the New Year with a sprinkle of omega-3 in their
breakfast bowls."

So it's going to be an oxidative stress holiday season for your family.

Good luck with it.
 
C

cguttman

Guest
Is this true - salmon that is canned is usually wild? Why is it unusual
that packaged or fresh salmon is wild?

Chris


> If you're unsure where the salmon is farmed, or still wary, consider
> canned salmon, which usually uses wild fish. You can also find omega-3
> fatty acids to a lesser degree in leafy green vegetables like broccoli,
> brussels sprouts, and spinach, as well as in tofu. And new sources are
> popping up on grocery shelves. These include free-range, grass-fed
> beef, which has omega-3 levels higher than those in grain-fed animals,
> and enhanced eggs, baby food, and cereal.
>
 
M

Mel Smith

Guest
Chris said:

"cguttman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Is this true - salmon that is canned is usually wild? Why is it unusual
> that packaged or fresh salmon is wild?



Chris,

According to Dr. Andrew Weil (Nutrition Specialist at the University of
Arizona in Tucson), the most easily obtainable and best *canned* salmon (for
Omega-3 oils) is Pink/Red Sockeye. It is 'wild' because fish farmers have
not yet found a way to 'tame it'

Also, the sockeye is less carnavorous that other fish, and so has less
build up of toxic chemicals from eating other fish.

(This info was gleaned from a recent Time Magazine article in which Dr.
Weil wrote an article).


So my wife is going to get some canned sockeye tomorrow :)))

-Mel Smith
 
M

Mr-Natural-Health

Guest
Roman Bystrianyk wrote:

> "Have a Daily Dose of Omega-3", US News and World Report, December 17,
> 2005,
> Link:
> http://www.usnews.com/usnews/health/articles/051226/26body.omega.htm


> You can also find omega-3
> fatty acids to a lesser degree in leafy green vegetables like broccoli,
> brussels sprouts, and spinach, as well as in tofu. And new sources are
> popping up on grocery shelves. These include free-range, grass-fed
> beef, which has omega-3 levels higher than those in grain-fed animals,
> and enhanced eggs, baby food, and cereal.
>
> There are also omega-3 supplements from fish oil or flax.


What I just love/hate about these types of articles is that they are
just basically one person babbling away on various topics like Omega-3
EFAs. They publish them on the web purely to attract people to their
web site, using the same principle that attracts ants to honey. They
never say virtually anything intelligent about the subject. These
articles, just like news stories in the media, only babble about
unconnected bits of information. In a way, they also represent the
typical newsgroup post.

What is even more to love/hate about them is that what follows in ngs
are the replies by food faddists
http://food.naturalhealthperspective.com/faddism.html
and an assorted collection of idiots clamoring for more information.

As for me, I just like to comment on the human condition. I happen to
have another interesting THREAD going in the exercise ngs. So, I have
no devotion to the science or nutrition ngs.

If you want good information. Search for it on web sites rather than in
ngs. Web pages are developed. Ngs only have a bunch of idiots
cackling at each other. Fools like Montygram are good for a few
laughs, but that is about it.
--
john gohde
http://naturalhealthperspective.com/
My home page now contains the most up to date listing of 120+ web pages
on my health accredited web site. Currently, I am working on good
stuff from Joseph Pilates and the Mind-Body Connection. I got
information on Pilates that you wont find any place else on the web.