Have you tried a recumbent?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Rocketman, Feb 12, 2004.

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  1. Rocketman

    Rocketman Guest

    Have any of you ridden a recumbent bike? What did you think of it?

    R
     
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  2. Hunrobe

    Hunrobe Guest

    >"Rocketman" [email protected]

    trolled:

    >Have any of you ridden a recumbent bike? What did you think of it?

    Yes. Interesting but not for me.

    Regards, Bob Hunt
     
  3. Rocketman

    Rocketman Guest

    "Hunrobe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >"Rocketman" [email protected]
    >
    > trolled:

    ???

    > >Have any of you ridden a recumbent bike? What did you think of it?
    >
    > Yes. Interesting but not for me.

    Do you have something against recumbents? Why did you think I was trolling?

    R
     
  4. On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 22:23:21 GMT, "Rocketman"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Hunrobe" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> >"Rocketman" [email protected]
    >>
    >> trolled:
    >
    >???
    >
    >> >Have any of you ridden a recumbent bike? What did you think of it?
    >>
    >> Yes. Interesting but not for me.
    >
    >Do you have something against recumbents? Why did you think I was trolling?

    1) recumbent bicycles have been discussed and debated for nearly a century now.

    2) Google has absorbed the DejaNews usenet archive. use it.

    3) An entire usenet newsgroup for the promotion and discussion of recumbent bicycles exists.
    alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent.

    4) Your initial query was so vague and so unhelpful as to render any attempt at response futile. A
    more specific query--one that might have included your cycling experience, possible models under
    consideration, reasons for interest in recumbents--might have yielded more serious discussions.

    -Luigi

    www.livejournal.com/users/ouij photos, rants, raves.
     
  5. Frkrygow

    Frkrygow Guest

    Luigi de Guzman wrote:

    > On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 22:23:21 GMT, "Rocketman" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>"Hunrobe" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >>>>"Rocketman" [email protected]
    >>>
    >>>trolled:
    >>
    >>???
    >>
    >>
    >>>>Have any of you ridden a recumbent bike? What did you think of it?
    >>>
    >>>Yes. Interesting but not for me.
    >>
    >>Do you have something against recumbents? Why did you think I was trolling?
    >
    >
    > 1) recumbent bicycles have been discussed and debated for nearly a century now.

    ... and it's one of those subjects which seem to divide people into opposing camps! (At least, here
    on Usenet.)

    >
    > 2) Google has absorbed the DejaNews usenet archive. use it.
    >
    > 3) An entire usenet newsgroup for the promotion and discussion of recumbent bicycles exists.
    > alt.rec.bicycles.recumbent.
    >
    > 4) Your initial query was so vague and so unhelpful as to render any attempt at response futile. A
    > more specific query--one that might have included your cycling experience, possible models
    > under consideration, reasons for interest in recumbents--might have yielded more serious
    > discussions.

    All true.

    Nonetheless, my answer to the original question:

    Yes, I've tried many.

    --
    Frank Krygowski [To reply, omit what's between "at" and "cc"]
     
  6. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Thu, 12 Feb 2004 18:49:02 GMT, <[email protected]_s53>,
    "Rocketman" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Have any of you ridden a recumbent bike? What did you think of it?
    >
    >R
    >
    I tried a BikeE and almost bought a bus pass.
    --
    zk
     
  7. Jeffbonny

    Jeffbonny Guest

    On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 18:35:50 -0800, Zoot Katz <[email protected]>
    said:

    >Thu, 12 Feb 2004 18:49:02 GMT, <[email protected]_s53>, "Rocketman"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Have any of you ridden a recumbent bike? What did you think of it?
    >>
    >>R
    >>
    >I tried a BikeE and almost bought a bus pass.

    LOL
     
  8. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 13 Feb 2004 06:18:37 GMT, [email protected] (Hunrobe) wrote:
    >>Why did you think I was trolling?
    >
    >I didn't mean "trolling" in a pejorative way, simply that you seemed to be trying to start a new
    >thread. My apologies if you took offense.

    A new, unproductive, very proliferant and robust thread...
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  9. S O R N I

    S O R N I Guest

    Rick Onanian wrote:
    > On 13 Feb 2004 06:18:37 GMT, [email protected] (Hunrobe) wrote:
    >>> Why did you think I was trolling?
    >>
    >> I didn't mean "trolling" in a pejorative way, simply that you seemed to be trying to start a new
    >> thread. My apologies if you took offense.
    >
    > A new, unproductive, very proliferant and robust thread...

    "Proliferant", Gracie?!?

    Bill "strictly an amateur lifer ant" S.
     
  10. Never ridden one, but would love to try. looks like it would be great, especially on ultra-marathon
    events. As long as there are no real signifigantly steep hills, that is.

    "May you have the wind at your back. And a really low gear for the hills!"

    Chris Zacho ~ "Your Friendly Neighborhood Wheelman"

    Chris'Z Corner http://www.geocities.com/czcorner
     
  11. I have tried many recumbents and own two recumbent trikes, a DF Mountain and Road Bikes , and a
    DF Tandem.

    Recumbents have the advantage of never hurting after a long ride. I have ridden 62mile rides
    and have no back or butt pain, I'm watching upright riders laying down, limping, looking
    severely in pain.

    The downside is that they tend to be pigs on weight, are slower on the uphill (you have to rely on
    gearing and can't stand), but extremely fast on the downhill and flats. In the wind, the recumbent
    rider has an advantage due to the more aerodynamic styling. The choice of bike style has to do with
    your goals. If short trips around the park, general fitness and 25 mile rides are your plan, a low-
    end recumbent such as an EZ-1 or Rans Rocket, Lightning Thunderbolt, etc., would be ideal.

    If you are trying to do centuries, then you would have to spend much more
    to get a very fast recumbent like the Bachetta Aero or Strada, or Reynolds
    TBone. For less than these, you could purchase a "comfort" (high headtube,
    short top tube) DF road bike such as the Giant OCR or Specialized Sequoia.

    I'm a C Class road rider. With my toureasy, I averaged 13MPH. On my Vision R32, Penninger and Wicks
    Trikes about 11. On an upright road bike I'd average about 12. (these are around town figures - on
    longer rides, the numbers would drop about 1MPH to account for stops)

    To me, one needs to average about 15-17 in order to ride a full century with any hope of coming back
    before the event is over. For now, I'll keep doing metric centuries.

    As for your vehicle of choice, try some of each and see what you like. Unfortunately, recumbents are
    not easy to test ride in most areas. People in WI and CA seem to have the advantage. Anyone in NY or
    NJ is free to try mine.
     
  12. Mike Euritt

    Mike Euritt Guest

    Wow, Jonathan, a reasoned response about recumbents...thanks

    I too ride both, and I live in the mountains. My DF is a carbon fiber bike, and I was a lousy
    climber on it, I don't own a body that climbs, but i only lost about 1.5 mph on the climb I do for
    my work outs, 1000 ft, two miles. And that is on the Rans Stratus, I've yet to get the new Corsa out
    on that hill because of weather. Time hasn't allowed me to train on the bents like I did on the DF
    the year before.

    On the upright I do have all my personal best rides. Lake Tahoe was almost a mile an hour faster
    than on the bent tandem, the regular loop, about half a mile faster than the Stratus, but this is
    all with ut the benefit of a lot of miles on the recumbents. On the DF, I struggled to keep a steady
    18-20 on the flats of a long (40+mile) ride. On the Stratus with fairing, that was no problem. On
    the Corsa, without the benefit of conditioning, I can maintain 23-25 with no fairing. Sprints are a
    whole different thing, and again the bents will be faster for me than my DF. My trike is about the
    same speed top end as the DF, but bad roads hurt its performance as much as big hills, it is the
    slowest, but most fun over all.

    it does come down to hills, training to spin to get up a hill. But that is the story for uprights as
    well. Most of us weekend warriors can't stand a climb for two miles, so it is sit and spin or even
    mash. Standing is great, it does give muscles a chance to recover, while others come into play,
    assuming you have the cardio to support recovery of one muscle group while working the other.

    I couldn't get a DF that I could stand to ride for more than about a metric century. Whatever I did
    about mile 70 I would always wonder why am I doing this to myself. I own 5 bents, two trikes, one is
    a tandem, three two wheelers, again one is a tandem, one is a SWB high racer the other a faired LWB
    and any one of those I can do 100 miles and look at my watch and think..."oh, there is enough time
    left in the day to do it again" This year will be double centuries and loaded tours, something that
    just hurt me thinking about on the DF's, solo or tandem.
     
  13. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Zoot Katz wrote:

    > I tried a BikeE and almost bought a bus pass.

    A BikeE is a semi-recumbent. With its upright seat and low BB, it is not particularly aerodynamic
    and will typically be slower than a conventional road bike (at equal rider power outputs). The
    upright seating position is also not the most comfortable for longer distances. This is not to say
    that the BikeE is a bad design, but that it is not the recumbent equivalent of an upright road bike.

    The BikeE riding experience should not be considered representative of recumbents that are of a
    significantly different configuration.

    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities
     
  14. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Jonathan Kaplan wrote:

    > ... The choice of bike style has to do with your goals. If short trips around the park, general
    > fitness and 25 mile rides are your plan, a low-end recumbent such as an EZ-1 or Rans Rocket,
    > Lightning Thunderbolt, etc., would be ideal.
    >
    > If you are trying to do centuries, then you would have to spend much more to get a very fast
    > recumbent like the Bachetta Aero or Strada, or Reynolds TBone....

    The RANS (note correct capitalization) Rocket [1] is only an "entry level" recumbent because in its
    stock form it has fairly low end components to keep the price down. I have ridden centuries on a
    RANS Rocket with average rolling speeds in the 16-17 mph (~27 kph) range with no discomfort. The
    Lightning Thunderbolt should provide similar levels of comfort and performance.

    [1] <http://www.ransbikes.com/2004Bikes/Rocket.htm>.

    Tom Sherman - Quad Cities
     
  15. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Thu, 12 Feb 2004 18:49:02 GMT, "Rocketman"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    <[email protected]_s53>:

    >Have any of you ridden a recumbent bike?

    Yep.

    >What did you think of it?

    It's parked in my kitchen right now. It was simply too much fun not to buy :)

    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://chapmancentral.demon.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at the University of Washington.
     
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