Have you even noticed how random stuff gets imbedded in the asphalt?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Robert Canon, Dec 18, 2003.

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  1. Robert Canon

    Robert Canon Guest

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  2. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Robert Canon" <[email protected]> writes:
    > OK, so it's not "my penis is a bicycle"...
    >
    > But I've got -pictures-!
    >
    > http://128.83.80.200/bike/sip.html

    Heh :) Talk about violating the roads!

    Maybe millenia from now, archaeologists will dig up this embedded stuff, and base all kinds of
    speculations and conjectures about our culture on it.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  3. Chris Neary

    Chris Neary Guest

    My guess is the bracket is a clamp off an exhaust system.

    Chris Neary [email protected]

    "Science, freedom, beauty, adventure: what more could you ask of life? Bicycling combined all the
    elements I loved" - Adapted from a quotation by Charles Lindbergh
     
  4. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Guest

    On Thu, 18 Dec 2003 16:25:47 -0600, "Robert Canon"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >OK, so it's not "my penis is a bicycle"...
    >
    >But I've got -pictures-!
    >
    >http://128.83.80.200/bike/sip.html
    >

    I enjoyed the pics- I hope that you keep finding more.

    Question- lots of blue faces on all the metal pieces. Is this lighting, something in the
    environment, or a little photoshop highlighting?
     
  5. Sorni

    Sorni Guest

    Robert Canon wrote:
    > OK, so it's not "my penis is a bicycle"...
    >
    > But I've got -pictures-!
    >
    > http://128.83.80.200/bike/sip.html

    Are those "regular" roads? Sure look bumpy compared to what I picture as asphalt...

    Bill "disillusioned" S.
     
  6. R15757

    R15757 Guest

    Robert Canon has a good eye for stuff stuck in the top layer of flexible pavement structures.

    The Caddy symbol looks like the head of a cartoon kid with a crewcut, ears sticking out, and he's
    yelling for help because he's like stuck in the street.

    The letter looks like a 'b' from a Chevy Celebrity.

    Thanks for that.

    Robert
     
  7. Robert Canon

    Robert Canon Guest

    > I enjoyed the pics- I hope that you keep finding more.

    Thanks Dan. I already have my eye on what looks like part of the handle of a utility knife near the
    exhaust clamp (good call, Chris), but it's in the turn lane of a busy intersection and might take a
    little doing to get a good photo.

    > Question- lots of blue faces on all the metal pieces. Is this lighting, something in the
    > environment, or a little photoshop highlighting?

    The pictures are completely unretouched/edited, except for the resized ones that link to the full
    size original images. They were taken during my commute in the early morning light, as evidenced by
    the long shadows thrown by the little pebbles, on an utterly clear day. I think the blue must be the
    reflected sky since the pictures were taken from almost directly above.
     
  8. Robert Canon

    Robert Canon Guest

    > Are those "regular" roads? Sure look bumpy compared to what I picture as asphalt...
    >
    > Bill "disillusioned" S.

    They're regular for central Texas. I think they call it chip-seal; they start with an asphalt base,
    oil it, then spread finely chipped rock on it and basically let the traffic work it into the asphalt
    base. It set's up a bit of a buzz with a small high pressure tire but with a 1.25" tire at 90psi
    it's pretty smooth sailing. I suppose the same consistency that lets the gravel embed allows the
    random junk to do the same.
     
  9. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Robert Canon" <[email protected]> writes:
    >> Are those "regular" roads? Sure look bumpy compared to what I picture as asphalt...
    >>
    >> Bill "disillusioned" S.
    >
    > They're regular for central Texas. I think they call it chip-seal; they start with an asphalt
    > base, oil it, then spread finely chipped rock on it and basically let the traffic work it into the
    > asphalt base. It set's up a bit of a buzz with a small high pressure tire but with a 1.25" tire at
    > 90psi it's pretty smooth sailing. I suppose the same consistency that lets the gravel embed allows
    > the random junk to do the same.

    One of my most vivid childhood memories is being sent out to play on a hot July day, and truckin'
    along the neighbourhood streets barefoot, and popping tar bubbles in the asphalt with my big toes.
    Then coming back home and innocently ignorantly daring to walk across my mom's freshly washed &
    waxed kitchen floor. And then being relegated to the back porch/stairs with no other company than
    the house cats, and with the soles of my feet smeared with butter in a vain attempt to soften the
    tar-layer on my feet for subsequent washing-off. That was back in the 50's, when asphalt in the
    summer had the consistency of a Sweet Marie candy bar left on a dashboard for too long.

    Modern asphalt is designed to spare kitchen floors, and is probably not as embeddable as it used to
    be. They have these new formulae that don't exude & soften like it used ta.

    cheers, & sticky is sensual, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
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  10. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Thu, 18 Dec 2003 16:25:47 -0600, "Robert Canon"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >OK, so it's not "my penis is a bicycle"... But I've got -pictures-!
    >http://128.83.80.200/bike/sip.html

    Cool.

    I was going to make a comment about the spelling of "imbedded", but I found that it appears to be an
    accepted spelling of that work. Strange...the word was originally, AFAIK, "embedded".
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  11. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Rick Onanian <[email protected]> writes:
    > On Thu, 18 Dec 2003 16:25:47 -0600, "Robert Canon" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>OK, so it's not "my penis is a bicycle"... But I've got -pictures-!
    >>http://128.83.80.200/bike/sip.html
    >
    > Cool.
    >
    > I was going to make a comment about the spelling of "imbedded"

    That would be like making comments about the colour of posters' hair. Or argewing about the spelling
    of gim xhi (deeply in which I often am, too).

    But if we getz what yez says, t'ain't no big wuff. Best ta just tawk norml. Better ta lissen ta
    whutz meant, than to parse whutz spelt.

    Call it "poetic license".

    cheers, Tom

    --
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    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  12. On Thu, 18 Dec 2003 19:40:58 +0000, Tom Keats wrote:

    > One of my most vivid childhood memories is being sent out to play on a hot July day, and truckin'
    > along the neighbourhood streets barefoot, and popping tar bubbles in the asphalt with my big toes.

    I have those memories, too. I always thought the gooey roads were due to the central California heat
    (110F was and is typical on a summer day). It's disappointing to think it's just cheap asphalt.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all _`\(,_ | mysteries, and all
    knowledge; and though I have all faith, so (_)/ (_) | that I could remove mountains, and have not
    charity, I am nothing. [1 Corinth. 13:2]
     
  13. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> writes:
    > On Thu, 18 Dec 2003 19:40:58 +0000, Tom Keats wrote:
    >
    >> One of my most vivid childhood memories is being sent out to play on a hot July day, and
    >> truckin' along the neighbourhood streets barefoot, and popping tar bubbles in the asphalt with
    >> my big toes.
    >
    > I have those memories, too. I always thought the gooey roads were due to the central California
    > heat (110F was and is typical on a summer day). It's disappointing to think it's just cheap
    > asphalt.

    I've often seen 110-120F days in Lytton and Lillooet and Merritt, BC. But the old asphalt would
    readily let go of its tar at a mere 80-90F.

    And it /was/ cheap, horrid, tarry asphalt.

    Anyhow, once again I'm psychically intuiting some sort of need by somebody in this NG, so here's the
    answer (or a pointer to it): http://www.thencamebronson.tv/pages/854773/index.htm

    Uncanny, eh?

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
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  14. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Fri, 19 Dec 2003 01:59:07 GMT, Chris Neary <[email protected]
    > wrote:

    >My guess is the bracket is a clamp off an exhaust system.

    It looks to me like a big end cap. These can be expelled downwards through the sump in certain
    catastrophic failures - I've seen it happen to the car in front while driving along a motorway once,
    and it happened to an Alfa Romeo supplied by the dealership my bro-in-law works for. It had 43 miles
    on the clock.

    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://chapmancentral.demon.co.uk
     
  15. Terry Morse

    Terry Morse Guest

    Tom Keats wrote:

    > One of my most vivid childhood memories is being sent out to play on a hot July day, and truckin'
    > along the neighbourhood streets barefoot, and popping tar bubbles in the asphalt with my big toes.

    You can still get that experience on a hot chip-and-seal road. There's a road on the back side of
    nearby Mt. Hamilton, where the sun bakes the pavement all day long. It's a long and hot climb (4.4
    miles, 8.1%), and the popping tar bubbles stick to your tires. The tires then pick up the errant
    gravel, providing a distraction from the heat.
    --
    terry morse Palo Alto, CA http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/
     
  16. Ray Heindl

    Ray Heindl Guest

    [email protected] (Tom Keats) wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, "Robert Canon" <[email protected]> writes:
    >> OK, so it's not "my penis is a bicycle"...
    >>
    >> But I've got -pictures-!
    >>
    >> http://128.83.80.200/bike/sip.html
    >
    >
    > Heh :) Talk about violating the roads!
    >
    > Maybe millenia from now, archaeologists will dig up this embedded stuff, and base all kinds of
    > speculations and conjectures about our culture on it.

    The most interesting embedded object I've found is a quarter[1]. If it had been on a less-busy road
    I might have tried to pry it out; it appeared to be well stuck in a layer of tar. Another quarter I
    saw once was in a busy intersection, and I value my life at more than 25 cents.

    [1] 0.25-dollar coin, for non-USans.
    --
    Ray Heindl (remove the Xs to reply)
     
  17. Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote:
    : Strange...the word was originally, AFAIK, "embedded".

    hmmm, i'm pretty sure "imbibed" was meant. something i did a lot of last night at the company
    christmas party ..

    .. right up until i fell off the top of the fridge taking down the nearby vent-hood all the while
    still clutching my wine glass. that was the point at which i decided to stop drinking.

    "Bibere humanum est, ergo bibamus"
    --
    david reuteler [email protected]
     
  18. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Fri, 19 Dec 2003 13:25:20 +0000, "Just zis Guy, you know?"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >It looks to me like a big end cap. These can be expelled downwards through the sump in certain
    >catastrophic failures - I've seen it happen to the car in front while driving along a motorway
    >once, and it happened to an Alfa Romeo supplied by the dealership my bro-in-law works for. It had
    >43 miles on the clock.

    In high school shop class, I forgot to tighten mine. I started the engine, and was so surprised that
    it actually ran, and was so happy, that I was really revving it up...I never saw the teacher run so
    fast nor yell so loud as he did trying to get me to stop. He heard the racket, and I think he knew
    what the problem was. Somehow, I didn't throw the damn thing.

    Once I fixed that, it ran perfectly, gave me exactly 5hp on the dyno.

    >Guy
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  19. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Fri, 19 Dec 2003 01:59:07 GMT, Chris Neary <[email protected]
    > may have said:

    >My guess is the bracket is a clamp off an exhaust system.

    I would concur. It's obviously a stamping, it's the right shape, and that's the sort of thing that
    tends to fall off of vehicles anyway.

    --
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    Yes, I have a killfile. If I don't respond to something,
    it's also possible that I'm busy.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  20. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sun, 21 Dec 2003 07:20:24 GMT, Werehatrack
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I would concur. It's obviously a stamping, it's the right shape, and that's the sort of thing that
    >tends to fall off of vehicles anyway.

    Why "obviously" a stamping? I looked at it several times and came to the conclusion that it was most
    likely a solid cast piece such as a bearing cap.

    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://chapmancentral.demon.co.uk
     
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