Heart Rate

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Dougielas, Mar 10, 2004.

  1. Dougielas

    Dougielas Guest

    I am a cyclist and note that my heart rate climbs to my max
    very quick into my ride. I am 47 with a chart max of 176 bps
    and I cycle about 30 to 40 miles 2 or 3 times a week. I
    consider myself in shape but do get winded. I usually hit my
    max or at least 90% after a couple miles. My recovery is
    good after a short session but after a long ride, it will
    recovery from about 170 to 120 within a min or two but will
    remain ~100 bps a couple hrs after the ride. My resting
    pulse is about 58. I don't consider it normal and it is
    abnormal compared to everyone in our riding group. I
    mentioned it to the family dr but he said as long as I was
    asymptomatic, not to worry. But I still do. Any feedback
    would be appreciated. Thanks, Doug
     
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  2. Doug,

    You may not be as fit as the other riders. Your recovery
    pulse is good, and you are in good shape. Your resting
    pulse is good but not excellent. I'd place you in the
    "worried well" category unless you have other risk factors.
    Just my opinion.

    [email protected] (Dougielas) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am a cyclist and note that my heart rate climbs to my
    > max very quick into my ride. I am 47 with a chart max of
    > 176 bps and I cycle about 30 to 40 miles 2 or 3 times a
    > week. I consider myself in shape but do get winded. I
    > usually hit my max or at least 90% after a couple miles.
    > My recovery is good after a short session but after a long
    > ride, it will recovery from about 170 to 120 within a min
    > or two but will remain ~100 bps a couple hrs after the
    > ride. My resting pulse is about 58. I don't consider it
    > normal and it is abnormal compared to everyone in our
    > riding group. I mentioned it to the family dr but he said
    > as long as I was asymptomatic, not to worry. But I still
    > do. Any feedback would be appreciated. Thanks, Doug
     
  3. Dougielas wrote:

    > I am a cyclist and note that my heart rate climbs to my
    > max very quick into my ride. I am 47 with a chart max of
    > 176 bps and I cycle about 30 to 40 miles 2 or 3 times a
    > week. I consider myself in shape but do get winded. I
    > usually hit my max or at least 90% after a couple miles.
    > My recovery is good after a short session but after a long
    > ride, it will recovery from about 170 to 120 within a min
    > or two but will remain ~100 bps a couple hrs after the
    > ride. My resting pulse is about 58. I don't consider it
    > normal and it is abnormal compared to everyone in our
    > riding group. I mentioned it to the family dr but he said
    > as long as I was asymptomatic, not to worry. But I still
    > do. Any feedback would be appreciated. Thanks, Doug

    Would suggest you ask your family doctor for a referral to
    consult with a cardiologist. Persistently elevated heart
    rate (greater than 100 bpm) for more than 5 minutes after
    cessation of exercise is not normal.

    Servant to the humblest person in the universe,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    **
    Who is the humblest person in the universe?
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    What is all this about?
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    Is this spam?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?N69721867
     
  4. Don Kirkman

    Don Kirkman Guest

    It seems to me I heard somewhere that Dougielas wrote in article
    <[email protected]>:

    >I am a cyclist and note that my heart rate climbs to my max
    >very quick into my ride. I am 47 with a chart max of 176
    >bps and I cycle about 30 to 40 miles 2 or 3 times a week. I
    >consider myself in shape but do get winded. I usually hit
    >my max or at least 90% after a couple miles. My recovery is
    >good after a short session but after a long ride, it will
    >recovery from about 170 to 120 within a min or two but will
    >remain ~100 bps a couple hrs after the ride. My resting
    >pulse is about 58. I don't consider it normal and it is
    >abnormal compared to everyone in our riding group. I
    >mentioned it to the family dr but he said as long as I was
    >asymptomatic, not to worry. But I still do. Any feedback
    >would be appreciated. Thanks, Doug

    For comparison, I'm 75 and my MHR measured on bicycles and
    treadmills over a period of about 15 years was somewhere
    around 165. I need to run one or two miles before my heart
    rate stabilizes. My period of slight breathlessness ends
    after about half a mile, but the heart rate rises gradually
    until the warm up is complete. Any similar pattern is
    probably normal.

    Your recovery seems within rule of thumb limits, which for
    endurance runners is to get back to 100~120 bpm within two
    or three minutes of cessation of exercise. I would guess the
    same rule of thumb would apply to cyclists, since both are
    doing primarily aerobic exercise.

    Endurance runners may have elevated pulse rates for an
    extended time after a strenuous effort such as a
    marathon; I've never timed my recovery following a
    marathon, but it was certainly longer than a few
    minutes.. I see no reason the same shouldn't be true for
    cyclists; 100bpm is not unusually high for some time
    immediately after a hard session.

    Resting pulse is quite individual, though skimming Google
    hits suggests many well-trained elite endurance athletes
    bottom out in the 30s or 40s. I don't think you should
    compare your own readings to those of others--each of us is
    an experiment of one and the goal is to determine what is
    normal for you, not for a statistical population. OTOH, if
    your resting rate is rising by several beats that can be a
    symptom of overtraining.

    How long have you been cycling at this intensity? Endurance
    sports are long-term endeavors; if you have changed or are
    changing the intensity of your workouts you should see
    equivalent changes over time in both resting rates and rates
    at given levels of exertion.

    Not being a medical person, I can't guess whether the
    pattern you describe is appropriate for you, but it doesn't
    seem unusual to me. If you have concerns try to go into it
    in more depth with your doctor or look for a second opinion.
    I suspect the results will be reassuring.
    --
    Don [email protected]
     
  5. Don Kirkman

    Don Kirkman Guest

    It seems to me I heard somewhere that Dougielas wrote in article
    <[email protected]>:

    >I am a cyclist and note that my heart rate climbs to my max
    >very quick into my ride. I am 47 with a chart max of 176
    >bps and I cycle about 30 to 40 miles 2 or 3 times a week. I
    >consider myself in shape but do get winded. I usually hit
    >my max or at least 90% after a couple miles. My recovery is
    >good after a short session but after a long ride, it will
    >recovery from about 170 to 120 within a min or two but will
    >remain ~100 bps a couple hrs after the ride. My resting
    >pulse is about 58. I don't consider it normal and it is
    >abnormal compared to everyone in our riding group. I
    >mentioned it to the family dr but he said as long as I was
    >asymptomatic, not to worry. But I still do. Any feedback
    >would be appreciated. Thanks, Doug

    For comparison, I'm 75 and my MHR measured on bicycles and
    treadmills over a period of about 15 years was somewhere
    around 165. I need to run one or two miles before my heart
    rate stabilizes. My period of slight breathlessness ends
    after about half a mile, but the heart rate rises gradually
    until the warm up is complete. Any similar pattern is
    probably normal.

    Your recovery seems within rule of thumb limits, which for
    endurance runners is to get back to 100~120 bpm within two
    or three minutes of cessation of exercise. I would guess the
    same rule of thumb would apply to cyclists, since both are
    doing primarily aerobic exercise.

    Endurance runners may have elevated pulse rates for an
    extended time after a strenuous effort such as a
    marathon; I've never timed my recovery following a
    marathon, but it was certainly longer than a few
    minutes.. I see no reason the same shouldn't be true for
    cyclists; 100bpm is not unusually high for some time
    immediately after a hard session.

    Resting pulse is quite individual, though skimming Google
    hits suggests many well-trained elite endurance athletes
    bottom out in the 30s or 40s. I don't think you should
    compare your own readings to those of others--each of us is
    an experiment of one and the goal is to determine what is
    normal for you, not for a statistical population. OTOH, if
    your resting rate is rising by several beats that can be a
    symptom of overtraining.

    How long have you been cycling at this intensity? Endurance
    sports are long-term endeavors; if you have changed or are
    changing the intensity of your workouts you should see
    equivalent changes over time in both resting rates and rates
    at given levels of exertion.

    Not being a medical person, I can't guess whether the
    pattern you describe is appropriate for you, but it doesn't
    seem unusual to me. If you have concerns try to go into it
    in more depth with your doctor or look for a second opinion.
    I suspect the results will be reassuring.
    --
    Don [email protected]
     
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