Helmet Comparison Articles ??

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Churchill, Jul 6, 2004.

  1. Churchill

    Churchill Guest

    Hello,

    Do you know where there are any good Helmet reviews for high quality helmets
    ?

    Perhaps, a comparison ?!

    Thank you
     
    Tags:


  2. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    What is a 'high quality helmet'? How is helmet quality measured?


    "Churchill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    | Hello,
    |
    | Do you know where there are any good Helmet reviews for high quality
    helmets
    | ?
    |
    | Perhaps, a comparison ?!
    |
    | Thank you
    |
    |
     
  3. Rich Clark

    Rich Clark Guest

    "Churchill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hello,
    >
    > Do you know where there are any good Helmet reviews for high quality

    helmets
    > ?
    >
    > Perhaps, a comparison ?!


    The helmets marketed by the major manufacturers all have the same
    certifications, which is the only guidance you'll find as to their potential
    effectiveness in protecting your head. Whether this is worth anything or not
    is a matter of opinion, but it has little bearing on helmet choice, since in
    this regard they're all the same.

    Which leaves fit, style, and comfort. Factors that don't stand up to
    objective comparisons.

    That's why the helmet market is all about image and subjectivity, and why
    price and "quality" have no relationship.

    If you want a helmet, you go try on a bunch until you find one that fits
    your head and has a retention system that will keep it in place without
    discomfort, and that you like the looks of. If you care about your place in
    the fashion pantheon, you buy one with lots of big holes that costs more
    than $100. If you don't, you buy one with lots of medium sized holes that
    costs $30.

    RichC
     
  4. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > "Churchill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > Do you know where there are any good Helmet reviews for high quality

    > helmets
    > > ?
    > >
    > > Perhaps, a comparison ?!

    >
    > The helmets marketed by the major manufacturers all have the same
    > certifications, which is the only guidance you'll find as to their potential


    Mostly, but not completely true: several of Specialized's helmet models
    meet the Snell standards in addition to the CPSC and ANSI standards.
    Most others do not.

    .....

    --
    Remove the ns_ from if replying by e-mail (but keep posts in the
    newsgroups if possible).
     
  5. Rich Clark wrote:

    >
    > The helmets marketed by the major manufacturers all have the same
    > certifications, which is the only guidance you'll find as to their potential
    > effectiveness in protecting your head. Whether this is worth anything or not
    > is a matter of opinion, but it has little bearing on helmet choice, since in
    > this regard they're all the same.
    >
    > Which leaves fit, style, and comfort. Factors that don't stand up to
    > objective comparisons.
    >
    > That's why the helmet market is all about image and subjectivity, and why
    > price and "quality" have no relationship.
    >
    > If you want a helmet, you go try on a bunch until you find one that fits
    > your head and has a retention system that will keep it in place without
    > discomfort, and that you like the looks of. If you care about your place in
    > the fashion pantheon, you buy one with lots of big holes that costs more
    > than $100. If you don't, you buy one with lots of medium sized holes that
    > costs $30.


    What Rich says is basically true, but he's omitted one thing:

    While all helmets in the USA have to pass the same standard, the
    expensive helmets - those with maximum ventilation, minimum weight,
    up-to-the-minute styling - tend to pass the impact standard with lower
    margins of safety. IOW, when you buy a $20 *-Mart helmet, you get more
    crash protection than when you spend $140 to look just like your racing
    hero.

    Consumer reports occasionally tests helmets, and I believe the current
    issue has such a test.


    --
    --------------------+
    Frank Krygowski [To reply, remove rodent and vegetable dot com,
    replace with cc.ysu dot edu]
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    >
    >
    >What is a 'high quality helmet'? How is helmet quality measured?


    By the amount of money they take from your wallet. :) Seriously ask
    any helmet maker if their super expensive model protects your head any
    better than their bargain basement model and see what they say.
    --------------
    Alex
     
  7. > >What is a 'high quality helmet'? How is helmet quality measured?
    >
    > By the amount of money they take from your wallet. :) Seriously ask
    > any helmet maker if their super expensive model protects your head any
    > better than their bargain basement model and see what they say.


    They'll say they don't! They'll be perfectly willing to admit that their
    top-line helmets are no safer than their less-expensive models. Once you
    get to the level of helmet where fit issues have been addressed (which
    occurs around $40), you don't buy a safer helmet when you go up the ladder.
    What you do (hopefully) get are-

    #1: Better ventilation. High-end helmets are often subject to wind-tunnel
    tests in a quest to improve aerodynamics and measure cooling.

    #2: Better graphics & appearance. Higher-end helmets are screened better,
    and the expanded polystyrene material is molded directly into the plastic
    shell, rather than being glued & taped to it.

    #3: Lighter weight. It takes a lot of work to get helmet weight down,
    while retaining the same crash protection.

    What you generally won't see is a manufacturer saying that one of their
    helmets is safer than another, as the admission that something isn't as safe
    as it could be is an invitation to lawsuits. However, it's entirely
    possible (perhaps even likely) that a less-expensive model may offer greater
    crash protection than a high-end one. Why? Because the manufacturer is
    going to work at shaving as much weight as possible from a high-end helmet
    until it can just pass the standards (tests) they're looking for. A
    lower-end helmet, on the other hand, isn't going to go through such
    scrutiny. If it passes the standard test, they're not going to go to the
    time & expense of finding out how much tougher a test it will pass, nor will
    they find out what they can remove or redesign and still have it pass.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  8. > While all helmets in the USA have to pass the same standard, the
    > expensive helmets - those with maximum ventilation, minimum weight,
    > up-to-the-minute styling - tend to pass the impact standard with lower
    > margins of safety. IOW, when you buy a $20 *-Mart helmet, you get more
    > crash protection than when you spend $140 to look just like your racing
    > hero.


    Not quite- the very cheapest helmets tend not to fit very well, and if the
    helmet's moving around on your head or incorrectly fastened, it's not likely
    to protect as well. The sweet spot- the place where you get the superior
    fit/retension systems- is around $40.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  9. On Wed, 7 Jul 2004 10:09:58 -0400, David Kerber
    <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in message
    <[email protected]>:

    >> The helmets marketed by the major manufacturers all have the same
    >> certifications, which is the only guidance you'll find as to their potential


    >Mostly, but not completely true: several of Specialized's helmet models
    >meet the Snell standards in addition to the CPSC and ANSI standards.
    >Most others do not.


    Endorsed. I was told by the guy who tests helemts to standards in the
    UK that Specialized is the only major brand he will recommend.

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
  10. On Wed, 07 Jul 2004 10:17:50 -0400, Frank Krygowski
    <[email protected]> wrote in message <[email protected]>:

    >While all helmets in the USA have to pass the same standard, the
    >expensive helmets - those with maximum ventilation, minimum weight,
    >up-to-the-minute styling - tend to pass the impact standard with lower
    >margins of safety. IOW, when you buy a $20 *-Mart helmet, you get more
    >crash protection than when you spend $140 to look just like your racing
    >hero.


    There may well be a lot of truth in this. Look at the list of
    manufacturers certified to Snell standards:

    AGV SpA
    Arai Helmet, Ltd.
    Hong Kong Sports Helmet Mfg., Ltd.
    Limar
    Mien Yow Industry Co., Ltd.
    OGK Hanbai Co., Ltd.
    ProRider, Inc.
    Qranc
    Specialized Bicycle Components
    Strategic Sports Ltd.
    Tong Ho Hsing Industrial Co., Ltd.
    Tung Kuang I Light Industry Co., Ltd.
    Zhu Hai Safety Helmet Manufacture Co. Ltd
    Zhuhai Golex Helmet-Making Co., Ltd.
    Zhuhai Star Safety Helmets Co., Ltd.

    I don't think I've missed any out.

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
  11. Rich Clark

    Rich Clark Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Wed, 7 Jul 2004 10:09:58 -0400, David Kerber
    > <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote in message
    > <[email protected]>:
    >
    > >> The helmets marketed by the major manufacturers all have the same
    > >> certifications, which is the only guidance you'll find as to their

    potential
    >
    > >Mostly, but not completely true: several of Specialized's helmet models
    > >meet the Snell standards in addition to the CPSC and ANSI standards.
    > >Most others do not.

    >
    > Endorsed. I was told by the guy who tests helemts to standards in the
    > UK that Specialized is the only major brand he will recommend.


    Not that I think it matters, but note that Specialized helmets are certified
    only to the Snell B-90 standard, which is no more demanding than the CPSC
    standard. That Snell did the certification tests and that Specialized paid
    for them (and the additional cost per helmet for the Snell sticker) may or
    may not mean anything to you, beyond the higher price.

    Me, I'm willing to accept that companies like Giro/Bell or Trek are capable
    of making sure their helmets meet the standards. If a Specialized helmet was
    a better fit at a given price point, that's what I'd buy. Everything else is
    highly theoretical and pretty much improvable.

    RichC
     
  12. Churchill

    Churchill Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Wed, 07 Jul 2004 10:17:50 -0400, Frank Krygowski
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message <[email protected]>:
    >
    > >While all helmets in the USA have to pass the same standard, the
    > >expensive helmets - those with maximum ventilation, minimum weight,
    > >up-to-the-minute styling - tend to pass the impact standard with lower
    > >margins of safety. IOW, when you buy a $20 *-Mart helmet, you get more
    > >crash protection than when you spend $140 to look just like your racing
    > >hero.

    >
    > There may well be a lot of truth in this. Look at the list of
    > manufacturers certified to Snell standards:
    >
    > AGV SpA
    > Arai Helmet, Ltd.
    > Hong Kong Sports Helmet Mfg., Ltd.
    > Limar
    > Mien Yow Industry Co., Ltd.
    > OGK Hanbai Co., Ltd.
    > ProRider, Inc.
    > Qranc
    > Specialized Bicycle Components
    > Strategic Sports Ltd.
    > Tong Ho Hsing Industrial Co., Ltd.
    > Tung Kuang I Light Industry Co., Ltd.
    > Zhu Hai Safety Helmet Manufacture Co. Ltd
    > Zhuhai Golex Helmet-Making Co., Ltd.
    > Zhuhai Star Safety Helmets Co., Ltd.
    >
    > I don't think I've missed any out.
    >
    > Guy


    Interesting, around the shops in Ottawa, ON., Canada the big sellers are
    Giro, Bell and Louis Garneau and not one is on the list -:)

    Good thing I asked !!
     
  13. On Wed, 7 Jul 2004 16:25:13 -0400, "Rich Clark"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    <[email protected]>:

    >Me, I'm willing to accept that companies like Giro/Bell or Trek are capable
    >of making sure their helmets meet the standards. If a Specialized helmet was
    >a better fit at a given price point, that's what I'd buy. Everything else is
    >highly theoretical and pretty much improvable.


    But the guy who tests them disagrees. He has had a lot of helmets
    fail the tests, even though they are notionally certified (CPSC has no
    independent testing, we're told). The only major brand he'll
    recommend, based on having hit and broken rather a lot of lids over
    the years, is Specialized. You can take that as you will.

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
  14. On Wed, 7 Jul 2004 16:29:29 -0400, "Churchill" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message <[email protected]>:

    >Interesting, around the shops in Ottawa, ON., Canada the big sellers are
    >Giro, Bell and Louis Garneau and not one is on the list -:)


    Maybe Bell is spending so much on funding dodgy "research" that they
    can't afford the certification programme any more ;-)

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
  15. Churchill

    Churchill Guest

  16. hit a curb with my helmet on, at 20 mph, while wearing Giro Pneumo. I was
    not overly impressed with the results. I was knocked out for about 1
    minute. Took about 2 hours for my thinking to return to normal. There was
    some cracking and broken Styrofoam, but not as much as I expected. Most of
    the torn styro was where the straps connect to the helmet. I feel if more
    of the helmet would have disintegrated, I wouldn't have ended up with such a
    headache.
     
  17. Rich Clark

    Rich Clark Guest

    "Callistus Valerius" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Kh%[email protected]
    > hit a curb with my helmet on, at 20 mph, while wearing Giro Pneumo. I was
    > not overly impressed with the results. I was knocked out for about 1
    > minute. Took about 2 hours for my thinking to return to normal. There

    was
    > some cracking and broken Styrofoam, but not as much as I expected. Most

    of
    > the torn styro was where the straps connect to the helmet. I feel if more
    > of the helmet would have disintegrated, I wouldn't have ended up with such

    a
    > headache.


    Sorry, there's nothing in any of the standards about protecting the wearer
    in a 20mph impact. If you have an embarrassing clipping-out incident at a
    stop light, however, you can probably rely on it to keep your head from
    denting the SUV waiting next to you.

    RichC
     
  18. "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message >
    > There may well be a lot of truth in this. Look at the list of
    > manufacturers certified to Snell standards:
    >

    Who cares about Snell, that's for motorcycle weenies.

    My Rudy Project has the EM1078.

    Anyway, riding around with a block of styrofoam on your head
    looks dumb, I just bought a classic Cinelli hair net on Ebay.
     
  19. On Thursday 08 July 2004 01:02, Callistus Valerius wrote:
    > hit a curb with my helmet on [...]
    > Took about 2 hours for my thinking to return to normal.


    That is far longer than we would imagine, yes.
     
  20. trg

    trg Guest

    On Thursday 08 July 2004 01:02, Callistus Valerius wrote:
    > hit a curb with my helmet on [...]
    > Took about 2 hours for my thinking to return to normal.

    You need quotation marks around the word "thinking".
     
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