Heart rate zones

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by Leon, Nov 29, 2003.

  1. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    I've started training indoors because of the lack of opportunity to get outdoor sessions through work commitments.
    Since commencing indoor sessions, I've noticed that I'm sweating profusely during/after each session.
    Each session lasts one hour and I alternate between gearing
    42/11 and 53/9 at 85-95 rpms.
    Has anyone had the same problem ?
    If so is there a solution ?
     


  2. JuneBug

    JuneBug New Member

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    Since commencing indoor sessions, I've noticed that I'm sweating profusely during/after each session.


    LOL try a fan?? in your face kinda thing. its pretty normal to sweat like a fire hose. get a cheapo fan from the hardware store. :) and a cheapie tarp so you dont ruin your floor. oh and a protector on your bike if its metal or aluminum cause sweat is VERY caustical
     
  3. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    JujneBug,

    Thanks for the suggestions !
    What is worrying me is why I'm sweating so much ?
    (I'm reasonably fit - train regularly - just seem to sweat a lot when training indoors !)
     
  4. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    It's perfectly normal to sweat when exercising. In fact you sweat at *higher* rates the fitter you are. Sweating is a mechanism to keep cool, as the sweat evaporates off your skin it cools you down. if the sweating is dripping (which it frequently does at high intensity and/or indoors) it doesn't aid cooling.

    Sweat rates, as well as being fitness related are also genetic, gender and temperature and humidity dependent. they're also different at altitude as well

    ric
     
  5. JuneBug

    JuneBug New Member

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    What is worrying me is why I'm sweating so much ?


    I used to teach indoor cycling and was amazed at the amount of sweat SOME people would be covered in..hair, jersey, socks even their shoes! Everything SOAKED from one hour and the floor covered as well. SOme folks would have big awful puddles under them. I was told to weigh myself before and after a workout to see if I was taking in enough fluids. I wonder if that would help you at all? it would be fun and interesting to see just how much water weight you sweat !!! :)
     
  6. JuneBug

    JuneBug New Member

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    [. they're also different at altitude as well

    ric [/B][/QUOTE]

    that is interesting. I always wanted a hypoxic trainer... not to get faster but just to get sedated on .
    (ok KIDDING! ~just kidding)
    how does altitude change the sweat? I had this funny image of it turning into little gravity balls like you see in outerspace.
    ..... is that why they tell us to really really drink water and take a ginko pill whenever we go to some mountain area ? its interesting! ((seriously)) I guess if I took a spin class in Denver colorado and weighed myself before and after I could see the difference.......

    oh man I sound like a geek.. never mind. LOL . I guess its good to just know that we need to drink more water.

    chicago GrrrrrL btw. i think we is at 100 feet here. haha
     
  7. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    that is interesting. I always wanted a hypoxic trainer... not to get faster but just to get sedated on .
    (ok KIDDING! ~just kidding)
    how does altitude change the sweat?
    [/quote]

    it doesn't change it per se, just the rate of sweating


    aren't there some hilly bits in chicago? i'll see if i can see any friday

    ric
     
  8. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    Thanks Junebug and Ricstern : for your collective advice.
    I'll just monitor it and see how it goes.
    Hopefully, as I get used to more indoor sessions it might improve !
     
  9. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    Assuming you're talking about sweat rates, it won't improve. you'll sweat more as you get fitter. elite (male) athletes sweat ~ 2 litres per hour and upwards (think i've seen date for ~ 3.5 L/hr)

    ric
     
  10. warren

    warren New Member

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    i just dont get it. Im 32 years old, 80kg(app 177 pounds) and 1.76 m (app 5foot9). I ride every day. I consider myself reasonably fit. i.e i generally am able to completea tough 100kms race in under 3 hours.

    My max hr on my polar todate is 174 bpm - and then my heart has almost popped right out of my chest......what the hell is wrong with me?
     
  11. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    nothing is wrong with you, what makes you think your HRmax should be higher?

    two points
    1) it requires extreme motivation to reach max -- it's not something you can do easily. in 20 years of racing i've only ever reached my max in about 5 races

    2) HRmax is very individual, such that the regression equation 220-age = hrmax, can have a standard deviation of 15 b/min...

    ric
     
  12. edd

    edd New Member

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  13. Crosser

    Crosser New Member

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    Try the heart calc at www.machinehead-software.co.uk. Most calculators are for basic info, exact numbers need to come from an exercise physiology lab, knowing the zones and yourself can prevent a heart attack, it did for me. Get a guide to heart-rate training, record yours regularly, the heart adapts to training, your numbers will change with age and fitness level. When the numbers and PE (perceived exertion) don't match, call your doctor. Right then, not later!
     
  14. Randybaker99

    Randybaker99 New Member

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    Me too. I am 41 and just started using an HRM a couple months ago (and only on a trainer, so far). I started adjusting the automatic zone settings upwards 20 BPM (by telling it that I am 21 years old) and that seems to be a more accurate range for me. The maximum HR that I have measured so far is 190, but I haven't really pulled out the stops yet, the way I might on a team ride, chasing faster riders up a long hill!
     
  15. Randybaker99

    Randybaker99 New Member

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    Yep. I fixed it with a Big Old Fan blowing into the bike - call it simulated headwind.

    Food for thought: are you drinking a lot more water on your indoor sessions, or feeling more dehydrated than when you are outdoors? Probably not, my guess is that the sweat is evaporating quickly outdoors and you don't notice it as much. Enter the Big Old Fan.
     
  16. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    Randybiker,
    Yes I agree, I think that when one is outdoors, sweat tends to evaporate.
    It's just damned uncomfortable doing the indoor sessions though.
    (restricted time due to career, family commitments mean that I have no choice but to do indoor sessions).
    The big old fan is the only option, I'm afraid.
     
  17. Paul J

    Paul J New Member

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    >Yes I agree, I think that when one is outdoors, sweat tends to >evaporate.

    When you're outside on the road you've got a 30-40km/hr wind "cooling" you down by blowing off the sweat. Try finding a fan that can simulate that.

    >It's just damned uncomfortable doing the indoor sessions though.

    Depends if you like bumpy roads and stop/start traffic and breathing in exhaust fumes. Pros and cons both ways. I think the outside can toughen you up. But inside you can get a more consistent workout.
     
  18. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    Paul J
    Yes, I much prefer the outdoor training and used to train each year during the winter outdoors only.
    But this year, I've had to compromise : it's tough going !
     
  19. bryanquinn

    bryanquinn New Member

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    I don't know if anyone else would agree with this, but after being off of my bike for about two years I waited until I had been biking for about a month before I measured my max heart rate. I wanted to make sure I had some kind of base fitness before I pushed myself that hard. It just seemed to make sense to me. I'm a 44 year old male and am pleased to report that the max HR I reached recently was 195. I rode for about 30min. before testing this. (For the warm up). Then increased my workout load by 10% every two minutes until I could do no more. I realized this when I almost coughed up my lungs and my legs felt like concreate and would move no more. LOL It's kind of a scary feeling when you reach that point. I would like to have vo2max tested but have yet to find a place to do it. Any way good luck to the starter of this post in finding your max HR. Make sure your well rested and haven't had anything to eat for at least an hour and a half before the test. BQ
     
  20. edd

    edd New Member

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    If you are training hard and improving, which you would if you have been off the bike for a while, I'd do a reassessment of MHR every 3 months, it will go up or down as you improve.
     
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