Heart Rate Monitors



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Brendo

Guest
When buying a HRM do you look for a bicycle HRM (that does speed,
cadence, etc) or would you rather have two devices, one for bike info,
one for HR info?

I already have the bike computer, so I figure that buying a HRM that
does those things as well is just wasting money.

Looking at a Polar F6 (rrp $249). Are there dodgy brands to look out
for? Reasonable $$ to spend?

Cheers

Brendo
 
B

Brendo

Guest
Also, does the chest strap have a size limit? Occasionally I have some
issues with things that wrap around my torso.

Hence the HRM. I need to shed additional luggage.

Brendo
 
B

Bleve

Guest
On Jul 16, 1:44 pm, Brendo <[email protected]> wrote:
> When buying a HRM do you look for a bicycle HRM (that does speed,
> cadence, etc) or would you rather have two devices, one for bike info,
> one for HR info?


I have both, as I move HRM's and power meters around, but want to know
total distance each bike has been ridden (and I have lots of bikes),
and it's easy to have both. But my case isn't the usual one.

The short answer is it depends. Do you want to be able to upload to
computer and track your mileage etc? If so, an integrated unit like
the Polar S520 or higher, or the CS200 (or whatever one it is that has
upload and bike functions?). If you just want to know your HR to
meter your efforts, then I'd suggest having a cheap HRM on your bars
that you can also take off and use for other activities (XC ski-ing!
there's 10cm at TBJ! w00t!) and a computer on your bike for time/speed/
distance etc.


>
> I already have the bike computer, so I figure that buying a HRM that
> does those things as well is just wasting money.
>
> Looking at a Polar F6 (rrp $249). Are there dodgy brands to look out
> for? Reasonable $$ to spend?


Polar stuff has been, in my experience, pretty reliable. The straps
are quite adjustable too so it's unlikely that you can't get them to
fit unless you have a very small chest.
 
O

OzCableguy

Guest
"Brendo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Also, does the chest strap have a size limit? Occasionally I have some
> issues with things that wrap around my torso.
>
> Hence the HRM. I need to shed additional luggage.
>
>


Well I bought an Echo F2 bike computer for around $50.00 and a Oregon
Scientific HR318 Heart Rate monitor from $130.00 recently. $180.00 all up,
both fit on my handlebars easily and I can also strap the HRM to my wrist
for running or whatever as well and easily transfer it between bikes.
I'm 130 cm around the chest and the chest strap fits easily. I have to
tighten it up a fair bit actually.

For an all in one you'd need something like the Polar CS200cad at around
$300.00. It does more stuff like "Polar OwnCode®" to prevent interference
from other heart rate monitors. Great if you're riding with others using
HRMs that might be on the same frequency. I decided against this one because
I was a bit irked that it had to go back to Polar for a battery change
instead of the local jeweller or Mr Minute, and I like being able to use it
on different bikes easily.

Eventually I'll probably lash out on a Garmin GPS with HRM built-in and the
ability to upload routes and training data to http://www.motionbased.com/

See also my "Which HRM" thread last month - http://tinyurl.com/ynmdn8


--
www.ozcableguy.com
www.oztechnologies.com
 
B

Brendo

Guest

> The short answer is it depends. Do you want to be able to upload to
> computer and track your mileage etc? If so, an integrated unit like
> the Polar S520 or higher, or the CS200 (or whatever one it is that has
> upload and bike functions?). If you just want to know your HR to
> meter your efforts, then I'd suggest having a cheap HRM on your bars
> that you can also take off and use for other activities (XC ski-ing!
> there's 10cm at TBJ! w00t!) and a computer on your bike for time/speed/
> distance etc.


I do try to track my efforts, but I don't want to pay for it when I
can just note my km's speed etc and then whack it into a spreadsheet.


> Polar stuff has been, in my experience, pretty reliable. The straps
> are quite adjustable too so it's unlikely that you can't get them to
> fit unless you have a very small chest.


But the more I look into it, $249 is a lot of clams for a 'simple'
HRM. I figure I need to monitor 1) heart rate, 2) target zones 3) time
in those zones & 4) audible alarm when out of those zones.

Is there anything else that will be useful in this early stage of "The
Great Getting Fit Campaign'?

Brendo
 

Rory Williams

New Member
Sep 3, 2003
144
0
16
Brendo said:

> Polar stuff has been, in my experience, pretty reliable. The straps
> are quite adjustable too so it's unlikely that you can't get them to
> fit unless you have a very small chest.


But the more I look into it, $249 is a lot of clams for a 'simple'
HRM. I figure I need to monitor 1) heart rate, 2) target zones 3) time
in those zones & 4) audible alarm when out of those zones.

Is there anything else that will be useful in this early stage of "The
Great Getting Fit Campaign'?

Brendo

In relative terms $249 is pretty good compared to what it used to be. I have a polar unit that has about those functions that cost me about that much, but in 1988. I used it a lot for the first five years or so but only occasionally since. most of the rubbery bits have perished but the electronics are still working. In those days the chest units were user-servicable so it as a few dollars doe a battery every now and then.

So I would certainly certainly reccomend Polar, although their non-servicability of the chest units is a bit of a discouragement.

RoryW
 

MikeyOz

New Member
Aug 12, 2003
942
0
0
52
OzCableguy said:
I was a bit irked that it had to go back to Polar for a battery change
instead of the local jeweller or Mr Minute, and I like being able to use it
on different bikes easily.

I would not let that go against a polar, I have sent numerous items to pursuit performance and they are excellent, I actually like sending stuff to them, I know it will be fixed and come back within a couple of days.

I would recommend the polar, I have eventually worked my way to a CS200 and it is great, love the large display, I use my old orginal 520 that I got quite a few years back for running and anything else.
 
D

Donga

Guest
On Jul 16, 3:12 pm, Brendo <[email protected]> wrote:
> > The short answer is it depends. Do you want to be able to upload to
> > computer and track your mileage etc? If so, an integrated unit like
> > the Polar S520 or higher, or the CS200 (or whatever one it is that has
> > upload and bike functions?). If you just want to know your HR to
> > meter your efforts, then I'd suggest having a cheap HRM on your bars
> > that you can also take off and use for other activities (XC ski-ing!
> > there's 10cm at TBJ! w00t!) and a computer on your bike for time/speed/
> > distance etc.

>
> I do try to track my efforts, but I don't want to pay for it when I
> can just note my km's speed etc and then whack it into a spreadsheet.
>
> > Polar stuff has been, in my experience, pretty reliable. The straps
> > are quite adjustable too so it's unlikely that you can't get them to
> > fit unless you have a very small chest.

>
> But the more I look into it, $249 is a lot of clams for a 'simple'
> HRM. I figure I need to monitor 1) heart rate, 2) target zones 3) time
> in those zones & 4) audible alarm when out of those zones.
>
> Is there anything else that will be useful in this early stage of "The
> Great Getting Fit Campaign'?
>
> Brendo


I recently got a Polar CS100 - decided on it over the CS200 on
experience that I never stick with good intentions to download, plot
and monitor detailed data. The CS100 is a nice unit that does the
things you have specified. I got it at a good price from a UK shop. As
a previous Polar owner, I agree with MikeyOz's comment on Pursuit
Performance being good operators who overcome any "issues" with
servicability.

Donga
 
B

Bleve

Guest
On Jul 16, 3:58 pm, Rory Williams <[email protected]
mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote:
> Brendo Wrote:
>
>
>
> > > Polar stuff has been, in my experience, pretty reliable. The straps
> > > are quite adjustable too so it's unlikely that you can't get them to
> > > fit unless you have a very small chest.

>
> > But the more I look into it, $249 is a lot of clams for a 'simple'
> > HRM. I figure I need to monitor 1) heart rate, 2) target zones 3) time
> > in those zones & 4) audible alarm when out of those zones.

>
> > Is there anything else that will be useful in this early stage of "The
> > Great Getting Fit Campaign'?

>
> > Brendo

>
> In relative terms $249 is pretty good compared to what it used to be.
> I have a polar unit that has about those functions that cost me about
> that much, but in 1988. I used it a lot for the first five years or so
> but only occasionally since. most of the rubbery bits have perished but
> the electronics are still working. In those days the chest units were
> user-servicable so it as a few dollars doe a battery every now and
> then.
>
> So I would certainly certainly reccomend Polar, although their
> non-servicability of the chest units is a bit of a discouragement.


If this is an issue, the 'wearlink' band is user-servicable, and the
new 2.4GHz band is too - it's the same band as used by Garmin,
PowerTap etc. A standard by stealth ... heh
 
B

Brendo

Guest
>
> I recently got a Polar CS100 - decided on it over the CS200 on
> experience that I never stick with good intentions to download, plot
> and monitor detailed data. The CS100 is a nice unit that does the
> things you have specified. I got it at a good price from a UK shop. As
> a previous Polar owner, I agree with MikeyOz's comment on Pursuit
> Performance being good operators who overcome any "issues" with
> servicability.
>
> Donga- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


I had a look on eBay. There are CS200cad units for less that $250 (and
that includes shipping). This would cover all bases, but mean I have
to assign yet another bike computer to the To Be Used Later bag.

But if I get one of these, how long till I yearn for a GPS,
thermometer and built in "frikkin' laser beam".

Brendo
 

MikeyOz

New Member
Aug 12, 2003
942
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0
52
Brendo said:
But if I get one of these, how long till I yearn for a GPS,
thermometer and built in "frikkin' laser beam".
Brendo

I guess is a matter of what do you really need ?? I mean what in hell do you need a GPS for ?? I could understand it if you plan on go adventuring or something out in the stix, which would be kind of cool, get from a to b with a GPS.

I know a couple of people that have them, they seem pretty happy with them, but you would want to be for the money. I think they did complain about the user interface being a bit muddled, something the polars' do not suffer from.
 
D

Donga

Guest
On Jul 16, 5:34 pm, MikeyOz <[email protected]
mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote:
> Brendo Wrote:
>
> > But if I get one of these, how long till I yearn for a GPS,
> > thermometer and built in "frikkin' laser beam".
> > Brendo

>
> I guess is a matter of what do you really need ?? I mean what in hell
> do you need a GPS for ?? I could understand it if you plan on go
> adventuring or something out in the stix, which would be kind of cool,
> get from a to b with a GPS.
>
> I know a couple of people that have them, they seem pretty happy with
> them, but you would want to be for the money. I think they did
> complain about the user interface being a bit muddled, something the
> polars' do not suffer from.
>
> --
> MikeyOz


It has been funny at the cafe asking a couple of GPS owners where they
rode today. They give the same response as before.

Donga
 
B

Brendo

Guest

> I guess is a matter of what do you really need ??


Does that apply with all cycling related items? <tongue in cheek>

I agree, a gps would be lost on me, but you always hanker for more...

Brendo
 
M

Michael Warner

Guest
On Mon, 16 Jul 2007 00:47:03 -0700, Donga wrote:

> It has been funny at the cafe asking a couple of GPS owners where they
> rode today. They give the same response as before.


I get pretty tired of gadget freaks going on and on about the wonderful
features of their latest HRM or GPS toy. None of them seem to make it
any harder to drop their proud owners week after week; they have to work
such long hours to pay for their toys that they don't ride enough to get
any faster or stronger. At least with new poseur bikes, once you've admired
them for a couple of minutes you can usually change the subject without
any trouble :)

I bought a cheap no-name HRM once, used it for a while, and soon got
so familiar with my HR that I could guess it pretty accurately without
checking the monitor, so I no longer bother with it.
 

The Double Zero

New Member
Apr 15, 2005
178
0
0
Brendo said:
When buying a HRM do you look for a bicycle HRM (that does speed,
cadence, etc) or would you rather have two devices, one for bike info,
one for HR info?

I already have the bike computer, so I figure that buying a HRM that
does those things as well is just wasting money.

Looking at a Polar F6 (rrp $249). Are there dodgy brands to look out
for? Reasonable $$ to spend?

Cheers

Brendo
I prefer to have the two devices, just because then I can use the HRM for activites other than cycling, like gym work or running.
 

MikeyOz

New Member
Aug 12, 2003
942
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0
52
Brendo said:
Does that apply with all cycling related items? <tongue in cheek>
Brendo

sh&t yeah! it all makes me a better person! :)

Actually I can't say much, I just bought a new pair of shoes..... I had to, I asked my wife if I could buy these new shoes and she said "yes ok"..... I was down there in a flash! Comfort has new meaning, compared to what I had previously been using, but given the amount of kms I do, I don't have an issue.... sooooooo comfy.
 
B

Bleve

Guest
On Jul 16, 5:34 pm, MikeyOz <[email protected]
mx.forums.cyclingforums.com> wrote:
> Brendo Wrote:
>
> > But if I get one of these, how long till I yearn for a GPS,
> > thermometer and built in "frikkin' laser beam".
> > Brendo

>
> I guess is a matter of what do you really need ?? I mean what in hell
> do you need a GPS for ?? I could understand it if you plan on go
> adventuring or something out in the stix, which would be kind of cool,
> get from a to b with a GPS


If you like to keep detailed logs/diary, the garmins rock. And
they're pretty good for trackies too - they (outdoor...) can count
your laps.


> I know a couple of people that have them, they seem pretty happy with
> them, but you would want to be for the money. I think they did
> complain about the user interface being a bit muddled, something the
> polars' do not suffer from.
>
> --
> MikeyOz
 
B

Brendo

Guest

>
> > I guess is a matter of what do you really need ?? I mean what in hell
> > do you need a GPS for ?? I could understand it if you plan on go
> > adventuring or something out in the stix, which would be kind of cool,
> > get from a to b with a GPS


Looking at the Garmin 205, the GPS would make for a fun device. You
can save your times over a circuit, or train against a 'ghost' rider.
So in that regard, maybe GPS would be good. Using it as a geographical
device would be less good (for want of better English).

> If you like to keep detailed logs/diary, the garmins rock. And
> they're pretty good for trackies too - they (outdoor...) can count
> your laps.


And looking on eBay, I can get a Garmin 205 from the UK or US for less
than the RRP of the Polar F6.

Mmmm....ebay.

Brendo
 
B

Brendo

Guest

> > I guess is a matter of what do you really need ?? I mean what in hell
> > do you need a GPS for ?? I could understand it if you plan on go
> > adventuring or something out in the stix, which would be kind of cool,
> > get from a to b with a GPS


> If you like to keep detailed logs/diary, the garmins rock. And
> they're pretty good for trackies too - they (outdoor...) can count
> your laps.


I just looked at the Garmin Edge 205. The GPS in this is used to
compare times on a circuit i.e. at point A you were 2 seconds faster,
at point B you were 4 seconds faster, at end you were 1 second
faster). This is where it would be useful. As a navigational or
geographical tool, not much help. You do little exploring on a road
bike. After all, there are roads. And the roads are on maps.

But some of the other things would be ... interesting. I guess it's a
case of how much information do you want? Do you need them? Probably
no. But then you don't need newsgroups either, but the info in them is
interesting (except some rants from the odd loon now and then).

I can find a Garmin Edge 205 on eBay for less that the RRP of the
Polar F6. It comes from the US or UK, but for the price of the goods
and an Australian A/C adapter, I'm still in front.

Mmmmm ... eBay.

Brendo
 

MikeyOz

New Member
Aug 12, 2003
942
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0
52
Brendo said:
I can find a Garmin Edge 205 on eBay for less that the RRP of the
Polar F6. It comes from the US or UK, but for the price of the goods
and an Australian A/C adapter, I'm still in front.

Mmmmm ... eBay.

Brendo

I assume you will probably be ok, but just check that if you purchase it from overseas the warrarnty is still valid in Australia, I know the Polar stuff is, not sure about Garmin stuff.