Headwinds



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Mikeyankee

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One of my cycling mentors often said, "Hills build strength and headwinds build character."

Mike Yankee

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David Storm

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Uphills build strength. One of my mentors often told me, "Any dammed fool can go fast downhill."

"MikeYankee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
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> One of my cycling mentors often said, "Hills build strength and headwinds
build
> character."
>
>
> Mike Yankee
>
> (Address is munged to thwart spammers. To reply, delete everything after "com".)
 
R

Rick

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"MikeYankee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
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> One of my cycling mentors often said, "Hills build strength and headwinds
build
> character."
>
>
> Mike Yankee

In my neck of the woods (SW Washington along the Lower Columbia River), headwinds are a way of life.
An out and back course can end up with headwinds in both directions. The only way I can keep this
from driving me crazy, is to imagine I'm climbing. I ride on the top or the hoods and take the full
brunt of the wind with my chest. So, I submit that headwinds build strength also.

Rick
 
R

Ron Hardin

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I don't see why either hills or headwinds build strength. You just gear down for both of them.
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P

Per ElmsäTer

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"Ron Hardin" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I don't see why either hills or headwinds build strength. You just gear down for both of them.

If that's all you do you're going to lose a lot of speed. Spinning a higher gear than everybody else
will take you up that hill faster than everybody else.

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Perre
 
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Ron Hardin

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Per Elmsäter wrote:
> > I don't see why either hills or headwinds build strength. You just gear down for both of them.
>
> If that's all you do you're going to lose a lot of speed. Spinning a higher gear than everybody
> else will take you up that hill faster than everybody else.

You're just saying that you take wind or hills as a reason to stop pacing yourself perfectly. You
don't need wind or hills for that.
--
Ron Hardin [email protected]

On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
 
P

Per ElmsäTer

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"Ron Hardin" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Per Elmsäter wrote:
> > > I don't see why either hills or headwinds build strength. You just gear down for both of them.
> >
> > If that's all you do you're going to lose a lot of speed. Spinning a
higher
> > gear than everybody else will take you up that hill faster than
everybody
> > else.
>
> You're just saying that you take wind or hills as a reason to stop pacing yourself perfectly. You
> don't need wind or hills for that.

No I'm saying it's the easiest place to drop everybody else. Once I get my opening I'm back to
pacing myself again.

Actually today on a group ride I was having some problems keeping up with the speed and was starting
to get a bit winded. At this point I caught site of maybe five minutes worth of hillclimb ahead of
us. The first thought that entered my mind was. Far out now I get a chance to get my pulse back down
again. I stayed in the paceline and when we were at the top of the hills my pulse had dropped 20
beats. I love hills.

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Perre
 
S

schikerbiker

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"Ron Hardin" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I don't see why either hills or headwinds build strength. You just gear down for both of them.

Well you can change to a gear that will make hills easy but slow. I don't mind hills and enjoy the
challenge of trying to keep a certain speed and gear going up them. I don't care for headwinds
because they are constantly changing. What I hate most are very strong crosswinds, the type that can
almost blow you into the road or into the ditch. But it is part of riding a bike.
 
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