Helmet Newbe Question

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by David, May 30, 2003.

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  1. David

    David Guest

    I'm looking to buy a helmet for my mountian bike though I mainly ride it on the road. There so many
    different makes and brands to choose from. Can anyone suggest a helmet that offers good protection
    mainly for road use but may do some off road riding.
     
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  2. "david" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm looking to buy a helmet for my mountian bike though I mainly ride it on the road. There so
    > many different makes and brands to choose from. Can anyone suggest a helmet that offers good
    > protection mainly for road use but may do some off road riding.

    Get a GIRO helmet. They're good quality and Giro stood by Lance Amstrong through his illness when
    Cofidis and other organisations wrote him off. As a coincidence I bought a Giro Corius helmet today,
    excellent, light and a perfect fit. GBP34-95.

    Ken.
     
  3. Gadget

    Gadget Guest

    I've always found Bells "Break it, we'll change it" policy kind of cool

    Gadget.
     
  4. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    Kenneth Clements advised:
    > Get a GIRO helmet. They're good quality ....

    Try on as many as you can. Different helmets suit different shape heads. As it happens, Giro helmets
    are the best shape for my head. I couldn't wear a Bell, a Met or a Specialized, although they all
    make perfectly good helmets.

    Once you've found a helmet you like, have a look at the manufacturer's website and see what standard
    certification it has in different parts of the world. CPSC (Consumer Product Safety Commission,
    required by law in the US) and Snell B95 are generally considered to be the toughest. You won't see
    them in UK helmets, UK helmets will just be marked CE. But I found with the Giro Eclipse that, while
    the European section of the Giro website makes no mention of any certification other than CE, the
    North American section reveals that it has CPSC certification.

    --
    Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    Thomas Paine
     
  5. "david" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm looking to buy a helmet for my mountian bike though I mainly ride it on the road. There so
    > many different makes and brands to choose from. Can anyone suggest a helmet that offers good
    > protection

    That's easy, there aren't any. The only thing a helmet will do is put a hole in your wallet and give
    you a false sense of security.

    Cheers

    Rich
     
  6. Tim Woodall

    Tim Woodall Guest

    On Fri, 30 May 2003 23:20:08 +0100, Richard Burton <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > "david" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> I'm looking to buy a helmet for my mountian bike though I mainly ride it on the road. There so
    >> many different makes and brands to choose from. Can anyone suggest a helmet that offers good
    >> protection
    >
    > That's easy, there aren't any. The only thing a helmet will do is put a hole in your wallet and
    > give you a false sense of security.
    >
    As an anti-compulsion, non-helmet wearer, I think I can disagree with this ;-)

    In a serious accident, a helmet is unlikely to do any good at all. In some it might be a critical
    factor, either in preventing, or causing, a serious injury.

    In a minor accident OTOH, especially lower speed loss of control accidents
    e.g. slipping on ice or oil, it may well make the difference between a cut head (maybe even
    requiring stitches) or a nasty headache and a "the helmet saved my life" annecdote.

    I've had one "serious" accident where my thick winter gloves took the brunt of the damage. While
    probably not crippling, I would suspect that without the gloves the damage to my hands might have
    permanently affected my ability to play the piano. However, I still don't wear thick winter gloves
    for cycling except when it is cold enough to need thick winter gloves, in fact I suspect that
    wearing gloves like that in summer would probably increase my risk of an accident as my hands would
    get too hot and sweaty. (I had a similar problem with helmets when I used to wear them with salty
    sweat running into my eyes and blinding me.)

    I'm quite willing to accept the risk of a nasty cut/headache/concussion in exchange for avoiding MY
    discomfort when wearing a helmet. Others either may not be prepared to accept these risks (and
    parents may make the decision for their children) or may not cycle in a manner that leads to sweat
    running down their face (either because they don't sweat as much or don't ride as hard) and also may
    not notice the clip and strap under the chin or may be prepared to accept the (admittedly) minor
    discomfort.

    I think that anybody who makes a reasoned choice to wear a helmet can probably avoid the risk
    compensation issues. But the pro-compulsion people, who put forward such ludicrous claims as
    compusory helmets would prevent 80% or all bicycle fatailies, are likely only to influence the
    unthinking (unknowing) majority who will just accept that a helmet is the panacea for all bicycle
    related danger.

    Would I continue to cycle if helmets were made compulsory? Yes. I would continue commuting as it is
    considerably more pleasurable by bike than by car, even in the worst of weather. But I probably
    wouldn't do as much social (pleasure) cycling. It doesn't take much for me not to go out at the
    weekends as it is (I enjoy the cycling but I have more demands on my time than I can fulfil so
    something always has to give) and a compulsory helmet might be enough to make a difference. I put in
    about 300 miles a month commuting and 200 miles a month social so a helmet could well halve (half?)
    my cycling.

    Regards,

    Tim.

    --
    God said, "div D = rho, div B = 0, curl E = - @B/@t, curl H = J + @D/@t," and there was light.

    http://tjw.hn.org/ http://www.locofungus.btinternet.co.uk/
     
  7. Daniel Auger

    Daniel Auger Guest

    On Fri, 30 May 2003, david wrote:

    > I'm looking to buy a helmet for my mountian bike

    To protect its headset? ;-)

    I think the snell mark is supposed to mean something. Put snell into Google and see what you get.

    --
    Daniel Auger - [email protected] (Please remove Granta to get a valid address.)
     
  8. Andy Dingley

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On Fri, 30 May 2003 20:51:57 +0100, david <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm looking to buy a helmet

    Get one that fits. Really fits. You're unlikely to find this in the first shop.

    Get one with lots of holes in it for ventilation. I've never noticed rain coming through one, but
    I've certainly felt the heat build up.

    Giro aren't bad, but there are some other decent ones too.

    Always wear it when posting to Usenet, with the word "helmet" in the subject.
     
  9. >Always wear it when posting to Usenet, with the word "helmet" in the subject.

    Asbestos underwear also recommended ;-)

    Cheers, helen s

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    Clean up the waste & get rid of the trapped wind to send a reply

    Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the keyboaRRRDdd
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  10. Dave Kahn

    Dave Kahn Guest

    On Sat, 31 May 2003 02:04:57 +0100, Andy Dingley <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Get one with lots of holes in it for ventilation. I've never noticed rain coming through one, but
    >I've certainly felt the heat build up.

    You can get a stretch rain cover for a ventilated helmet. This actually makes it quite an effective
    rain hat, but the heat does tend to build up more.

    --
    Dave...
     
  11. Andy Dingley

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On Sat, 31 May 2003 21:02:35 +0100, Dave Kahn <[email protected]> wrote:

    >You can get a stretch rain cover for a ventilated helmet.

    I had one (made it rather than buying it, so it fitted rather better)

    Then I lost it and had to cycle in the rain. As I can't tell the difference for wet hair, then I've
    never bothered to replace it.
     
  12. Mark Irvine

    Mark Irvine Guest

    "Richard Burton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "david" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I'm looking to buy a helmet for my mountian bike though I mainly ride it on the road. There so
    > > many different makes and brands to choose from. Can anyone suggest a helmet that offers good
    > > protection
    >
    > That's easy, there aren't any. The only thing a helmet will do is put a hole in your wallet and
    > give you a false sense of security.
    >
    > Cheers
    >
    > Rich
    >
    >
    >
    I think that it is safe to say that a helmet will not save you from *any* impact, but is will save
    you and lessen injuries from smaller ones. I remember seeing pictures of a helmet that someone
    destroyed while descending a hill outside castleton in the peaks. The helmet was in two halves, but
    did it's job. The wearer has mild concussion, no other damage. If he had not been wearing a helmet
    he would have had rather more, fractured skull minimum?

    Helmets *do* give protection, whether you wear one is your choice. I wear one as I know that if my
    head and something had a coming together I stand a better chance, foam absorbs energy better then my
    skull! If my head and something have a major coming together then I have a big problem!

    Mark
     
  13. Mark Irvine

    Mark Irvine Guest

    "david" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm looking to buy a helmet for my mountian bike though I mainly ride it on the road. There so
    > many different makes and brands to choose from. Can anyone suggest a helmet that offers good
    > protection mainly for road use but may do some off road riding.

    Just get a helmet that fits. Try them on lots. The first thing to look for it the protection, but
    also look for ventilation. Also if you tend to carry a rucsack on your back take that and your bike
    to the shop, make sure that you can keep your head up while wearing the rucksac!

    Ventilation holes are also good for keeping heat build up down.

    My current helmet is a specialised mountain man. Good helmet when I bought it three years ago.
    Coming up for replacement on age grounds... I think that they still make them and I will
    consider it again.

    Mark
     
  14. David Gillbe

    David Gillbe Guest

    > That's easy, there aren't any. The only thing a helmet will do is put a hole in your wallet and
    > give you a false sense of security.

    Sorry, this may have been said before, since I'm fairly new to this NG. I've been cycling for some
    years, and have always worn a helmet (except when I, for some reason, forget it). Other the past 5
    years or so I've found several things. Firstly, helmets have got much lighter and more comfortable
    as technology and research have improved. I now wear an excellent Giro "eclipse" which, although
    fairly expensive, I barely notice when I'm wearing
    it. In fact, I only really notice it when I'm *not* wearing it.

    I've also been involved in some nasty and some not so nasty cycling accidents. There have been
    times (e.g. when sideswiped by a trailer) that the helmet has done me no good whatsoever, but it
    certainly hasn't done me any harm. There have been other times (e.g. recently, when a car turned
    left in front of me, and I landed on the top corner of it's roof/door) that I am sure the helmet
    has prevented me from serious injury. I've been in two accidents that have put large cracks in my
    helmets, and I've suffered no damage whatsoever. I dread to think what would have happened to my
    scull had it not been for the helmet. Obviously, I may have been fine, but I don't really wish to
    test that and find it out.

    I think (from my experience) that those who suggest that helmets are useless are quite frankly,
    mislead or wrong. At the same time, everyone is allowed their opinions, and I'm certainly not in
    favour of forcing cyclists into cars by making helmet wearing compulsory.
     
  15. Howard

    Howard Guest

    Don't buy a Bell helmet.

    Quiz time.

    Who is the major commercial body behind the Bicycle Helmet Initative Trust (allegedy)...
     
  16. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Fri, 30 May 2003 20:51:57 +0100, david <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Can anyone suggest a helmet that offers good protection mainly for road use but may do some off
    >road riding.

    Well, I guess I'm not the first to say it but I'll say it anyway: this is a somewhat naive question.
    No helmet will offer "good protection for road use" - helmets may offer a degree of protection in
    certain kinds of crash, predominantly loss-of-control crashes at speeds below 15mph. Above 15mph, or
    where a motor vehicle is involved, you are outside the design parameters of the helmet.

    So before you buy a helmet get a copy of Effective Cycling by John Franklin (published by the
    Stationery Office). Then make sure you have some goggles or glasses to keep grit out of your eyes, a
    few bits of reflective clothing in case you're out in gloomy weather, lights in case you ride after
    dark - and then, after you've dealt with the things which will stop a crash happening in the first
    place, get a decent pair of track mitts or gloves and a helmet which fits snugly, doesn't slide
    around your head, which covers your temples (a helmet worn on the back of the head is a waste of
    time) and feels comfortable. Lastly, if more than one lid actually fits, choose one which has a
    detachable peak and looks good.

    Helmets which rely solely on different thickness foam pads for fit are not, as a rule, terribly good
    - look for lids which come in multiple sizes with adjustable thingies at the back as well as
    adjustable straps. Helmets with a Snell mark are better than those without. Helmets with a smooth
    rounded exterior and no exciting craggy bits at the back are reportedly less likely to cause
    unpredictable secondary effects in a crash. Helmets with copious amounts of venting are cooler in
    summer but may be larger overall, which (some people say) increases the chances of other
    unpredictable secondary effects in a crash.

    Last point: think of it as a "polystyrene foam deflector beanie" - this will help you remember how
    much protection it will give you against marauding cagers.

    Oh, that wasn't the last point. The last point is this: riding a bike is a safe, healthy and
    supremely efficient form of transport. Don't let the government scare you into wearing something
    which their scientists have repeatedly failed to prove gives any real benefit, remember that
    promoting helmets is lower risk for them than tackling bad driving. Wear a helmet only if you have
    assessed the risks and benefits and decided that you personally may benefit from the limited
    protection a helmet offers. I did and I wear one.

    Off my soapbox now. Happy cycling :)

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  17. David

    David Guest

    I started this thread I ended up buying a Met, it fits like a glove.
     
  18. John B

    John B Guest

    david wrote:

    > I started this thread I ended up buying a Met, it fits like a glove.

    You're supposed to put it on your head ;-)

    John B
     
  19. Andy Dingley

    Andy Dingley Guest

    On Sun, 01 Jun 2003 18:06:07 +0100, "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Helmets with copious amounts of venting are cooler in summer but may be larger overall, which (some
    >people say) increases the chances of other unpredictable secondary effects in a crash.

    OTOH, they're more likely to still be worn in weather like the last few days.
     
  20. Andymorris

    Andymorris Guest

    Dave Kahn wrote:
    > On Sat, 31 May 2003 02:04:57 +0100, Andy Dingley <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Get one with lots of holes in it for ventilation. I've never noticed rain coming through one, but
    >> I've certainly felt the heat build up.
    >
    > You can get a stretch rain cover for a ventilated helmet. This actually makes it quite an
    > effective rain hat, but the heat does tend to build up more.

    I've got a gortex one. I use it more to keep my head warm in winter, as I have a large head and so
    little spare room for hats. The cover and a buff keep my head lovely and warm. Also you can remove
    the cover if it warms up without stopping.

    When its not cold, who cares about wet hair?

    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

    Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
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