helmet or glasses mounted mirrors?

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Yuri Budilov, Feb 9, 2005.

  1. Yuri Budilov

    Yuri Budilov Guest

    greetings all

    I am looking to buy one of those helmet mounted (like a "Third-Eye"?) or
    "attached to glasses" rear view mirror because I am sick of cars trying to
    squeeze me off the road or missing me by a matter of inches when they
    overtake me.

    Two questions:

    Q1: does anyone have any opinions, assuming you are using or have used one
    of those?
    Q2: where can I buy them in Melbourne and how much?

    thanks!
     
    Tags:


  2. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On Wed, 09 Feb 2005 at 08:20 GMT, Yuri Budilov (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > greetings all
    >
    > I am looking to buy one of those helmet mounted (like a "Third-Eye"?) or
    > "attached to glasses" rear view mirror because I am sick of cars trying to
    > squeeze me off the road or missing me by a matter of inches when they
    > overtake me.
    >
    > Two questions:
    >
    > Q1: does anyone have any opinions, assuming you are using or have used one
    > of those?


    Very good! Hard to adjust routinely, and even harder to find the sweet
    spot when you first start out.

    But very useful. Sometimes I have to remember to watch the road in
    front of me though, on particularly hairy roads where I know *someone*
    is just itching to ram me.

    > Q2: where can I buy them in Melbourne and how much?


    Goldcross in Camberwell was where I got mine. $20[1] is a bit pricy
    for what seems like a bit of cheap plastic, but it works. Hasn't
    broken yet, despite trying hardest to get itself lost.

    [1] Same as in town. Oh fie, bad injoke, get back in your box.

    --
    TimC -- http://astronomy.swin.edu.au/staff/tconnors/
    If anyone tells me to work smarter, not harder, I will kick him
    or her, hard, in a random body part. I will then kick him or her
    a second time, "smarter, not harder," which is to say that on the
    second strike, I'll use the same force, but target more carefully.
    -- Catherine in Scary Devil Monastery
     
  3. Ray Peace

    Ray Peace Guest

    Yuri Budilov wrote:
    > greetings all
    >
    > I am looking to buy one of those helmet mounted (like a "Third-Eye"?) or
    > "attached to glasses" rear view mirror because I am sick of cars trying to
    > squeeze me off the road or missing me by a matter of inches when they
    > overtake me.
    >
    > Two questions:
    >
    > Q1: does anyone have any opinions, assuming you are using or have used one
    > of those?
    > Q2: where can I buy them in Melbourne and how much?
    >
    > thanks!
    >
    >

    Greetings,
    You don't buy them, you make them, I have had one for years.
    The components are:
    1. Old dental mirror (See local dentist for half a dozen)
    2. Bit of spoke
    3. Electrical cable connector (Dick Smith or similar)
    4. Epoxy glue
    Getting the bends in the spoke right and the aiming correct takes
    a while, but I wouldn't be without one for precisely the reason
    you give above.
    I prefer glasses mounted to handlebar mounted for a number of good
    reasons:
    1. It's doesn't get smashed or bent if you drop the bike
    2. Much less vibration, being attached to you, not the bike
    3. Much smaller, lighter and for that matter aerodynamic if you
    bother about such things (my bike has the aerodynamics of the
    average spud)
    Good luck with building your own, it's a lot more fun than just
    buying one.
    Regards,
    Ray.
     
  4. Mark Lee

    Mark Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > greetings all
    >
    > I am looking to buy one of those helmet mounted (like a "Third-Eye"?) or
    > "attached to glasses" rear view mirror because I am sick of cars trying to
    > squeeze me off the road or missing me by a matter of inches when they
    > overtake me.
    >

    How will the mirror scare the cars away from you?
    --
    Mark Lee
     
  5. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On Wed, 09 Feb 2005 at 20:55 GMT, Mark Lee (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] says...
    >> greetings all
    >>
    >> I am looking to buy one of those helmet mounted (like a "Third-Eye"?) or
    >> "attached to glasses" rear view mirror because I am sick of cars trying to
    >> squeeze me off the road or missing me by a matter of inches when they
    >> overtake me.
    >>

    > How will the mirror scare the cars away from you?


    You see them coming, and have time to carefully aim your sidewinders.

    --
    TimC -- http://astronomy.swin.edu.au/staff/tconnors/
    Obviously, "Mother Nature" disagrees with your assessment that money
    equates with success. I wonder who will win the argument? -- someone on /.
     
  6. Yuri Budilov

    Yuri Budilov Guest

    thank you to everyone who replied!
     
  7. geoffs

    geoffs New Member

    Joined:
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    I use a third-eye helmet mirror. When riding the tandem, I dont seem to turn my head as much or as easily as when I am riding a half-bike.
    The mirror is invaluable for spotting the morons before they get to close and it enables me to give a running commentry on what's coming up behind to my lovely stoker via the Tandem-com. This aids her to signal turns or corking
    when we approach round abouts. I hate cycling without a mirror and feel
    sorry for the die-hards who are more concerned with wether their mates will think they look like dorks than being able to avoid getting run over.
    It only takes one moron driver to ruin your day :eek:)

    Geoff
     
  8. aeek

    aeek New Member

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    Mirrors also let you ride wide in comfort for maximum visability, moving over if they don't give you the lane. Flat mirrors let you accurately judge the distance.
    Helmet mirrors are about the only flat mirrors commonly available.
     
  9. Bob C

    Bob C Guest

    Not necessarily, Third Eye make an excellent flat glasses mirror which clips
    onto the side arms of glasses - I've used one for a few years and it
    provides extra security - a quick check before moving out around a car for
    instance.

    Bob C

    "aeek" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > geoffs Wrote:
    >> I use a third-eye helmet mirror. When riding the tandem, I dont seem to
    >> turn my head as much or as easily as when I am riding a half-bike.
    >> The mirror is invaluable for spotting the morons before they get to
    >> close and it enables me to give a running commentry on what's coming up
    >> behind to my lovely stoker via the Tandem-com. This aids her to signal
    >> turns or corking
    >> when we approach round abouts.
    >>

    >
    > Mirrors also let you ride wide in comfort for maximum visability,
    > moving over if they don't give you the lane. Flat mirrors let you
    > accurately judge the distance.
    > Helmet mirrors are about the only flat mirrors commonly available.
    >
    >
    > --
    > aeek
    >
     
  10. aeek

    aeek New Member

    Joined:
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    OK so I should have said helmet/glasses as distinct from bike mounted.

    Personally, I use two bike mounted mirrors, flat right, curved left.
    Its scary how deceptive the curved mirror is and yet thats it for a bike mounted mirror. I had to go to a mirror shop to get the flat mirror put onto the bike mount and it was my risk if they couldn't do it.
     
  11. From: "aeek" <[email protected]>
    ..
    > Its scary how deceptive the curved mirror is and yet thats it for a
    > bike mounted mirror. I had to go to a mirror shop to get the flat
    > mirror put onto the bike mount and it was my risk if they couldn't do
    > it.


    My experience with mirrors has been two varieties of bar-mounted mirrors
    over the last 20 years. I tried a glasses-mount, but couldn't get used to
    the loss of perspective with the monocular vision nit givesyou. My bar
    mirror is a Rhode Gear model, and luckily I have some special bar-ends with
    a rear pointing section. This allows me to mount my mirror inboard of the
    bar-end, still giving a good view past my thigh, but if the bike falls or I
    lean it against a wall, the mirror remains correctly aligned. The mirror has
    a fairly mild convexity, but distances are still distorted. I've found that
    I readily got used to adjusting for this in traffic. The mirror is
    invaluable for traffic manoeuvres, controlling my road space and generally
    cycling with less stress about the hoons. The only times I find a bit of a
    disadvantage is on the open road trying to pick out a distant car or my
    cycling mates at more than about 100m behind, and a couple of times heavily
    corrugated roads have caused the bar-plug mount to vibrate out.

    When I'm riding the dually (no mirror) on the road I feel a bit awkward in
    traffic. Using the tourer with it's mirror in traffic I would commonly be
    watching the rear for up to 40% of the time to be in full control of my
    riding environment.

    Cheers
    Peter
     
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