Headset heresy

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by David M. Grey, Mar 2, 2003.

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  1. I am building up a 95 Schwinn Homegrown as a beater bike for use around town. Is there any reason
    why I can't install the headset bearing cups by carefully banging them into place with a piece of
    wood and rubber mallet?

    I know conventional wisdom says use a headset press, but why? Thanks. /Dave
    --
    [email protected]
     
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  2. D.Putnam

    D.Putnam Guest

    Don't listen to the Park Tool mafia. They'd have you buy a shiny new tool for every repair job. I've
    used a claw hammer and a piece of lumber for headset installation. Works like a charm. For head set
    removal I use a long wide metal punch. Just tap them out from the inside. The bearing race that goes
    on the fork is a little tricky. I use some pipe and the obligatory mallet and wood. Never scratched
    or ruined a part! The only tools I buy are indispensable ones, ie: Cable cutters, crankset wrenches,
    Shimano cassette thingy...
     
  3. On Mon, 3 Mar 2003, D.Putnam wrote:

    > The bearing race that goes on the fork is a little tricky. I use some
    > pipe and the obligatory mallet and wood.

    I think I have a better solution for this. Stick the fork in between the jaws of your vise, no
    clamping! Close the jaws so that the race sits on them but the fork itself is free. Hit the
    fork from above with a mallet, or with a good hammer by interposing a wooden block not to ruin
    the threads.

    Sergio Pisa
     
  4. David-<< I am building up a 95 Schwinn Homegrown as a beater bike for use around town. Is there any
    reason why I can't install the headset bearing cups by carefully banging them into place with a
    piece of wood and rubber mallet?

    << I know conventional wisdom says use a headset press, but why? >><BR><BR>

    So ya don't break a headset(aluminum) cup...

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  5. "D.Putnam" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Don't listen to the Park Tool mafia. They'd have you buy a shiny new tool for every repair job.
    > I've used a claw hammer and a piece of lumber for headset installation. Works like a charm. For
    > head set removal I use a long wide metal punch. Just tap them out from the inside. The bearing
    > race that goes on the fork is a little tricky. I use some pipe and the obligatory mallet and wood.
    > Never scratched or ruined a part! The only tools I buy are indispensable ones, ie: Cable cutters,
    > crankset wrenches, Shimano cassette thingy...

    me use big rocks!
     
  6. > So ya don't break a headset(aluminum) cup...

    Or a frame!

    Jeez, it's no wonder I've seen so many f'd up headsets come through the shops over the years! Use
    the right tool for the job, it's just better that way! --Jim
     
  7. Ant

    Ant Guest

    [email protected] (Meccanico di Bici) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...

    > Jeez, it's no wonder I've seen so many f'd up headsets come through the shops over the years! Use
    > the right tool for the job, it's just better that way! --Jim

    I hate to say it, but if i used the 'right tool for the job' every time i had a job, id either be
    working a lot more shifts, enjoying bike work a lot less, or being my LBS's New Favorite Customer at
    the expense of my wallet.

    one day i will break something precious, and it will be worth it for all the countless jobs ive
    pulled off with excellent results without the Park-Shimano-Campagnolo bearing milling pin spanner
    press wrench. (chrome plated, CNC milled, generous padding)

    Now can you pass me my headset press? Yes, thats the one. You can tell I didn't skimp, either. My
    wooden block is mahogany, not 2x4.
     
  8. On 6 Mar 2003, ant wrote:
    > Now can you pass me my headset press? Yes, thats the one. You can tell I didn't skimp, either. My
    > wooden block is mahogany, not 2x4.

    Isn't that too soft a wood?

    Sergio Pisa
     
  9. Ant

    Ant Guest

    Sergio SERVADIO <[email protected]mail.df.unipi.it> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 6 Mar 2003, ant wrote:
    > > Now can you pass me my headset press? Yes, thats the one. You can tell I didn't skimp, either.
    > > My wooden block is mahogany, not 2x4.
    >
    > Isn't that too soft a wood?
    >
    > Sergio Pisa

    It's softer than, say, maple. Works fine though. I happened to have some scrap lying around after a
    project, and didnt happen to have either maple or tool steel in the shape of a Park tool. the block
    i used for my last headset press job will definitely last for a couple more rounds.
     
  10. Java Man

    Java Man Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Sergio SERVADIO <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > On 6 Mar 2003, ant wrote:
    > > > Now can you pass me my headset press? Yes, thats the one. You can tell I didn't skimp, either.
    > > > My wooden block is mahogany, not 2x4.
    > >
    > > Isn't that too soft a wood?
    > >
    > > Sergio Pisa
    >
    > It's softer than, say, maple. Works fine though. I happened to have some scrap lying around after
    > a project, and didnt happen to have either maple or tool steel in the shape of a Park tool. the
    > block i used for my last headset press job will definitely last for a couple more rounds.
    >
    Douglas Fir is perfect.

    Rick
     
  11. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    "Java Man" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > Sergio SERVADIO <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > On 6 Mar 2003, ant wrote:
    > > > > Now can you pass me my headset press? Yes, thats the one. You can
    tell
    > > > > I didn't skimp, either. My wooden block is mahogany, not 2x4.
    > > >
    > > > Isn't that too soft a wood?
    > > >
    > > > Sergio Pisa
    > >
    > > It's softer than, say, maple. Works fine though. I happened to have some scrap lying around
    > > after a project, and didnt happen to have either maple or tool steel in the shape of a Park
    > > tool. the block i used for my last headset press job will definitely last for a couple more
    > > rounds.
    > >
    > Douglas Fir is perfect.
    >
    > Rick

    If you were a REAL wood worker, you'd turn down a piece of whatever your favorite wood is to the
    shape of the inside of the HS cups, just like the Park tool... THEN use the bolt and washer method.
    But I'd be willing to bet that not too many of us would go to that length...

    I'm not into wood. If it isn't mechanical, forget it!

    Mike
     
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