Hayes hydraulic tech ??



B

Bilphma

Guest
after purchasing a rear brake online, i soon discovered i need to shorten
the length of the rear hydraulic hayes disc line. the few shops in town
seem a little intimidated. can i do this myself? any insight would be much
appreciated. tia..
 
D

Doug Huffman

Guest
I've used Hayes hydraulic disc brakes for six years and 35K+ miles on my
recumbent single bike, a Vanguard. Any time I've had to strip the bike then
I've had to remove the brakes and lines.

This I do by removing the tube-nut at the slave cylinder end. The
'olives' - the little compression rings - are non-reusable. With a razor
knife and patience, cut the tube as close to the tube-nut and olive as
possible and in an area of the tube undamaged. I might have used 1/4 inch
of tube per iteration.

On re-installation, thread the tube, thread the tube-nut on, thread the
olive on and slip the tube over the slave cylinder nipple. Slide the olive
down as close as possible to the joint without excessive force since the nut
will pull it down the last little bit. Slide the nut down and over the
olive and engage the threads. Turn the nut down until the torque
specification is reached. Fill and vent.

I thought that these steps were detailed - and the torque specified - in the
technical stuff available on-line.


"Bilphma" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s02...
| after purchasing a rear brake online, i soon discovered i need to shorten
| the length of the rear hydraulic hayes disc line. the few shops in town
| seem a little intimidated. can i do this myself? any insight would be
much
| appreciated. tia..
|
|
 
M

Michael Dart

Guest
"Bilphma" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s02...
> after purchasing a rear brake online, i soon discovered i need to shorten
> the length of the rear hydraulic hayes disc line. the few shops in town
> seem a little intimidated. can i do this myself? any insight would be

much
> appreciated. tia..
>
>


If it's a newer G2 caliper (HFX-9) the caliper end of the hose has a
permanent fitting on it so you have to work from the master cylinder/lever
end. No matter it's best to work from that end since any air introduced
into the system will be closer to the bleed vent. You will need a new
"olive" for the compression fitting. If you have Mag or Comp levers you
undo the compression nut and carefully pull the hose off the barb fitting.
Pull it straight off as the barb fitting is easily broken off, so no side
twisting. On the HFX lever the barb fitting is a separate piece and is
pressed into the hose. To remove it cut the old olive off with diag cutters
and slice open the hose 1/2 inch lengthwise from the end. Cut the hose to
length (razor blade or Park housing cutters works) and re-install. Tighten
the compression nut until the olive just starts to show where the hose comes
out. You will also need a bleed kit but in addition to that replace the
little squeeze bottle with a large BD syringe (avail at a drug store). It
really makes the job easy. Also while bleeding snap the lever a couple
times to shock air bubbles loose in the system. Tech info is available on
http://www.hayesdiscbrake.com though the server seems to be down right now.

Also wear rubber exam gloves and keep any brake fluid off painted surfaces.
The stuff dries your skin out and will eat the paint off your bike.

This all sounds like a lot of BS to go through but it's really not that bad.
Hydraulic disc brakes work so well I'll never go back to rim brakes.

Mike
 

Similar threads

A
Replies
8
Views
858
S