Heart Rate Monitor HRM and Electrical EMR Interference

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Ian Levit, Mar 5, 2004.

  1. Ian Levit

    Ian Levit Guest

    I have a Polar Prograiner XP Heart Rate Monitor (HRM) which stops receiving heart rate transmissions
    from the chest strap, when there is strong electrical interference from power lines. Under normal
    conditions the XT works fine, but on a part of the bike trail I use in Northern Virginia, between
    Ashburn and Sterling, the bike trail and the power companies high power lines run in parallel. At
    the point, the XP stops receiving the heart rate from the transmitter. It may flicker in every once
    and a while, but it is useless.

    My question is, does anyone who has any experience with similar conditions, found an HRM that
    functions better the the Polar XT under these kinds of conditions, that is EMR interference from
    high power electrical lines.

    Thanks

    Ian Levit [email protected]
     
    Tags:


  2. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Fri, 5 Mar 2004 18:41:45 -0500, "Ian Levit"
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    >between Ashburn and Sterling, the bike trail and the power companies high power lines run in
    >parallel. At the point, the XP stops receiving the heart rate from the transmitter. It may flicker
    >in every once and a while, but it is useless.

    Your HRM is working properly. It's actually your heart which is stopping. The EM field disrupts the
    electrochemical nerve signals to your heart, and your heart goes into a continuous blood impellation
    motion rather than the usual beating pump motion. Your HRM can't measure this mode.

    >My question is, does anyone who has any experience with similar conditions, found an HRM that
    >functions better the the Polar XT under these kinds of conditions, that is EMR interference from
    >high power electrical lines.

    I've found that an automotive fuel flow gauge works well. You must choose a major artery and
    interrupt it with the gauge's sender.

    Another option is to reverse your HRM so that you set the rate and it controls your heart. You'll
    need two inline power taps and some minor reprogramming of the HRM.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  3. Frank121

    Frank121 Guest

    Must be a full moon....;-)

    "Rick Onanian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > On Fri, 5 Mar 2004 18:41:45 -0500, "Ian Levit" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >between Ashburn and Sterling, the bike trail and the power companies high power lines run in
    > >parallel. At the point, the XP stops receiving the
    heart
    > >rate from the transmitter. It may flicker in every once and a while, but
    it
    > >is useless.
    >
    > Your HRM is working properly. It's actually your heart which is stopping. The EM field disrupts
    > the electrochemical nerve signals to your heart, and your heart goes into a continuous blood
    > impellation motion rather than the usual beating pump motion. Your HRM can't measure this mode.
    >
    > >My question is, does anyone who has any experience with similar
    conditions,
    > >found an HRM that functions better the the Polar XT under these kinds of conditions, that is EMR
    > >interference from high power electrical lines.
    >
    > I've found that an automotive fuel flow gauge works well. You must choose a major artery and
    > interrupt it with the gauge's sender.
    >
    > Another option is to reverse your HRM so that you set the rate and it controls your heart. You'll
    > need two inline power taps and some minor reprogramming of the HRM.
    > --
    > Rick Onanian
     
  4. Ian Levit

    Ian Levit Guest

    Very funnny.

    Ian

    "Rick Onanian" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > On Fri, 5 Mar 2004 18:41:45 -0500, "Ian Levit"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >between Ashburn and Sterling, the bike trail and the
    > >power companies high power lines run in parallel. At the
    > >point, the XP stops receiving the
    heart
    > >rate from the transmitter. It may flicker in every once
    > >and a while, but
    it
    > >is useless.
    >
    > Your HRM is working properly. It's actually your heart
    > which is stopping. The EM field disrupts the
    > electrochemical nerve signals to your heart, and your
    > heart goes into a continuous blood impellation motion
    > rather than the usual beating pump motion. Your HRM can't
    > measure this mode.
    >
    > >My question is, does anyone who has any experience with
    > >similar
    conditions,
    > >found an HRM that functions better the the Polar XT under
    > >these kinds of conditions, that is EMR interference from
    > >high power electrical lines.
    >
    > I've found that an automotive fuel flow gauge works well.
    > You must choose a major artery and interrupt it with the
    > gauge's sender.
    >
    > Another option is to reverse your HRM so that you set the
    > rate and it controls your heart. You'll need two inline
    > power taps and some minor reprogramming of the HRM.
    > --
    > Rick Onanian
     
  5. J Morelstein

    J Morelstein Guest

    check the archives for this website with google. I know from
    old posts 1) that this is a well-known problem with Polar
    HRM's and 2) posters to the group have mentioned other
    models which are (at least more) immune to this type of
    interference.

    "Ian Levit" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have a Polar Prograiner XP Heart Rate Monitor (HRM)
    > which stops
    receiving
    > heart rate transmissions from the chest strap, when there
    > is strong electrical interference from power lines. Under
    > normal conditions the XT works fine, but on a part of the
    > bike trail I use in Northern Virginia, between Ashburn and
    > Sterling, the bike trail and the power companies high
    > power lines run in parallel. At the point, the XP stops
    > receiving the
    heart
    > rate from the transmitter. It may flicker in every once
    > and a while, but
    it
    > is useless.
    >
    > My question is, does anyone who has any experience
    > with similar
    conditions,
    > found an HRM that functions better the the Polar XT under
    > these kinds of conditions, that is EMR interference from
    > high power electrical lines.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Ian Levit [email protected]
     
  6. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    "Ian Levit" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have a Polar Prograiner XP Heart Rate Monitor (HRM)
    > which stops receiving heart rate transmissions from the
    > chest strap, when there is strong electrical interference
    > from power lines. Under normal conditions the XT works
    > fine, but on a part of the bike trail I use in Northern
    > Virginia, between Ashburn and Sterling, the bike trail and
    > the power companies high power lines run in parallel. At
    > the point, the XP stops receiving the heart rate from the
    > transmitter. It may flicker in every once and a while, but
    > it is useless.
    >
    > My question is, does anyone who has any experience with
    > similar conditions, found an HRM that functions better the
    > the Polar XT under these kinds of conditions, that is EMR
    > interference from high power electrical lines.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Ian Levit [email protected]

    Dear Ian,

    Here's an appallingly ignorant question.

    What happens if you move the transmitter and receiver
    closer? If reception improves, could any sort of antenna in
    the form of a fine wire run down an arm from the transmitter
    help things?

    Carl Fogel
     
  7. Ian Levit

    Ian Levit Guest

    I've moved the watch as close to the chest transmitter as
    possible, and that doesn't help. I think what one would need
    is a stronger transmitter, or the ability to boost the
    transmitter in the chest belt. Perhaps if Polar could add a
    standard and extra strong signal setting somehow on the
    chest belt transmitter. That is very unlikely.

    I would guess that Polar wants to get by with as small a
    signal as possible, to preserve batter life, and that is
    reasonable.

    As I said earlier, except for this problem which results
    from VERY strong interference from very high power lines
    running parallel to the bike path, I haven't had any other
    serious problems with the Polar Product. It has always
    worked just fine (accept for an occasional error code which
    is incomprehensible!).

    Ian

    "Carl Fogel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Ian Levit" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > I have a Polar Prograiner XP Heart Rate Monitor (HRM)
    > > which stops
    receiving
    > > heart rate transmissions from the chest strap, when
    > > there is strong electrical interference from power
    > > lines. Under normal conditions the
    XT
    > > works fine, but on a part of the bike trail I use in
    > > Northern Virginia, between Ashburn and Sterling, the
    > > bike trail and the power companies
    high
    > > power lines run in parallel. At the point, the XP stops
    > > receiving the
    heart
    > > rate from the transmitter. It may flicker in every once
    > > and a while,
    but it
    > > is useless.
    > >
    > > My question is, does anyone who has any experience with
    > > similar
    conditions,
    > > found an HRM that functions better the the Polar XT
    > > under these kinds of conditions, that is EMR
    > > interference from high power electrical lines.
    > >
    > > Thanks
    > >
    > > Ian Levit [email protected]
    >
    > Dear Ian,
    >
    > Here's an appallingly ignorant question.
    >
    > What happens if you move the transmitter and receiver
    > closer? If reception improves, could any sort of antenna
    > in the form of a fine wire run down an arm from the
    > transmitter help things?
    >
    > Carl Fogel
     
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