helmets and mirrors

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Esmail Bonakdar, Apr 14, 2003.

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  1. Hello all

    For the longest time I have held on to my hardshell BELL helmet, primarily because it offers a nice
    safe and sturdy way to attach a rear-view mirror.

    Last time I checked (I admit it's been a while), the newer helmets didn't seem to allow rear-view
    mirrors to be attached in a nice stable way - is that still the case? I saw velcro and other fairly
    "wobbly" arrangements.

    I have really come to depend on my helmet mirror over these many years, but this helmet is really
    not safe any more so I'd like to get a new one, but one where I can mount a mirror that won't fall
    off or get misadjusted all the time.

    Can anyone share their experiences and/or make some recommendations?

    Thanks a lot.

    Esmail
    ---
    Esmail Bonakdarian - [email protected] - http://www.cs.mercer.edu/bonak 32N 83W
     
    Tags:


  2. Richard

    Richard Guest

    There's a guy (Harris?) that makes mirrors attached to old spokes. There are ways to clamp them onto
    styro helmets, weave them through air vents, etc. Personally, though, I prefer the temple piece
    mirrors...

    Esmail Bonakdarian <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > Hello all
    >
    > For the longest time I have held on to my hardshell BELL helmet, primarily because it offers a
    > nice safe and sturdy way to attach a rear-view mirror.
    >
    > Last time I checked (I admit it's been a while), the newer helmets didn't seem to allow rear-view
    > mirrors to be attached in a nice stable way - is that still the case? I saw velcro and other
    > fairly "wobbly" arrangements.
    >
    > I have really come to depend on my helmet mirror over these many years, but this helmet is really
    > not safe any more so I'd like to get a new one, but one where I can mount a mirror that won't fall
    > off or get misadjusted all the time.
     
  3. On Mon, 14 Apr 2003 16:52:30 -0400, Esmail Bonakdarian wrote:

    > Hello all
    >
    > For the longest time I have held on to my hardshell BELL helmet, primarily because it offers a
    > nice safe and sturdy way to attach a rear-view mirror.
    >
    > Last time I checked (I admit it's been a while), the newer helmets didn't seem to allow rear-view
    > mirrors to be attached in a nice stable way - is that still the case? I saw velcro and other
    > fairly "wobbly" arrangements.

    There are a couple of brands of mirrors that fit onto the outside of helmets with adhesive. They
    work fine.

    > I have really come to depend on my helmet mirror over these many years, but this helmet is really
    > not safe any more so I'd like to get a new one, but one where I can mount a mirror that won't fall
    > off or get misadjusted all the time.

    You can't stop misadjustment; you just have to readjust. Double-sided tape does a good job
    reattaching if the base does fall off.

    You probably will find the new helmets to be significantly more comfortable (lighter, better
    fitting) as well as providing better protection than your old Bell.
     
  4. richard wrote:
    >
    > There's a guy (Harris?) that makes mirrors attached to old spokes. There are ways to clamp them
    > onto styro helmets, weave them through air vents, etc.

    Kind of like the first helmet mirrors used to be mounted?

    > Personally, though, I prefer the temple piece mirrors...

    What are temple piece mirrors?

    Thanks Esmail
    ---
    Esmail Bonakdarian - [email protected] - http://www.cs.mercer.edu/bonak 32N 83W
     
  5. Hi Steve,

    Steve Palincsar wrote:
    >
    > > didn't seem to allow rear-view mirrors to be attached in a nice stable way - is that still the
    > > case? I saw velcro and other fairly "wobbly" arrangements.
    >
    > There are a couple of brands of mirrors that fit onto the outside of helmets with adhesive. They
    > work fine.
    >
    > > I have really come to depend on my helmet mirror over these many years, but this helmet is
    > > really not safe any more so I'd like to get a new one, but one where I can mount a mirror that
    > > won't fall off or get misadjusted all the time.
    >
    > You can't stop misadjustment; you just have to readjust. Double-sided tape does a good job
    > reattaching if the base does fall off.

    Could you make some recommendations regarding mirrors/helmets you like or think that would be ok?

    FWIW, I'm a cycle-tourist, i.e., the more leisurely type, so I am not obsessed about weight etc.
    (Well, obviously not if I'm still riding with my Bell :)

    > You probably will find the new helmets to be significantly more comfortable (lighter, better
    > fitting) as well as providing better protection than your old Bell.

    That would be fine by me :)

    Thanks for taking the time to write.

    Esmail
    ---
    Esmail Bonakdarian - [email protected] - http://www.cs.mercer.edu/bonak 32N 83W
     
  6. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    Get a Take a Look mirror and stick the prongs into the styrofoam. You can use a bit of glue
    when doing so. It does stay fine. They make a stick on holder to do the same but that doesn't
    work as well.
     
  7. Michael Dart

    Michael Dart Guest

    "Esmail Bonakdarian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hello all
    >
    > For the longest time I have held on to my hardshell BELL helmet, primarily because it offers a
    > nice safe and sturdy way to attach a rear-view mirror.
    >
    > Last time I checked (I admit it's been a while), the newer helmets didn't seem to allow rear-view
    > mirrors to be attached in a nice stable way - is that still the case? I saw velcro and other
    > fairly "wobbly" arrangements.
    >
    > I have really come to depend on my helmet mirror over these many years, but this helmet is really
    > not safe any more so I'd like to get a new one, but one where I can mount a mirror that won't fall
    > off or get misadjusted all the time.
    >
    > Can anyone share their experiences and/or make some recommendations?
    >
    > Thanks a lot.
    >
    > Esmail
    > ---
    > Esmail Bonakdarian - [email protected] -
    http://www.cs.mercer.edu/bonak
    > 32N 83W

    Here you go:

    http://www.reevu.com/product_design.htm

    Mike
     
  8. Doug Huffman

    Doug Huffman Guest

    I like my Third Eye Micro Mirror.

    "Esmail Bonakdarian" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Hello all
    >
    > For the longest time I have held on to my hardshell BELL helmet, primarily because it offers a
    > nice safe and sturdy way to attach a rear-view mirror.
    >
    > Last time I checked (I admit it's been a while), the newer helmets didn't seem to allow rear-view
    > mirrors to be attached in a nice stable way - is that still the case? I saw velcro and other
    > fairly "wobbly" arrangements.
    >
    > I have really come to depend on my helmet mirror over these many years, but this helmet is really
    > not safe any more so I'd like to get a new one, but one where I can mount a mirror that won't fall
    > off or get misadjusted all the time.
    >
    > Can anyone share their experiences and/or make some recommendations?
    >
    > Thanks a lot.
    >
    > Esmail
    > ---
    > Esmail Bonakdarian - [email protected] -
    http://www.cs.mercer.edu/bonak
    > 32N 83W
     
  9. Esmail Bonakdarian wrote:
    >
    > richard wrote:
    > >
    >
    > > Personally, though, I prefer the temple piece mirrors...
    >
    > What are temple piece mirrors?

    I believe he means mirrors which fasten to the side of glasses. I prefer that too. Eyeglass mirrors
    are steadier than helmet-mounted mirrors, and can be used no matter what hat (if any) a person
    chooses to wear.

    --
    Frank Krygowski [email protected]
     
  10. Esmail Bonakdarian wrote:
    >
    >
    > Steve Palincsar wrote:
    >
    > > You probably will find the new helmets to be significantly more comfortable (lighter, better
    > > fitting) as well as providing better protection than your old Bell. ^^^^^^
    > ^^^^^^^^^^ That would be fine by me :)

    It sounds nice, but it's not necessarily true!

    The "best" new helmet cut the impact regulations razor-thin. The cheaper ones have more protection -
    although still not much.

    --
    Frank Krygowski [email protected]
     
  11. Richard Ney

    Richard Ney Guest

    Esmail Bonakdarian writes:

    > For the longest time I have held on to my hardshell BELL helmet, primarily because it offers a
    > nice safe and sturdy way to attach a rear-view mirror.
    >
    > Last time I checked (I admit it's been a while), the newer helmets didn't seem to allow rear-view
    > mirrors to be attached in a nice stable way - is that still the case? I saw velcro and other
    > fairly "wobbly" arrangements.
    >
    > I have really come to depend on my helmet mirror over these many years, but this helmet is really
    > not safe any more so I'd like to get a new one, but one where I can mount a mirror that won't fall
    > off or get misadjusted all the time.
    >
    > Can anyone share their experiences and/or make some recommendations?

    Yes. Learn to ride without the mirror; it's a crutch and, ultimately, a safety hazard, not a
    safety solution.

    Learning to listen and watch traffic, turn your head quickly to see behind you without swerving, and
    stay relaxed and nimble on the bike will save you in heavy traffic. I've had one bad accident
    cycling in Manhattan in the last 6 years (~ 10,000 miles annually) and it had nothing to do with
    traffic. Messengers here never use mirrors nor do any of my cycling friends. The only folks I ever
    see using the things are slow, unsteady riders that are severely lacking in basic bike handling
    skills. Chuck the mirror!
     
  12. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    > > Can anyone share their experiences and/or make some recommendations?
    >
    > Yes. Learn to ride without the mirror; it's a crutch and, ultimately, a safety hazard, not a
    > safety solution.
    >
    > Learning to listen and watch traffic, turn your head quickly to see behind you without swerving,
    > and stay relaxed and nimble on the bike will save you in heavy traffic. I've had one bad accident
    > cycling in Manhattan in the last 6 years (~ 10,000 miles annually) and it had nothing to do with
    > traffic. Messengers here never use mirrors nor do any of my cycling friends. The only folks I ever
    > see using the things are slow, unsteady riders that are severely lacking in basic bike handling
    > skills. Chuck the mirror!

    I think mirrors work very well, particularly in urban environments, where there is a typically lot
    of merging to be done. I use a mirror while cycling the same way I use one while driving. I don't
    stare into it, only glance frequently to stay aware of traffic behind me. That way, merging around
    potholes, double parked vehicles, etc. doesn't require a head check.

    Many of the, even very experienced, riders I've seen can't do a head check without significant
    weaving. Head checks use your peripheral vision (unless your head swivels like an owl's), which is
    really pretty poor at anything other than motion detection. If you wear corrective lenses,
    peripheral vision is often outside of the optical path, further degrading it.

    I find a mirror much more useful in urban, rather than rural surroundings. Head checks are just too
    slow to keep up with a rapidly changing environment. I prefer an eyeglass mounted mirror to a helmet
    or handlebar mount. I've used "Third Eye" mirrors, but I don't like them much. Their ball joint
    swivels loosen, and are bulky enough to get in the way with the inside of the helmet. As for the
    "slow, unsteady, rider" thing, I'm not a racer, but I do a lot of fast club riding. In the pace
    line, I find that having a mirror allows me to spot someone early making a jump from behind. It also
    allows me to discreetly assess the condition of the rider on my wheel, should I be looking for the
    right moment to make a break myself.
     
  13. Richard Ney

    Richard Ney Guest

    Peter Cole writes:

    >>> Can anyone share their experiences and/or make some recommendations?
    >>
    >> Yes. Learn to ride without the mirror; it's a crutch and, ultimately, a safety hazard, not a
    >> safety solution.
    >>
    >> Learning to listen and watch traffic, turn your head quickly to see behind you without swerving,
    >> and stay relaxed and nimble on the bike will save you in heavy traffic. I've had one bad accident
    >> cycling in Manhattan in the last 6 years (~ 10,000 miles annually) and it had nothing to do with
    >> traffic. Messengers here never use mirrors nor do any of my cycling friends. The only folks I
    >> ever see using the things are slow, unsteady riders that are severely lacking in basic bike
    >> handling skills. Chuck the mirror!
    >
    > I think mirrors work very well, particularly in urban environments, where there is a typically lot
    > of merging to be done. I use a mirror while cycling the same way I use one while driving. I don't
    > stare into it, only glance frequently to stay aware of traffic behind me. That way, merging around
    > potholes, double parked vehicles, etc. doesn't require a head check.

    As in driving a car, a "head check" is essential while cycling in traffic.

    > Many of the, even very experienced, riders I've seen can't do a head check without significant
    > weaving. Head checks use your peripheral vision (unless your head swivels like an owl's), which is
    > really pretty poor at anything other than motion detection. If you wear corrective lenses,
    > peripheral vision is often outside of the optical path, further degrading it.

    Motion or object detection is all that's required. I don't care if it's a yellow sedan or a gray
    SUV, I just care that something's there. A glance is all that's required.

    > I find a mirror much more useful in urban, rather than rural surroundings. Head checks are just
    > too slow to keep up with a rapidly changing environment. I prefer an eyeglass mounted mirror to a
    > helmet or handlebar mount. I've used "Third Eye" mirrors, but I don't like them much. Their ball
    > joint swivels loosen, and are bulky enough to get in the way with the inside of the helmet. As for
    > the "slow, unsteady, rider" thing, I'm not a racer, but I do a lot of fast club riding. In the
    > pace line, I find that having a mirror allows me to spot someone early making a jump from behind.
    > It also allows me to discreetly assess the condition of the rider on my wheel, should I be looking
    > for the right moment to make a break myself.

    I ride solo and in packs, in the suburbs, in the city and in rural areas when I vacation in Northern
    California. An ocassional glance, along with a sharp ear, keeps me well aprised of riders and cars
    in my vicinity. I believe that relying on mirrors to do this would ultimately result in degraded
    senses and put me in a [more] vulnerable position.
     
  14. "Richard Ney" <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected] 185212.news.dfncis.de:

    > I ride solo and in packs, in the suburbs, in the city and in rural areas when I vacation in
    > Northern California. An ocassional glance, along with a sharp ear, keeps me well aprised of riders
    > and cars in my vicinity. I believe that relying on mirrors to do this would ultimately result in
    > degraded senses and put me in a [more] vulnerable position.

    Amen. Not to mention, who would voluntarily have *real* glass (or in the worst case a long, metal
    'eye-remover') that close to their eyes? What happens if you crash?
    A: You're in a world of hurt.
     
  15. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    Why do you use mirrors in the car?

    On Tue, 15 Apr 2003 07:22:24 -0400, "Richard Ney" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The only folks I ever see using the things are slow, unsteady riders that are severely lacking in
    >basic bike handling skills. Chuck the mirror!
     
  16. Esmail Bonakdarian wrote:

    > For the longest time I have held on to my hardshell BELL helmet, primarily because it offers a
    > nice safe and sturdy way to attach a rear-view mirror.

    Been there, done that...

    > Last time I checked (I admit it's been a while), the newer helmets didn't seem to allow rear-view
    > mirrors to be attached in a nice stable way - is that still the case? I saw velcro and other
    > fairly "wobbly" arrangements.
    >
    > I have really come to depend on my helmet mirror over these many years, but this helmet is really
    > not safe any more so I'd like to get a new one, but one where I can mount a mirror that won't fall
    > off or get misadjusted all the time.

    I like and use the 3rd Eye "Pro" model. This is held on by adhesives, but, while their illustration
    shows it stuck to the outside of a helmet, it really works better stuck to the inside.

    They don't last forever, but they work quite well. I supplement the adhesive with clear
    packing tape.

    I would rather ride without my helmet than without my mirror.

    Once you get used to using a good helmet mirror, you'll find they actually work better than
    automobile mirrors.

    Sheldon "Retroviseur" Brown +-----------------------------------------------------------------+
    | This message has been sent to you using recycled electrons | exclusively. Please do not discard
    | them after use, | send them along and help conserve these irreplaceable | sub-atomic resources
    | for future generations. |
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    Massachusetts Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041 http://harriscyclery.com Hard-to-find parts
    shipped Worldwide http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  17. Matt Locker

    Matt Locker Guest

    --------------080301000802010704090502 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

    Richard:

    Do you pull your mirrors off your car too? No need to know what's behind you is there?

    I can hear cars coming up but generally not until they are there. If the day is windy I may not hear
    anything at all. WIth my mirror I always know the situation behind me. It's just another tool, sort
    of like clipless pedals, STI, helmets,..........................

    I'm a fan of the 3rd Eye mirror. It isn't perfect but the company will replace if for a small fee if
    it breaks, it is very adjustable & light, and easily adjustable.

    MOO, Matt

    Richard Ney wrote:

    >Esmail Bonakdarian writes:
    >
    >
    >
    >>For the longest time I have held on to my hardshell BELL helmet, primarily because it offers a
    >>nice safe and sturdy way to attach a rear-view mirror.
    >>
    >>Last time I checked (I admit it's been a while), the newer helmets didn't seem to allow rear-view
    >>mirrors to be attached in a nice stable way - is that still the case? I saw velcro and other
    >>fairly "wobbly" arrangements.
    >>
    >>I have really come to depend on my helmet mirror over these many years, but this helmet is really
    >>not safe any more so I'd like to get a new one, but one where I can mount a mirror that won't fall
    >>off or get misadjusted all the time.
    >>
    >>Can anyone share their experiences and/or make some recommendations?
    >>
    >>
    >
    >Yes. Learn to ride without the mirror; it's a crutch and, ultimately, a safety hazard, not a safety
    >solution.
    >
    >Learning to listen and watch traffic, turn your head quickly to see behind you without swerving,
    >and stay relaxed and nimble on the bike will save you in heavy traffic. I've had one bad accident
    >cycling in Manhattan in the last 6 years (~ 10,000 miles annually) and it had nothing to do with
    >traffic. Messengers here never use mirrors nor do any of my cycling friends. The only folks I ever
    >see using the things are slow, unsteady riders that are severely lacking in basic bike handling
    >skills. Chuck the mirror!
    >
    >
    >
    >

    --------------080301000802010704090502 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

    <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <title></title>
    </head> <body> Richard:<br> <br> Do you pull your mirrors off your car too? No need to know
    what's behind you is there? <br> <br> I can hear cars coming up but generally not until they are
    there. If the day is windy I may not hear anything at all. WIth my mirror I always know
    the situation behind me. It's just another tool, sort of like clipless pedals, STI,
    helmets,..........................<br> <br> I'm a fan of the 3rd Eye mirror. It isn't perfect
    but the company will replace if for a small fee if it breaks, it is very adjustable & light, and
    easily adjustable.<br> <br> MOO,<br> Matt<br> <br> Richard Ney wrote:<br> <blockquote type="cite"
    cite="[email protected]"> <pre wrap="">Esmail Bonakdarian writes:

    </pre> <blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap="">For the longest time I have held on to my hardshell
    BELL helmet, primarily because it offers a nice safe and sturdy way to attach a rear-view mirror.

    Last time I checked (I admit it's been a while), the newer helmets didn't seem to allow rear-view
    mirrors to be attached in a nice stable way - is that still the case? I saw velcro and other fairly
    "wobbly" arrangements.

    I have really come to depend on my helmet mirror over these many years, but this helmet is really
    not safe any more so I'd like to get a new one, but one where I can mount a mirror that won't fall
    off or get misadjusted all the time.

    Can anyone share their experiences and/or make some recommendations? </pre> </blockquote> <pre
    wrap=""><!----> Yes. Learn to ride without the mirror; it's a crutch and, ultimately, a safety
    hazard, not a safety solution.

    Learning to listen and watch traffic, turn your head quickly to see behind you without swerving, and
    stay relaxed and nimble on the bike will save you in heavy traffic. I've had one bad accident
    cycling in Manhattan in the last 6 years (~ 10,000 miles annually) and it had nothing to do with
    traffic. Messengers here never use mirrors nor do any of my cycling friends. The only folks I ever
    see using the things are slow, unsteady riders that are severely lacking in basic bike handling
    skills. Chuck the mirror!

    </pre> </blockquote> <br> </body> </html>

    --------------080301000802010704090502--
     
  18. On Tue, 15 Apr 2003 09:46:21 -0400, Peter Cole wrote:

    > Many of the, even very experienced, riders I've seen can't do a head check without significant
    > weaving. Head checks use your peripheral vision (unless your head swivels like an owl's), which is
    > really pretty poor at anything other than motion detection. If you wear corrective lenses,
    > peripheral vision is often outside of the optical path, further degrading it.

    Oh so true. And not all of us have such wonderful range of motion for head checks, either:
    osteoarthritis has this way of limiting it. Couple that with 20/400 peripheral vision, and a head
    check isn't worth much.
     
  19. On Tue, 15 Apr 2003 11:34:39 -0400, Paul Kopit wrote:

    > Why do you use mirrors in the car?
    >
    > On Tue, 15 Apr 2003 07:22:24 -0400, "Richard Ney" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>The only folks I ever see using the things are slow, unsteady riders that are severely lacking in
    >>basic bike handling skills. Chuck the mirror!

    Obviously, it's a crutch! ;-)
     
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