Headset heresy

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by David M. Grey, Mar 2, 2003.

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  1. I am building up a 95 Schwinn Homegrown as a beater bike for use around town. Is there any reason
    why I can't install the headset bearing cups by carfully banging them into place with a piece of
    wood and rubber mallet.

    I know that conventional wisdom says use a headset press, but I am not sure why? Thanks.

    --
    [email protected]
     
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  2. You don't need a headset press, but you also shouldn't pound on them with a rubber mallet either.
    The cups need to be pressed in very evenly, which is hard to do without supporting everything. If
    the headset begins to go in at an angle, you can damage the headtube (by making it oblong).

    But there's a simple fix. Use two blocks of wood (maybe 1 by 4s) and either a c-clamp or a vise. Put
    one block over the bare headtube end, and the other on top of the cup that you're pressing into the
    frame. Then slowly tighten the c-clamp or vise, watching to make sure that it's going in straight.
    If it really fights you, use the rubber mallet to tap on the block (the one over the cup being
    installed).

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

    "David M. Grey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am building up a 95 Schwinn Homegrown as a beater bike for use around town. Is there any reason
    > why I can't install the headset bearing cups by carfully banging them into place with a piece of
    > wood and rubber mallet.
    >
    > I know that conventional wisdom says use a headset press, but I am not
    sure
    > why? Thanks.
    >
    > --
    > [email protected]
     
  3. Mark Wolfe

    Mark Wolfe Guest

    You can make a homemade press with a bolt that is long enough to pass through two blocks of wood
    with a few washers to keep them from pulling through. Works great. :)

    Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:

    > You don't need a headset press, but you also shouldn't pound on them with a rubber mallet either.
    > The cups need to be pressed in very evenly, which is hard to do without supporting everything. If
    > the headset begins to go in at an angle, you can damage the headtube (by making it oblong).
    >
    > But there's a simple fix. Use two blocks of wood (maybe 1 by 4s) and either a c-clamp or a vise.
    > Put one block over the bare headtube end, and the other on top of the cup that you're pressing
    > into the frame. Then slowly tighten the c-clamp or vise, watching to make sure that it's going in
    > straight. If it really fights you, use the rubber mallet to tap on the block (the one over the cup
    > being installed).
    >
    > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
    >
    >
    > "David M. Grey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> I am building up a 95 Schwinn Homegrown as a beater bike for use around town. Is there any reason
    >> why I can't install the headset bearing cups by carfully banging them into place with a piece of
    >> wood and rubber mallet.
    >>
    >> I know that conventional wisdom says use a headset press, but I am not
    > sure
    >> why? Thanks.
    >>
    >> --
    >> [email protected]
    >
     
  4. On Mon, 3 Mar 2003, Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    > You don't need a headset press, but you also shouldn't pound on them with a rubber mallet either.
    > The cups need to be pressed in very evenly, which is hard to do without supporting everything. If
    > the headset begins to go in at an angle, you can damage the headtube (by making it oblong).

    Let me add. Sometimes I have found the fit a tad too tight, so it was necessary to file off some
    metal beforehand.

    > But there's a simple fix. Use two blocks of wood (maybe 1 by 4s) and either a c-clamp or a vise.

    Wish I had such a huge vise!, a C-clamp I would say. That's my own way of doing the job, being an
    amateur cabinet maker it was an easy guess.

    Sergio Pisa
     
  5. Harris

    Harris Guest

    David M. Grey <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I am building up a 95 Schwinn Homegrown as a beater bike for use around town. Is there any reason
    > why I can't install the headset bearing cups by carfully banging them into place with a piece of
    > wood and rubber mallet.

    Use a threaded rod with hefty washers and nuts at each end. I bought such a device from Nashbar many
    years ago, and it works fine. You can easily make your own. Make sure the frame is properly prepped.

    Art Harris
     
  6. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Mark Wolfe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > You can make a homemade press with a bolt that is long enough to pass through two blocks of wood
    > with a few washers to keep them from pulling through. Works great. :)
    >
    Friend of mine did that. Says it works great. I prefer the Park press at the LBS. Costs me a 6-pack
    of beer each time, but it beats buying a $125 tool! That's not quite 21 presses before the tool is
    saving me money. I've gone through 5-6 so far...

    Mike

    >
    > Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    >
    > > You don't need a headset press, but you also shouldn't pound on them
    with
    > > a rubber mallet either. The cups need to be pressed in very evenly, which is hard to do without
    > > supporting everything. If the headset begins to go
    in
    > > at an angle, you can damage the headtube (by making it oblong).
    > >
    > > But there's a simple fix. Use two blocks of wood (maybe 1 by 4s) and either a c-clamp or a vise.
    > > Put one block over the bare headtube end, and the other on top of the cup that you're pressing
    > > into the frame. Then
    slowly
    > > tighten the c-clamp or vise, watching to make sure that it's going in straight. If it really
    > > fights you, use the rubber mallet to tap on the block (the one over the cup being installed).
    > >
    > > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
    > >
    > >
    > > "David M. Grey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > >> I am building up a 95 Schwinn Homegrown as a beater bike for use around town. Is there any
    > >> reason why I can't install the headset bearing cups by carfully banging them into place with a
    > >> piece of wood and rubber mallet.
    > >>
    > >> I know that conventional wisdom says use a headset press, but I am not
    > > sure
    > >> why? Thanks.
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> [email protected]
    > >>
    > >
     
  7. Ant

    Ant Guest

    Mark Wolfe <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > You can make a homemade press with a bolt that is long enough to pass through two blocks of wood
    > with a few washers to keep them from pulling through. Works great. :)
    >

    i hear this all the time.. so i made one. when i tried to press my first set of cups with this set
    up, the first one went in like butter, true and easy, the second one wouldnt go in straight no
    matter what i
    did. so i ended up tapping it in with a block of wood and a hammer. it took forever, becuawe i did
    it in such small increments so as not to risk an oblong set, but it works dandy. the headset
    bolt-nut-washer press would work perfectly if i had some spacer inside the steering column to
    hold the bolt centered. everytime the bolt got even the slightets bit off center, it would then
    press the cup in off center. next time, ill just turn myself a couple spacers on a lathe, five
    minutes work, but do know- its not infallible with just a fat bolt for a headset press!

    (personally, i think the wood block method, if you are careful and judicious and Slooooow will
    provide results as good and as damage-free as any.)

    anthony
     
  8. Pete Geurds

    Pete Geurds Guest

  9. On 3 Mar 2003, ant wrote:
    > true and easy, the second one wouldnt go in straight no matter what i
    > did. so i ended up tapping it in with a block of wood and a hammer. it took forever, becuawe i did
    > it in such small increments so as not to risk an oblong set, but it works dandy.

    In such cases I prefer to (judiciously) use a file to improve the fit. It has to be tight, but
    not so tight.

    Sergio Pisa
     
  10. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Sergio SERVADIO" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > On 3 Mar 2003, ant wrote:
    > > true and easy, the second one wouldnt go in straight no matter what i
    > > did. so i ended up tapping it in with a block of wood and a hammer. it took forever, becuawe i
    > > did it in such small increments so as not to risk an oblong set, but it works dandy.
    >
    > In such cases I prefer to (judiciously) use a file to improve the fit. It has to be tight, but not
    > so tight.

    Yes, that would work, I suppose.

    Campagnolo "GO-NOGO" gauges are the right tool, followed up with the appropriate mill if indicated.
    This is trivially quick at any competent LBS.

    I read here frequently about clever and time-consuming work-arounds to shop installation. Personally
    I view this like home engine assembly. Even the practical man send out the valve grinding and things
    of that nature. The service charge is small, the tool cost is high and there's no reward for
    suffering.

    OTOH I have corresponded recently with another r.b.t. afficionado whose tales of his LBS's
    incompetence, rudeness and ignorance would lead one to go to great lengths to avoid them.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >I am building up a 95 Schwinn Homegrown as a beater bike for use around town. Is there any reason
    >why I can't install the headset bearing cups by carfully banging them into place with a piece of
    >wood and rubber mallet.

    I've done this a few times before I got my threaded rod and washer head set press. It works, but you
    need to be carefull.

    >I know that conventional wisdom says use a headset press, but I am not sure why? Thanks.

    It is faster and there is less chance of damaging the headset.

    -----------------
    Alex __O _-\<,_ (_)/ (_)
     
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