Heart Murmur Diagnosis?

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by An Metet, Nov 9, 2003.

  1. An Metet

    An Metet Guest

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    I mentioned to the dentist about having Scarlet Fever as a child and an innocent
    murmur as a baby. Now they won't give me a cleaning without pre-medication
    until I provide documentation saying that I don't have a heart murmur, or that
    it is innocent.

    I'm pretty sure I don't have a murmur, but they made it sound like something
    I should be worried about.

    The question is, should I just try and get some documentation from when I was
    a baby that shows it was just an innocent murmur... or should I get my heart
    looked at?

    General practitioners have listened to my heart with a stethoscope in the past,
    and I believe I had an EKG a few years ago. I don't recall ever hearing the
    word murmur mentioned. So, if I were to schedule a visit, then I imagine I'd
    have to see a cardiologist, since the GPs don't seem to find anything.

    Thanks,

    Allen Gere
     
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  2. Herb

    Herb Guest

    I had an innocent murmur as a very young child. No doctors noticed it
    as I grew up. When I reached about 40 or 50 the doctors began noticing
    it again. Eventually I needed to have the valve replaced. I do not
    think an EKG would detect a murmur. Probably and ultara sound
    (echocardiogram) would detect it. A doctor with a stethoscope should
    also be able to detect a murmur especially if they are looking for one.

    --

    Herb
    Boulder, CO



    "An Metet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > NOTE: This message was sent thru a mail2news gateway.
    > No effort was made to verify the identity of the sender.
    > --------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > I mentioned to the dentist about having Scarlet Fever as a child and

    an innocent
    > murmur as a baby. Now they won't give me a cleaning without

    pre-medication
    > until I provide documentation saying that I don't have a heart murmur,

    or that
    > it is innocent.
    >
    > I'm pretty sure I don't have a murmur, but they made it sound like

    something
    > I should be worried about.
    >
    > The question is, should I just try and get some documentation from

    when I was
    > a baby that shows it was just an innocent murmur... or should I get my

    heart
    > looked at?
    >
    > General practitioners have listened to my heart with a stethoscope in

    the past,
    > and I believe I had an EKG a few years ago. I don't recall ever

    hearing the
    > word murmur mentioned. So, if I were to schedule a visit, then I

    imagine I'd
    > have to see a cardiologist, since the GPs don't seem to find anything.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Allen Gere
    >
     
  3. An Metet wrote:

    > NOTE: This message was sent thru a mail2news gateway.
    > No effort was made to verify the identity of the sender.
    > --------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > I mentioned to the dentist about having Scarlet Fever as a child and an innocent
    > murmur as a baby. Now they won't give me a cleaning without pre-medication
    > until I provide documentation saying that I don't have a heart murmur, or that
    > it is innocent.
    >
    > I'm pretty sure I don't have a murmur, but they made it sound like something
    > I should be worried about.
    >
    > The question is, should I just try and get some documentation from when I was
    > a baby that shows it was just an innocent murmur... or should I get my heart
    > looked at?
    >
    > General practitioners have listened to my heart with a stethoscope in the past,
    > and I believe I had an EKG a few years ago. I don't recall ever hearing the
    > word murmur mentioned. So, if I were to schedule a visit, then I imagine I'd
    > have to see a cardiologist, since the GPs don't seem to find anything.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Allen Gere


    Scarlet fever is not associated with valvular heart disease. Perhaps there has been
    some confusion with Rheumatic fever which can damage heart valves making them more
    susceptible to infection even from a simple teeth cleaning. If your GP is confident
    that there is no murmur and your EKG is normal, the dentist should be able to accept
    a note from your GP that you can have the teeth cleaning without antibiotics.

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com
     
  4. On Sun, 9 Nov 2003 23:36:35 -0500, An Metet
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >NOTE: This message was sent thru a mail2news gateway.
    >No effort was made to verify the identity of the sender.
    >--------------------------------------------------------
    >
    >I mentioned to the dentist about having Scarlet Fever as a child and an innocent
    >murmur as a baby. Now they won't give me a cleaning without pre-medication
    >until I provide documentation saying that I don't have a heart murmur, or that
    >it is innocent.
    >
    >I'm pretty sure I don't have a murmur, but they made it sound like something
    >I should be worried about.
    >
    >The question is, should I just try and get some documentation from when I was
    >a baby that shows it was just an innocent murmur... or should I get my heart
    >looked at?
    >
    >General practitioners have listened to my heart with a stethoscope in the past,
    >and I believe I had an EKG a few years ago. I don't recall ever hearing the
    >word murmur mentioned. So, if I were to schedule a visit, then I imagine I'd
    >have to see a cardiologist, since the GPs don't seem to find anything.
    >
    >Thanks,
    >
    >Allen Gere
    >


    Are you sure it was Scarlet Fever. In 2000 I was told I must have had
    Rheumatic Fever as a child as they were hearing murmurs. Sounds like
    the dentist is being a bit over-cautious but unless you want to find a
    different one you may have to have a cardiologist confirm that your
    heart is fine and that you do not need prophylactic antibiotics before
    dental treatment. I will always have to have antibiotics before
    treatment, even cleaning. The heart can become infected
    (endocarditis) if the teeth of a susceptial person are not taken care
    of properly. This is why your dentist is being so cautious. Recently
    I met a young man in a heart hospital I attend and the reason he was
    there was a result of a routine visit to his dentist. He had ben an
    in- patient for a couple of months. Diana
     
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