Helmet question

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Derk, Apr 7, 2005.

  1. Derk

    Derk Guest

    Hi,

    I have had a Giro helios helmet for 5 years. I used it nearly every day, but
    it doesn't have a scratch yet.

    Is it really necessary to replace a helmet after 5 years or is it just a
    story to sell more helmets?

    Greets, Derk
     
    Tags:


  2. jtaylor

    jtaylor Guest


  3. >
    > I have had a Giro helios helmet for 5 years. I used it nearly every day,

    but
    > it doesn't have a scratch yet.
    >
    > Is it really necessary to replace a helmet after 5 years or is it just a
    > story to sell more helmets?
    >
    > Greets, Derk


    in my opinion no. only if you take a hit in the head, like I did once.
    I hit a curb with my head, and there was only a small dent and scratch on
    the outside. But the styrofoam on the inside was compressed on two of the
    ribs. As long as the styro isn't compressed it should work, and hope you
    don't have to have test it out. BTW, if you do take a hit in the head, the
    helmet will not prevent the resulting headache, so bring some aspirin too.
     
  4. Derk wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I have had a Giro helios helmet for 5 years. I used it nearly every

    day, but
    > it doesn't have a scratch yet.
    >
    > Is it really necessary to replace a helmet after 5 years or is it

    just a
    > story to sell more helmets?
    >
    > Greets, Derk


    I've read only one report of testing an old, old helmet, using the
    standard certification test. It passed easily. I'd say, if you
    haven't been using the helmet as a bucket for carrying acetone, it
    should be just as "good" as new.

    Also, keep in mind that the trend has been to lower helmet weights and
    increase ventilation holes, while still (barely) passing the
    certification standard. Your old helmet may even be more protective
    than the new one you'd buy. Still not any significant protection, mind
    you, but there it is.

    - Frank Krygowski
     
  5. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Thu, 07 Apr 2005 13:50:23 +0200, Derk <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I have had a Giro helios helmet for 5 years. I used it nearly every day, but
    >it doesn't have a scratch yet.
    >
    >Is it really necessary to replace a helmet after 5 years or is it just a
    >story to sell more helmets?


    If the foam seems sound, I'd keep using it. Neither of my helmets is
    newer than that, and I'm not worried. As for why they recommend the 5
    year replacement cycle, I suspect that this is the life expectancy of
    a helmet in daily use in the environment that is likely to degrade it
    most quickly. If that's the case, then they'll tell everyone to
    replace their helmet at 5 years so that the worst-case helmets will
    not stay in service.

    When inspecting the helmet, look at the material in the slots. If
    grainy sand-like particles are forming on the surface of the foam
    there, and particularly if they're able to be rubbed loose easily,
    then it might be time to think about replacing the helmet; that grainy
    powder is a sign that the plastic is starting to degrade.


    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  6. Derk

    Derk Guest

    Werehatrack wrote:


    > When inspecting the helmet, look at the material in the slots. If
    > grainy sand-like particles are forming on the surface of the foam
    > there, and particularly if they're able to be rubbed loose easily,
    > then it might be time to think about replacing the helmet; that grainy
    > powder is a sign that the plastic is starting to degrade.

    Mine is really like the ones you see new in a store, so I'll keep using it.
    It will always be better than wearing no helmet at all. Most riders I see
    here never wear a helmet.

    It would be interesting to see in bicycle magazine tests, though, if old
    helmets tend to fail or are still as good as new .

    Thanks, Derk
     
  7. Peter

    Peter Guest

    Derk wrote:

    > Werehatrack wrote:


    >>When inspecting the helmet, look at the material in the slots. If
    >>grainy sand-like particles are forming on the surface of the foam
    >>there, and particularly if they're able to be rubbed loose easily,
    >>then it might be time to think about replacing the helmet; that grainy
    >>powder is a sign that the plastic is starting to degrade.

    >
    > Mine is really like the ones you see new in a store, so I'll keep using it.
    > It will always be better than wearing no helmet at all. Most riders I see
    > here never wear a helmet.
    >
    > It would be interesting to see in bicycle magazine tests, though, if old
    > helmets tend to fail or are still as good as new .


    There's a report here:
    http://www.bhsi.org/biker.htm of a test done on a ten year old
    sun-yellowed Bell Biker that showed it still performed about the same as
    when new. Don't know of any more recent tests.
     
  8. Jim Smith

    Jim Smith Guest

    "Callistus Valerius" <[email protected]> writes:

    >>
    >> I have had a Giro helios helmet for 5 years. I used it nearly every day,

    > but
    >> it doesn't have a scratch yet.
    >>
    >> Is it really necessary to replace a helmet after 5 years or is it just a
    >> story to sell more helmets?
    >>
    >> Greets, Derk

    >
    > in my opinion no. only if you take a hit in the head, like I did once.
    > I hit a curb with my head, and there was only a small dent and scratch on
    > the outside. But the styrofoam on the inside was compressed on two of the
    > ribs. As long as the styro isn't compressed it should work, and hope you
    > don't have to have test it out. BTW, if you do take a hit in the head, the
    > helmet will not prevent the resulting headache, so bring some aspirin too.


    Better to make that acetaminophen instead. Aspirin might make any
    bleeding in your brain worse.
     
  9. Wayne Grow

    Wayne Grow Guest

    >
    > Better to make that acetaminophen instead. Aspirin might make any
    > bleeding in your brain worse.


    very true, aspirin is a blood thinner.
     
  10. Derk

    Derk Guest

    Jim Smith wrote:


    > Better to make that acetaminophen instead. Aspirin might make any
    > bleeding in your brain worse.

    And many people are allergic to Aspirin!

    Greets, Derk
     
  11. On Thu, 07 Apr 2005 23:13:50 +0200, Derk
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Jim Smith wrote:
    >
    >
    >> Better to make that acetaminophen instead. Aspirin might make any
    >> bleeding in your brain worse.

    >And many people are allergic to Aspirin!
    >
    >Greets, Derk


    Dear Derk,

    Well, 1% of the normal population is many people when there
    are billions of people:

    http://www.allergycapital.com.au/Pages/aspirin.html

    Carl Fogel
     
  12. Derk

    Derk Guest

    [email protected] wrote:


    > Well, 1% of the normal population is many people when there
    > are billions of people:

    I know, but 50% of my family is allergic to aspirin and I have seen what
    happens when they get aspirin or any other medicine containing Acetyl
    Salicylic Acid,so I thought it would be good to mention the possibility.

    Furthermore, I read an article in my newspaper about pharmaceutical
    companies and the way they make the number of side effects smaller by
    splitting side effects into many categories.
    Just an example I just made up: head ache, 1% or less. But this number isn't
    right because for example another 2,5 % get migraine and 1,5% get another
    form of headache (rebound headache or sinus headache). If you add all these
    numbers up, the result is far bigger than the mentioned 1% who get a
    standard headache.

    Then there's the difference between allergy and intolerance. Many people
    suffer from intolerance, without ever getting an allergic reaction.

    Greetings, Derk
     
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