Helmet Visor

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by scituatejohn, Sep 26, 2003.

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  1. scituatejohn

    scituatejohn New Member

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    I got a new helmet recently. It had a visor. The visor didn’t work for me. It was obscuring my vision when I was on the drops, so I got rid of it. Is this because the helmet did not fit, or because the visors have a bad design?
     
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  2. David

    David Guest

    "scituatejohn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I got a new helmet recently. It had a visor. The visor didn't work for
    > me. It was obscuring my vision when I was on the drops, so I got rid of
    > it. Is this because the helmet did not fit, or because the visors have a bad design?

    Maybe it wasn't designed for riding in the drops. It may have changed now, but last time I bought a
    helmet, helmets with visors were MTB models.
     
  3. David wrote:
    > "scituatejohn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> I got a new helmet recently. It had a visor. The visor didn't work for me. It was obscuring my
    >> vision when I was on the drops, so I got rid of it. Is this because the helmet did not fit, or
    >> because the visors have a bad design?
    >
    > Maybe it wasn't designed for riding in the drops. It may have changed now, but last time I bought
    > a helmet, helmets with visors were MTB models.

    More or less. The visors are mainly used for off road riding. Mý Giro Pneumo with the Lance logo is
    definitely a Roadie helmet, but it came with a visor that I've never seen anybody on the road use. I
    just think they wan't to sell the same helmet to as many groups as possible.

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  4. On Fri, 26 Sep 2003 10:46:21 +0000, David wrote:

    >
    > "scituatejohn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> I got a new helmet recently. It had a visor. The visor didn't work for
    >> me. It was obscuring my vision when I was on the drops, so I got rid of
    >> it. Is this because the helmet did not fit, or because the visors have a bad design?
    >
    > Maybe it wasn't designed for riding in the drops. It may have changed now, but last time I bought
    > a helmet, helmets with visors were MTB
    models.

    This is true, but I find a visor to be useful on the road as well, especially near sundown. I
    haven't had any problems seeing around the visor; it's no more of an obstruction than the
    bill of a cap.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Enron's slogan: Respect, Communication, Integrity, and _`\(,_ | Excellence. (_)/ (_) |
     
  5. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Fri, 26 Sep 2003 10:46:21 +0000, David wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > "scituatejohn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > >> I got a new helmet recently. It had a visor. The visor didn't work for
    > >> me. It was obscuring my vision when I was on the drops, so I got rid of
    > >> it. Is this because the helmet did not fit, or because the visors have a bad design?
    > >
    > > Maybe it wasn't designed for riding in the drops. It may have changed now, but last time I
    > > bought a helmet, helmets with visors were MTB
    > models.
    >
    > This is true, but I find a visor to be useful on the road as well, especially near sundown. I
    > haven't had any problems seeing around the visor; it's no more of an obstruction than the bill
    > of a cap.

    Yeah, and like the bill of a cap, it's good at deflecting rain from your glasses and shading your
    eyes from oncoming headlights at night.

    I think visors are a hazard off-road, at least if you're riding in the woods. I've gotten clobbered
    several times by low branches I didn't see.

    Why "road" helmets don't have visors and "MTB" helmets do is beyond me. I think the styles should
    be reversed.
     
  6. scit-<< I got a new helmet recently. It had a visor. The visor didn’t work for
    me. It was obscuring my vision when I was on the drops, so I got rid of
    mf. Is this because the helmet did not fit, or because the visors have a bad design? >><BR><BR>

    Visors are for promarily MTB guys altho I question it's utility even for those. Kinda like trying to
    make bag mounted water bags the answer to something for road riders. Not necessary, just chuck it.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  7. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > Visors are for promarily MTB guys altho I question it's utility even for
    those.
    > Kinda like trying to make bag mounted water bags the answer to something
    for
    > road riders. Not necessary, just chuck it.
    >
    > Peter Chisholm

    To wit, I was MTB'ing with a friend who was wearing a visor helmet..he had his head down a bit
    (technical trail..) and he was unable to see the approaching fallen tree across the trail... Me
    being behind (as is usually the case..), I didn't see the need to warn him as he was clearly in the
    lead (and letting me know he was in the lead!). I looked down to negotiate a serious bit of
    root-work and when I looked up I saw my helmeted friend wedged under the fallen tree, head askew,
    helmet working wonderfully to protect his head..his neck, welll.... In any event, I'm sure he would
    have seen the tree if not for the stylish visor!!

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  8. Tim McTeague

    Tim McTeague Guest

    > To wit, I was MTB'ing with a friend who was wearing a visor helmet..he had his head down a bit
    > (technical trail..) and he was unable to see the approaching fallen tree across the trail... Me
    > being behind (as is usually the case..), I didn't see the need to warn him as he was clearly in
    > the lead (and letting me know he was in the lead!). I looked down to negotiate a serious bit of
    > root-work and when I looked up I saw my helmeted friend wedged under the fallen tree, head askew,
    > helmet working wonderfully to protect his head..his neck, welll.... In any event, I'm sure he
    > would have seen the tree if not for the stylish visor!!
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Scott..

    Right! And if you are riding in the woods why do you need to shield your eyes anyway? My guess this
    design comes from the West coast where there is more sunshine an fewer trees. Here on the East coast
    I can't even wear sunglasses when mt biking and I only go in Winter. Even then, the contrast is too
    great to make dark glasses usefull. As for visors, mine came off after one trial run. I went under a
    downed tree and thought I had enough clearence. At the last sec. I dropped my head but the tip on my
    Blackburn pump caught a vine on the tree and brought me to a stop. Bent the pump back semi straight,
    visor ripped off, on with the ride.

    Tim McTeague
     
  9. Peter

    Peter Guest

    On Fri, 26 Sep 2003 20:03:31 GMT, "Peter Cole" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Yeah, and like the bill of a cap, it's good at deflecting rain from your glasses and shading your
    >eyes from oncoming headlights at night.
    >

    I agree.

    I use a visor from a motorcycle helmet. They are economical and work better than what I've
    seen for bike helmets. I take the snaps off and use double-sticky foam to attach it to the
    helmet. I then wrap a couple of loops of tape all the way around both helmet and visor. I
    use a smoke-colored one--which is somewhat translucent. I paint or tape the upper half to
    shade me from the sun. The lower half lets me look through it and get some protection from
    extreme glare, auto headlights, or low sun.

    Peter
     
  10. Tim McTeague wrote:
    >
    > Right! And if you are riding in the woods why do you need to shield your eyes anyway? My guess
    > this design comes from the West coast where there is more sunshine an fewer trees. Here on the
    > East coast I can't even wear sunglasses when mt biking and I only go in Winter. Even then, the
    > contrast is too great to make dark glasses usefull. As for visors, mine came off after one trial
    > run. I went under a downed tree and thought I had enough clearence. At the last sec. I dropped my
    > head but the tip on my Blackburn pump caught a vine on the tree and brought me to a stop. Bent the
    > pump back semi straight, visor ripped off, on with the ride.
    >
    > Tim McTeague

    Do you carry your pump on your helmet? Attached to the visor? BTW what is semi straight ;-)
    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  11. I find a visor helpful at night for dealing with oncoming headlights. It's also nice when I'm riding
    westward near sunset. If I were a morning person, I imagine it would also be useful riding eastward
    in the morning...but I usually get up at the crack of ten, so that's not an issue.

    The applicability of a visor depends largely on your riding posture. If your handlebars are low
    compared to your saddle, so you lean forward sharply, a visor may obstruct your vision. This can
    cause you to tilt your head up excessively to raise the visor, leading to neck discomfort.

    If your handlebars are higher, and you ride in a more upright posture, a visor is more likely to
    be helpful.

    My helmet has a small visor, and had been quite satisfactory for a while. Last fall I went on the
    Atkins diet and lost about 40 pounds. As a result, I started using the drops again, and generally
    adopted a more aggressive posture, and the visor started to bother me.

    However, this spring I shaved my head, and once my pony tail was gone, my helmet could sit farther
    back on my noggin, so all is well again.

    Sheldon "Nobody Recognizes Me Any More If I Don't Have My Helmet On" Brown
    +-------------------------------------------+
    | Ah, but I was so much older then, | I'm younger than that now. | -Bob Dylan |
    +-------------------------------------------+ Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts Phone
    617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  12. Tim McTeague

    Tim McTeague Guest

    > Do you carry your pump on your helmet?

    Duh! The pump was in my CamelBak and pokes out it's pocket a bit. I ducked my head just in the
    nick of time but my CamelBak, or at least the pump handle, snagged the vine wrapped around the
    downed tree.

    Attached to the visor? BTW
    > what is semi straight ;-)

    The pump handle was bent about 90 degrees. I managed to bend it back enough so I could at least stow
    it mostly out of the way. Tossed in the can when I got home as it was not straight enough to work.

    Tim McTeague
     
  13. Tim McTeague wrote:
    >> Do you carry your pump on your helmet?
    >
    > Duh! The pump was in my CamelBak and pokes out it's pocket a bit. I ducked my head just in the
    > nick of time but my CamelBak, or at least the pump handle, snagged the vine wrapped around the
    > downed tree.
    >
    >
    > Attached to the visor? BTW
    >> what is semi straight ;-)
    >
    > The pump handle was bent about 90 degrees. I managed to bend it back enough so I could at least
    > stow it mostly out of the way. Tossed in the can when I got home as it was not straight enough
    > to work.
    >
    > Tim McTeague

    Hehe. Thanks for replying on such a flame. I just couldn't resist it ;) Those Camelbaks are mighty
    strong eh.

    I just bought a Topeak saddlebag that has a pump attachment on the bottom. The pump handle kind of
    sticks straight out behind you, but doesn't really do any harm. My SKS pump however didn't really
    fit. Maybe I have to get a Topeak pump?

    --
    Perre

    You have to be smarter than a robot to reply.
     
  14. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Fri, 26 Sep 2003 10:46:21 -0700, "David" <[email protected]> may have said:

    >
    >"scituatejohn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> I got a new helmet recently. It had a visor. The visor didn't work for
    >> me. It was obscuring my vision when I was on the drops, so I got rid of
    >> it. Is this because the helmet did not fit, or because the visors have a bad design?
    >
    >Maybe it wasn't designed for riding in the drops. It may have changed now, but last time I bought a
    >helmet, helmets with visors were MTB models.

    That seems to be the way the marketing is aimed Is it possible that they think the roadies would
    spurn the visor as being not aerodynamic? For me, a visor is far more useful on the road than off.
    Most of the unpaved trails around here are shady, and full of overhanging branches; the visor would
    not only be superfluous, but maybe a hazard. Of course, since most of the folks on the *paved*
    trails (and streets, for that matter) are riding an mtb rather than a road bike, it's probably true
    that the visors are designed for an mtb rider who's riding in a sunny spot. The makers might just be
    aiming for the biggest market segment. This is just speculation, of course.

    Meanwhile, when I want a visor, I use one for tennis players (and such). The helmet goes on over it,
    and it can be removed and pocketed easily if not needed.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail. Yes, I have a killfile. If I
    don't respond to something, it's also possible that I'm busy.
     
  15. S. Anderson

    S. Anderson Guest

    "Werehatrack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > That seems to be the way the marketing is aimed Is it possible that they think the roadies would
    > spurn the visor as being not aerodynamic?

    <<snip..>>

    Nah, in my opinion, it's an image thing. When I indicated to some road-only friends of mine that I
    was going to compete in some low-level crit races for fun in the evening, they began commenting on
    the "MTB" pedals I have on my road bike and the visor on my helmet. "You can't race like that!". I
    mean, the visor doesn't perform much useful purpose as far as I can tell, but still, to occlude the
    entry of someone just because of the visor and MTB pedals is a bit much.

    Cheers,

    Scott..
     
  16. David

    David Guest

    "S. Anderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Nah, in my opinion, it's an image thing.

    Until I read the original post, it had never occured to me that it could be anything but image. I
    use the same helmet with visor on & off-road. But I wouldn't criticize the design of an MTB helmet
    if the visor was annoying when riding in the drops.
     
  17. Raptor

    Raptor Guest

    David wrote:
    > "S. Anderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>Nah, in my opinion, it's an image thing.
    >
    >
    > Until I read the original post, it had never occured to me that it could be anything but image. I
    > use the same helmet with visor on & off-road. But I wouldn't criticize the design of an MTB helmet
    > if the visor was annoying when riding in the drops.

    I have one helmet (until I can afford to buy an expensive well-vented racing hardhat), and it came
    with a visor. Fortunately, the visor snaps on and off easily, because it most certainly obstructs my
    vision on my road bike regardless of riding position. I do appreciate the way it keeps the sun off
    my nose/face when on my mtb though.

    --
    --
    Lynn Wallace http://www.xmission.com/~lawall "I'm not proud. We really haven't done everything we
    could to protect our customers. Our products just aren't engineered for security." --Microsoft VP in
    charge of Windows OS Development, Brian Valentine.
     
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