heartrate question

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Bob Banfield, Mar 9, 2003.

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  1. Bob Banfield

    Bob Banfield Guest

    Hi All Could someone explain what's going here? Assuming equal conditions: Sometimes I can ride at
    160 bpm (around 85% of my max )and breath easily with fairly moderate percieved effort. Other times
    I'm struggling to breath at the same heartrate and the percieved effort is much higher. cheers

    Bob
     
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  2. Niv

    Niv Guest

    Are you sure you're fully recovered? Try measuring your resting heart rate before each exercise.
    Elevated - give it a miss. Niv. "Bob Banfield" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi All Could someone explain what's going here? Assuming equal conditions: Sometimes I can ride at
    > 160 bpm (around 85% of my max )and breath easily with fairly moderate percieved effort. Other
    > times I'm struggling to breath at the same heartrate and the
    percieved
    > effort is much higher. cheers
    >
    > Bob
     
  3. Thus spake "Niv" <[email protected]>

    > Are you sure you're fully recovered? Try measuring your resting heart rate before each exercise.
    > Elevated - give it a miss. Niv. "Bob Banfield" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Hi All Could someone explain what's going here? Assuming equal conditions: Sometimes I can ride
    > > at 160 bpm (around 85% of my max )and breath easily with fairly moderate percieved effort. Other
    > > times I'm struggling to breath at the same heartrate and the
    > percieved
    > > effort is much higher. cheers

    The other thing that might occur is that your glycogen supplies might be low. *Everything*
    seems harder when this is the case. Make sure you carbohydrate intake is high, especially after
    a hard ride.

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
  4. Rory

    Rory Guest

    "Bob Banfield" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi All Could someone explain what's going here? Assuming equal conditions: Sometimes I can ride
    > at 160 bpm (around 85% of my max )and breath easily with fairly moderate percieved effort.
    > Other times I'm struggling to breath at the same heartrate and the percieved effort is much
    > higher. cheers
    I think its genrally agreed that heartrate isn't all that counts toward how hard you are working
    (although it's a great training aid). I ride up and down one hill, hitting about 82% mhr both on
    the way up and the way down, but going up always feels harder. I guess that having to dispose of
    the lactic acid weights the feeling of exertion (I strive for the same cadence up hill and down,
    but fail...)
     
  5. Andymorris

    Andymorris Guest

    Helen Deborah Vecht wrote:
    >> Niv. "Bob Banfield" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]...
    >>> Hi All Could someone explain what's going here? Assuming equal conditions: Sometimes I can ride
    >>> at 160 bpm (around 85% of my max )and breath easily with fairly moderate percieved effort. Other
    >>> times I'm struggling to breath at the same heartrate and the percieved effort is much higher.
    >>> cheers
    >
    > The other thing that might occur is that your glycogen supplies might be low. *Everything*
    > seems harder when this is the case. Make sure you carbohydrate intake is high, especially after
    > a hard ride.

    Hi Helli

    How does that work for us porky boys?

    After riding I am always famished (but then I am a greedy boy). If resist the urge to stuff my face
    will my body start using my ample tum?

    I usually start feeling a bit 'bonkish after about 1 1/2 hours of riding. Should a snack a bit
    before this or press on to burn more fat?

    I am not very fit having returned to cycling from a 10 year layoff 6 months ago. When I used to blat
    around on a fixie I weighed around 12 1/2 stone and am now 5 stone heavier.

    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

    Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
  6. Thus spake "AndyMorris" <[email protected]>

    > Helen Deborah Vecht wrote:
    > >> Niv. "Bob Banfield" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> news:[email protected]...
    > >>> Hi All

    > Hi Helli

    > How does that work for us porky boys?

    > After riding I am always famished (but then I am a greedy boy). If resist the urge to stuff my
    > face will my body start using my ample tum?

    Having tried (and failed) the dieting lark whilst cycling, I can confirm it did not work for me. It
    seems to work rather better for boys with a highish aerobic capacity and more abdominal fat though.

    Trying to cycle fairly slowly might help also.

    > I usually start feeling a bit 'bonkish after about 1 1/2 hours of riding. Should a snack a bit
    > before this or press on to burn more fat?

    It depends whether you are trying to become a faster fitter cyclist or less of a lardball! I used to
    get *really* hungry midweek after doing weekend Audax rides.

    > I am not very fit having returned to cycling from a 10 year layoff 6 months ago. When I used to
    > blat around on a fixie I weighed around 12 1/2 stone and am now 5 stone heavier.

    I am the same 11 stone as I was in 1985 (and 1978). I have fluctuated by about +/- a stone since. I
    gained a stone when I did a lot of Audax rides (this was *not* muscle!) I suspect I was so scared of
    the bonk that I stuffed myself with carbs. I've not ridden a bicycle at all for 2 years. i covered
    >11,000 miles cycling in 1994 & 1995. I lost weight in 1996 when I reduced my cycling mileage as my
    appetite dropped. I don't eat much now.

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
  7. Rory

    Rory Guest

    "AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Helen Deborah Vecht wrote:
    > >> Niv. "Bob Banfield" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> news:[email protected]...
    > >>> Hi All Could someone explain what's going here? Assuming equal conditions: Sometimes I can
    > >>> ride at 160 bpm (around 85% of my max )and breath easily with fairly moderate percieved
    > >>> effort. Other times I'm struggling to breath at the same heartrate and the percieved effort is
    > >>> much higher. cheers
    > >
    > > The other thing that might occur is that your glycogen supplies might be low. *Everything*
    > > seems harder when this is the case. Make sure you carbohydrate intake is high, especially after
    > > a hard ride.
    >
    > Hi Helli
    >
    > How does that work for us porky boys?
    >
    > After riding I am always famished (but then I am a greedy boy). If resist the urge to stuff my
    > face will my body start using my ample tum?

    I dunno if this will work for you, but it did for me (shed 5 stone in 18mths): I don't eat before a
    ride, but drink a couple of strong espressos, and a small square of chocolate. Apparently, the
    caffeine stimulates fat release, and the sugar is needed to get the muscles started burning it
    (krebs cycle or summit). I don't get hungry or run out of energy for at least two hours, after which
    a couple of glucose tabs fixes me. The only problem is, on a non-cycling day I eat like a pig: I
    guess that the body gets used to the fat as an energy source, and complains when it doesn't arrive.
     
  8. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I usually start feeling a bit 'bonkish after about 1 1/2 hours of riding. Should a snack a bit
    > before this or press on to burn more fat?

    If you genuinely feel "bonkish" I don't see how you'll be able to carry on for much longer before
    full blown bonk hits you, and then you'll be sorry! Eat before 1 1/2 hours and drink plenty,
    speshully as it warms up, hic.

    Pete
     
  9. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Peter B" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > I usually start feeling a bit 'bonkish after about 1 1/2 hours of
    riding.
    > > Should a snack a bit before this or press on to burn more fat?
    >
    > If you genuinely feel "bonkish" I don't see how you'll be able to carry on for much longer before
    > full blown bonk hits you, and then you'll be sorry! Eat before 1 1/2 hours and drink plenty,
    > speshully as it warms up, hic.
    >
    > Pete
    >
    >
    Sorry to interrupt flow but... I'm planning on doing John O' Groats to Lands End next week with
    minimum planning (foolish man!). I'm keeping everything to an absolute minimum and hoping to achieve
    around 100 miles per day for upto 10 days. I have been doing a lot of stamina training over the last
    few months with a minimum of 1 ride of around 50-70 miles, 1 run of 12 miles and upto 3 x 1 mile
    swims per week and 1 session of 4 hours rockface climbing. Regards diet, I just try to eat fairly
    healthily but don't go mad on fad type diets. My plans for the ride, as a skeleton to build on for
    each day will be to start off with an Alpen bar, then find a roadside cafe (little chef;-) for a big
    fry-up type breakfast, then hit a fish & chip shop at the end of the day. I'll try and get some
    fruit during the course of the day. I'll also have a 2 litre water back pack on, being used and
    filled as needed. In reserve I'll have a couple of rowntrees jellies and a pack of glucose tablets
    should things get really desperate. Is this a reasonable approach, given that the rest of the plans
    are totally unreasonable, or is it a serious risk to my wellbeing ? - As much as I want this to be a
    'once in a lifetime' experience, I am a happily married father of three, so I don't want it to be
    the *last* experience of my life....;-) Cheers, Dave (6 days 'n' countin')
     
  10. Thus spake "Dave" <[email protected]>

    > I'm planning on doing John O' Groats to Lands End next week with minimum planning (foolish man!).

    Good Luck! You *can* do it!

    > My plans for the ride, as a skeleton to build on for each day will be to start off with an Alpen
    > bar, then find a roadside cafe (little chef;-) for a big fry-up type breakfast, then hit a fish &
    > chip shop at the end of the day. I'll try and get some fruit during the course of the day.

    This combination sounds like far too little carbohydrate and too much fat for my liking. Some people
    run quite well on fat though. Little Chef portions are not that big (My friend's cathphrase is
    "Starve to death at a Li**** C*** !") and 100 miles per day needs around 3,000 *extra* kCal per day.
    (You probably need 2,000 kCal per day just breathing in front of a computer.) You will have to get
    these Calories somewhere and a family-sized slab of cake from a supermarket or village shop will
    help. Be guided by what you fancy. If you crave for something, go for it. Tinned rice pudding can be
    just the ticket, for some. make sure you have a tin opener!

    > I'll also have a 2 litre water back pack on, being used and filled as needed. In reserve I'll have
    > a couple of rowntrees jellies and a pack of glucose tablets should things get really desperate. Is
    > this a reasonable approach, given that the rest of the plans are totally unreasonable, or is it a
    > serious risk to my wellbeing ? - As much as I want this to be a 'once in a lifetime' experience, I
    > am a happily married father of three, so I don't want it to be the *last* experience of my
    > life....;-)

    I hope you have a really good time.

    Eat before you are hungry, drink before you are thirsty. Whilst on the road, avoid alcohol, meat and
    tobacco. [1]

    [1] Velocio's Golden Rules (part)

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
  11. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Helen Deborah Vecht" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Thus spake "Dave" <[email protected]>
    >
    >
    > > I'm planning on doing John O' Groats to Lands End next week with minimum planning (foolish
    > > man!).
    >
    > Good Luck! You *can* do it!
    >
    > > My plans for the ride, as a skeleton to build on for each day will be to start off with an Alpen
    > > bar, then find a roadside cafe
    (little
    > > chef;-) for a big fry-up type breakfast, then hit a fish & chip shop at
    the
    > > end of the day. I'll try and get some fruit during the course of the
    day.
    >
    > This combination sounds like far too little carbohydrate and too much fat for my liking. Some
    > people run quite well on fat though. Little Chef portions are not that big (My friend's cathphrase
    > is "Starve to death at a Li**** C*** !") and 100 miles per day needs around 3,000 *extra* kCal per
    > day. (You probably need 2,000 kCal per day just breathing in front of a computer.) You will have
    > to get these Calories somewhere and a family-sized slab of cake from a supermarket or village shop
    > will help. Be guided by what you fancy. If you crave for something, go for it. Tinned rice pudding
    > can be just the ticket, for some. make sure you have a tin opener!
    >
    >
    > > I'll also have a 2 litre water back pack on, being used and filled as needed. In reserve I'll
    > > have a couple of rowntrees jellies and a pack of glucose tablets should things get really
    > > desperate. Is this a reasonable approach, given that the rest of the plans are
    totally
    > > unreasonable, or is it a serious risk to my wellbeing ? - As much as I
    want
    > > this to be a 'once in a lifetime' experience, I am a happily married
    father
    > > of three, so I don't want it to be the *last* experience of my
    life....;-)
    >
    > I hope you have a really good time.
    >
    > Eat before you are hungry, drink before you are thirsty. Whilst on the road, avoid alcohol, meat
    > and tobacco. [1]
    >
    > [1] Velocio's Golden Rules (part)
    >
    > --
    > Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.

    Thanks very much for that Helen. I'm toying with the idea of a malt loaf per day and a couple of
    packs of hula-hoops / french fries to cover the carb bit. Was suprised to find that the crisps have
    more carbs than certain hi-energy, isotonic drinks. I know the drinks are balanced to ensure optimum
    utilisation, but it was still amusing. Whether on the road or not, I rarely touch alcohol or meat
    and never touch tobacco (well, not since I gave up (again) 12 months, 2 days, 4 hrs 6 mins and 23
    secs ago ;-). Being an eternal optimist, I will enjoy it...just hope I'm still alive when I finish!!
    Cheers, Dave.
     
  12. Thus spake "Dave" <[email protected]>

    > "Helen Deborah Vecht" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Thus spake "Dave" <[email protected]>
    > >
    > >
    > > > I'm planning on doing John O' Groats to Lands End next week with minimum planning (foolish
    > > > man!).
    > >
    > > Good Luck! You *can* do it!
    > >
    > > > My plans for the ride, as a skeleton to build on for each day will be to start off with an
    > > > Alpen bar, then find a roadside cafe
    > (little
    > > > chef;-) for a big fry-up type breakfast, then hit a fish & chip shop at
    > the
    > > > end of the day. I'll try and get some fruit during the course of the
    > day.
    > >
    > > This combination sounds like far too little carbohydrate and too much fat for my liking. Some
    > > people run quite well on fat though. Little Chef portions are not that big (My friend's
    > > cathphrase is "Starve to death at a Li**** C*** !") and 100 miles per day needs around 3,000
    > > *extra* kCal per day. (You probably need 2,000 kCal per day just breathing in front of a
    > > computer.) You will have to get these Calories somewhere and a family-sized slab of cake from a
    > > supermarket or village shop will help. Be guided by what you fancy. If you crave for something,
    > > go for it. Tinned rice pudding can be just the ticket, for some. make sure you have a tin
    > > opener!
    > >
    > >
    > > > I'll also have a 2 litre water back pack on, being used and filled as needed. In reserve I'll
    > > > have a couple of rowntrees jellies and a pack of glucose tablets should things get really
    > > > desperate. Is this a reasonable approach, given that the rest of the plans are
    > totally
    > > > unreasonable, or is it a serious risk to my wellbeing ? - As much as I
    > want
    > > > this to be a 'once in a lifetime' experience, I am a happily married
    > father
    > > > of three, so I don't want it to be the *last* experience of my
    > life....;-)
    > >
    > > I hope you have a really good time.
    > >
    > > Eat before you are hungry, drink before you are thirsty. Whilst on the road, avoid alcohol, meat
    > > and tobacco. [1]
    > >
    > > [1] Velocio's Golden Rules (part)
    > >
    > > --
    > > Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.

    > Thanks very much for that Helen. I'm toying with the idea of a malt loaf per day

    A malt loaf won't quite cut it calorie wise. 4 might but you may prefer a Cherry Genoa or a rich
    fruit cake. I's actually quite difficult to cram in several thousand extra calories in a short time.
    You will have to seek what seems palatable to you. (There are rumours that TdF riders had
    intravenous feeding at night to sustain them. I don't know the veracity of this)

    > and a couple of packs of hula-hoops / french fries to cover the carb bit.
    Hula hoops/crisps have lots of fat and too much salt in them for their carbohydrate content. (about
    11g fat in a 35g pack). You can drink a lot more in a 500ml bottle of chocky milk shake! (These are
    usually cheaper than 'sports' drinks.

    > Was suprised to find that the crisps have more carbs than certain hi-energy, isotonic drinks.

    Did you check the sodium (salt) & fat levels though?

    > I know the drinks are balanced to ensure optimum utilisation, but it was still amusing. Whether on
    > the road or not, I rarely touch alcohol or meat and never touch tobacco (well, not since I gave up
    > (again) 12 months, 2 days, 4 hrs 6 mins and 23 secs ago ;-). Being an eternal optimist, I will
    > enjoy it...just hope I'm still alive when I finish!!

    Good Luck!

    DON'T FORGET THE TIN OPENER! (it might be tinned peaches you crave...)

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
  13. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Helen Deborah Vecht" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Thus spake "Dave" <[email protected]>
    >
    >
    >
    > > "Helen Deborah Vecht" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > Thus spake "Dave" <[email protected]>
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > > I'm planning on doing John O' Groats to Lands End next week with
    minimum
    > > > > planning (foolish man!).
    > > >
    > > > Good Luck! You *can* do it!
    > > >
    > > > > My plans for the ride, as a skeleton to build on for each day will be to start off with an
    > > > > Alpen bar, then find a roadside cafe
    > > (little
    > > > > chef;-) for a big fry-up type breakfast, then hit a fish & chip shop
    at
    > > the
    > > > > end of the day. I'll try and get some fruit during the course of the
    > > day.
    > > >
    > > > This combination sounds like far too little carbohydrate and too much fat for my liking. Some
    > > > people run quite well on fat though. Little
    Chef
    > > > portions are not that big (My friend's cathphrase is "Starve to death
    at
    > > > a Li**** C*** !") and 100 miles per day needs around 3,000 *extra*
    kCal
    > > > per day. (You probably need 2,000 kCal per day just breathing in front of a computer.) You
    > > > will have to get these Calories somewhere and a family-sized slab of cake from a supermarket
    > > > or village shop will
    help.
    > > > Be guided by what you fancy. If you crave for something, go for it. Tinned rice pudding can be
    > > > just the ticket, for some. make sure you
    have
    > > > a tin opener!
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > > I'll also have a 2 litre water back pack on, being used and filled
    as
    > > > > needed. In reserve I'll have a couple of rowntrees jellies and a pack of
    glucose
    > > > > tablets should things get really desperate. Is this a reasonable approach, given that the
    > > > > rest of the plans are
    > > totally
    > > > > unreasonable, or is it a serious risk to my wellbeing ? - As much as
    I
    > > want
    > > > > this to be a 'once in a lifetime' experience, I am a happily married
    > > father
    > > > > of three, so I don't want it to be the *last* experience of my
    > > life....;-)
    > > >
    > > > I hope you have a really good time.
    > > >
    > > > Eat before you are hungry, drink before you are thirsty. Whilst on the road, avoid alcohol,
    > > > meat and tobacco. [1]
    > > >
    > > > [1] Velocio's Golden Rules (part)
    > > >
    > > > --
    > > > Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
    >
    > > Thanks very much for that Helen. I'm toying with the idea of a malt loaf per day
    >
    > A malt loaf won't quite cut it calorie wise. 4 might but you may prefer a Cherry Genoa or a rich
    > fruit cake. I's actually quite difficult to cram in several thousand extra calories in a short
    > time. You will have to seek what seems palatable to you. (There are rumours that TdF riders had
    > intravenous feeding at night to sustain them. I don't know the veracity of this)
    >
    What an idea...wouldn't need to stop at all then, could go for the record..hhhmmmm.....

    > > and a couple of packs of hula-hoops / french fries to cover the carb bit.
    > Hula hoops/crisps have lots of fat and too much salt in them for their carbohydrate content.
    > (about 11g fat in a 35g pack). You can drink a lot more in a 500ml bottle of chocky milk shake!
    > (These are usually cheaper than 'sports' drinks.
    >
    > > Was suprised to find that the crisps have more carbs than certain hi-energy, isotonic drinks.
    >
    > Did you check the sodium (salt) & fat levels though?
    >
    I know it's not a 'healthy' balance. I had heard that if you drink water you have to take care that
    you don't overdilute various nutrients in your system (!?!?) as this can be just as dangerous as
    becoming dehydrated. Does the sodium level in the crisps help counter this effect, do you know ?

    >

    > > I know the drinks are balanced to ensure optimum utilisation, but it was still amusing. Whether
    > > on the road or not, I rarely touch alcohol or meat and never
    touch
    > > tobacco (well, not since I gave up (again) 12 months, 2 days, 4 hrs 6
    mins
    > > and 23 secs ago ;-). Being an eternal optimist, I will enjoy it...just hope I'm still alive
    when
    > > I finish!!
    >
    >
    > Good Luck!
    >
    > DON'T FORGET THE TIN OPENER! (it might be tinned peaches you crave...)
    >
    > --
    > Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.

    Thanks again Helen. I was in the Navy 20-odd years ago for all of 6 weeks, then left when I realised
    the job was about killing people. They had really brilliant 'field' tin openers, only about 1"x2"
    big, pivoted to open out 90degrees and worked really well. Might see if I can find one in a camping
    shop over the weekend.

    Cheers, Dave.
     
  14. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:5%[email protected]...

    > Sorry to interrupt flow but... I'm planning on doing John O' Groats to Lands End next week with
    > minimum planning (foolish man!). I'm keeping everything to an absolute minimum and hoping to
    > achieve around 100 miles per day for upto 10 days.

    100 miles a day is some ask day after day. Be ready to take a day off if your body tells you its not
    really feeling up to it today when you wake. I've always found that, 4 to 6 days into a tour the
    mind may be ready to leave but the body is still curled up and asleep.

    Also, 100 miles is going to take a fair few hours each day. Add in the feeding times and pauses for
    a blow (and punctures, getting lost etc.) and you may find that its more than the hours of daylight
    at this time of year.

    As Helen has suggested -- too much fat. Again, personal experience is that I don't want to eat too
    much at each sitting so little & often may be the better route -- nothing wrong with two lunches!!
    Eat what and when you fancy. Hell, you will be burning a shed load of calories so your not going to
    be putting on weight. A simple dhal & rice whit a side order of nan bread kept me rocket powered in
    India. Some (unsalted) nuts and dried fruit work wonders for staving off the bonk. Much better not
    to have it than to try to glucose tab yourself out of it.

    Consider shifting the stuff (including water) off your back onto the bike. You know it makes sense!!

    Have fun.

    T
     
  15. Dave

    Dave Guest

    "Tony W" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:5%[email protected]...
    >
    > > Sorry to interrupt flow but... I'm planning on doing John O' Groats to Lands End next week with
    > > minimum planning (foolish man!). I'm keeping everything to an absolute minimum
    and
    > > hoping to achieve around 100 miles per day for upto 10 days.
    >
    > 100 miles a day is some ask day after day. Be ready to take a day off if your body tells you its
    > not really feeling up to it today when you wake. I've always found that, 4 to 6 days into a tour
    > the mind may be ready to leave but the body is still curled up and asleep.
    >
    As I live in the Midlands, I've got a promise to myself that if I'm slightly ahead of schedule, I
    might just stop off for a shower, warm comfy bed and the love of a good woman!!

    > Also, 100 miles is going to take a fair few hours each day. Add in the feeding times and pauses
    > for a blow (and punctures, getting lost etc.) and you may find that its more than the hours of
    > daylight at this time of
    year.

    I did 65 in 5.5 hours a couple of weeks ago, not particularly rushing it, but I reckon max of 10 hrs
    per day should do it. Seriously though, I'm saying thousand miles, 100 miles per day, 10 days. It
    isn't actually 1000 miles, it's probably closer to 850 - 900 I think. I've got the train tickets
    booked 12 days apart, so that gives me 10 days cycling....should work, I hope! ;-)

    >
    > As Helen has suggested -- too much fat. Again, personal experience is
    that
    > I don't want to eat too much at each sitting so little & often may be the better route -- nothing
    > wrong with two lunches!! Eat what and when you fancy. Hell, you will be burning a shed load of
    > calories so your not
    going
    > to be putting on weight. A simple dhal & rice whit a side order of nan bread kept me rocket
    > powered in India. Some (unsalted) nuts and dried
    fruit
    > work wonders for staving off the bonk. Much better not to have it than to try to glucose tab
    > yourself out of it.
    >

    Unsalted nuts and dried fruit...added to the list, thanks.

    > Consider shifting the stuff (including water) off your back onto the bike. You know it
    > makes sense!!
    >
    I've only got the water, few tools and rain clothes going on my back. I'll be using a saddle bag,
    bar bag and a snugpack sack for my sleeping equipment (hammock, sleeping bag and waterproof cover).
    So, 40 litres in all, excluding snugpack which should strap onto the top of the saddlebag.

    > Have fun.

    That's why I'm doing it.;-) and I'm a very determined individual.... I *WILL* have fun ;-)
    >
    > T
    >
    >
    Thanks lots,

    Dave.
     
  16. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > What an idea...wouldn't need to stop at all then, could go for the record..hhhmmmm.....

    On a conventional bicycle that would be 1 day, 20 hours, 4 minutes, 19 seconds; set by Gethin Butler
    going south to north. Good luck. ;-)

    Seriously, your 10 day target is quite tough enough. I have a feeling you're going to achieve it.
    The "good luck" above was ironic, but this one is sincere.

    --
    Dave...
     
  17. Thus spake "Dave" <[email protected]>

    > >
    > I know it's not a 'healthy' balance. I had heard that if you drink water you have to take care
    > that you don't overdilute various nutrients in your system (!?!?) as this can be just as
    > dangerous as becoming dehydrated. Does the sodium level in the crisps help counter this effect,
    > do you know ?

    It would, if you are not getting sufficient calt from all the other food you eat. Almost any
    manufactured food contains a lot. (Bread, cake, baked beans, bacon.....)

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
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