Helmets - mean time betweef failures

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by Andrew Price, Jan 3, 2006.

  1. Peter Keller wrote:

    >
    > I must own up to being a fscking quack. I have also bicycled reasonably
    > continuously for 50 years,


    So bicycle seats obviously haven't made you impotent either {:)

    > After all, fscking quacks have to believe their own propaganda, don't they?


    Personally I don't know how quacks survive the "propaganda" load they
    have to carry. Once had an IT contract that was really about maximising
    the "product" sent to quacks by drug companies.

    > Unfortunately, as a result of this, this fscking quack became vehemently
    > anti-compulsion within two months.


    Congrats. nice to hear it.

    Personally I prefer a nice floppy hat for shade to a hot helmet.
     


  2. Rayc wrote:

    > No its not, its about (if you believe helmets work), finding a
    > reasonable length of time between having bought a helmet and
    > purchasing a helmet, so as to have the most effective shock absorber (
    > again- if you believe in the process working)


    There are better shock absorbers than polystyrene, but that leaves out
    entirely the issue as to whether bicycle helmets do a a good job anyway.
    >
    > If you are going to wear a helmet, why not get it to do the best job it
    > can?


    You can not be seriously asking this question at this day and time. I
    still wear my old Bell helmet because;

    1) the current ones on offer to bicyclists are shit.
    2) my MSR is too friggin hot (great on cold winter nights though).
    3) no one produces a good helmet without poly,
    4) I don't want brand names littering my helmet,
    5) I don't want a helmet that looks like it was extruded through an anus.
     
  3. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On 2006-01-16, Terry Collins (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > Peter Keller wrote:
    >> I must own up to being a fscking quack. I have also bicycled reasonably
    >> continuously for 50 years,

    >
    > So bicycle seats obviously haven't made you impotent either {:)
    >
    >> After all, fscking quacks have to believe their own propaganda, don't they?

    >
    > Personally I don't know how quacks survive the "propaganda" load they
    > have to carry. Once had an IT contract that was really about maximising
    > the "product" sent to quacks by drug companies.


    Most of the GPs I have met didn't seem to have survived.

    I finally decided to experiment with non-bulk billing doctors to see
    if they were any better. This guy had a bit of a conflict of
    interest. His surgery dispensed awfully expensive vitamins and
    minerals and other quack herbal remedies, and I noticed that he was
    prescibing them to *all* of his patients. Whatever he could sting
    them for. I cancelled my next appointment with him last week. And
    blaming everything else on things missing in my diet[1][2].

    Still looking for a good doctor nearish to me -- Stuart pointed me to
    one that is a bit out of the way that I'm yet to get around to
    checking out.

    [1] My diet is perfectly fine (blood tests and all other tests have
    never come up with anything other than me being perfectly in the
    middle of the range). Although I do have to eat a lot to keep from
    "starving", and am still a skinny bugger who never has any energy. I
    just had to come to the realisation that some people are lucky enough
    to be inherently healthy despite a crap diet, and other people can be
    inherently unhealthy despite them trying to do all the right things.
    Dammit.
    [2] No, his 5 different suplements he had me taking that he thought I
    could potentially be lacking had absolutely no effect on me. And no,
    most people in Australia already get enough protein in their diet.
    The way of fixing fatigue is not to remove(!) carbohydrates from the
    diet and replace them with excess protein the body can't use.

    --
    TimC
    "You can't trust any bugger further than you can
    throw him, and there's nothing you can do about it,
    so let's have a drink." -- Terry Pratchett
     
  4. Peter Keller

    Peter Keller Guest

    On Mon, 16 Jan 2006 19:57:03 +1100, Terry Collins wrote:

    > Peter Keller wrote:
    >
    >
    > Personally I don't know how quacks survive the "propaganda" load they
    > have to carry. Once had an IT contract that was really about maximising
    > the "product" sent to quacks by drug companies.
    >
    >> Unfortunately, as a result of this, this fscking quack became vehemently
    >> anti-compulsion within two months.

    >
    > Congrats. nice to hear it.


    Thank you
    >
    > Personally I prefer a nice floppy hat for shade to a hot helmet.


    Me too. And they can also be made brightly colored for visiblity, and
    give nearly as much protection against scrapes and bruises as a helmet!

    Peter

    --
    No Microsoft involved. Certified virus free --
     
  5. Peter Keller

    Peter Keller Guest

    On Mon, 16 Jan 2006 09:22:36 +0000, TimC wrote:

    > On 2006-01-16, Terry Collins (aka Bruce)


    >>
    >> Personally I don't know how quacks survive the "propaganda" load they
    >> have to carry. Once had an IT contract that was really about maximising
    >> the "product" sent to quacks by drug companies.

    >
    > Most of the GPs I have met didn't seem to have survived.
    >
    > I finally decided to experiment with non-bulk billing doctors to see
    > if they were any better. This guy had a bit of a conflict of
    > interest. His surgery dispensed awfully expensive vitamins and
    > minerals and other quack herbal remedies, and I noticed that he was
    > prescibing them to *all* of his patients. Whatever he could sting
    > them for. I cancelled my next appointment with him last week. And
    > blaming everything else on things missing in my diet[1][2].
    >
    > Still looking for a good doctor nearish to me -- Stuart pointed me to
    > one that is a bit out of the way that I'm yet to get around to
    > checking out.
    >
    > [1] My diet is perfectly fine (blood tests and all other tests have
    > never come up with anything other than me being perfectly in the
    > middle of the range). Although I do have to eat a lot to keep from
    > "starving", and am still a skinny bugger who never has any energy. I
    > just had to come to the realisation that some people are lucky enough
    > to be inherently healthy despite a crap diet, and other people can be
    > inherently unhealthy despite them trying to do all the right things.
    > Dammit.
    > [2] No, his 5 different suplements he had me taking that he thought I
    > could potentially be lacking had absolutely no effect on me. And no,
    > most people in Australia already get enough protein in their diet.
    > The way of fixing fatigue is not to remove(!) carbohydrates from the
    > diet and replace them with excess protein the body can't use.


    Now there is a Fscking Quack!
    I agree that an active person does not have to watch much what s/he eats,
    as long as s/he gets enough and a reasonable variety. Also that
    supplements are by and large un-necessary, except perhaps for extreme
    things like bodybuilding.
    Oh what some FQ's (and others) will do for money!

    Peter
    --
    No Microsoft involved. Certified virus free --
     
  6. dave

    dave Guest

    TimC wrote:
    > On 2006-01-16, Terry Collins (aka Bruce)
    > was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    >
    >>Peter Keller wrote:
    >>
    >>>I must own up to being a fscking quack. I have also bicycled reasonably
    >>>continuously for 50 years,

    >>
    >>So bicycle seats obviously haven't made you impotent either {:)
    >>
    >>
    >>>After all, fscking quacks have to believe their own propaganda, don't they?

    >>
    >>Personally I don't know how quacks survive the "propaganda" load they
    >>have to carry. Once had an IT contract that was really about maximising
    >>the "product" sent to quacks by drug companies.

    >
    >
    > Most of the GPs I have met didn't seem to have survived.
    >
    > I finally decided to experiment with non-bulk billing doctors to see
    > if they were any better. This guy had a bit of a conflict of
    > interest. His surgery dispensed awfully expensive vitamins and
    > minerals and other quack herbal remedies, and I noticed that he was
    > prescibing them to *all* of his patients. Whatever he could sting
    > them for. I cancelled my next appointment with him last week. And
    > blaming everything else on things missing in my diet[1][2].
    >
    > Still looking for a good doctor nearish to me -- Stuart pointed me to
    > one that is a bit out of the way that I'm yet to get around to
    > checking out.
    >
    > [1] My diet is perfectly fine (blood tests and all other tests have
    > never come up with anything other than me being perfectly in the
    > middle of the range). Although I do have to eat a lot to keep from
    > "starving", and am still a skinny bugger who never has any energy. I
    > just had to come to the realisation that some people are lucky enough
    > to be inherently healthy despite a crap diet, and other people can be
    > inherently unhealthy despite them trying to do all the right things.
    > Dammit.
    > [2] No, his 5 different suplements he had me taking that he thought I
    > could potentially be lacking had absolutely no effect on me. And no,
    > most people in Australia already get enough protein in their diet.
    > The way of fixing fatigue is not to remove(!) carbohydrates from the
    > diet and replace them with excess protein the body can't use.
    >

    You could try Kris Merideth-Cooke. around the corner from my place Tim.
    Although we had a bit of a tiff and are no longer talking I think she
    is a fine sports doctor and a pretty decent cyclist

    Dave
     
  7. Random Data

    Random Data Guest

    On Mon, 16 Jan 2006 22:44:02 +1300, Peter Keller wrote:

    > Also that supplements are by and large un-necessary, except perhaps for
    > extreme things like bodybuilding.


    It depends on your definition of "supplement". I know I used to do active
    stuff for hours on end no matter how hot it was, and only drank
    Coke/OJ/cordial when I was a kid. But I also know I feel crap if I ride
    for 4 hours on just water, and Gatorade, etc. makes me feel better.
    Cordial doesn't have the same effect, so it's presumably the salts [1],
    and I'm fairly sure the bottle describes it as a "sports supplement drink"
    or similar.

    I don't think a daily vitamin tablet will do me much good. Then again, I
    tend to spend more at the fruit shop than the supermarket on a fairly
    regular basis.

    [1] Doesn't electrolyte sound better for you than "salt".

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    Striker, listen, and you listen close: flying a plane is no different
    than riding a bicycle just a lot harder to put baseball cards in the
    spokes.
     
  8. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On 2006-01-16, dave (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > TimC wrote:

    ....
    >> [2] No, his 5 different suplements he had me taking that he thought I
    >> could potentially be lacking had absolutely no effect on me. And no,
    >> most people in Australia already get enough protein in their diet.
    >> The way of fixing fatigue is not to remove(!) carbohydrates from the
    >> diet and replace them with excess protein the body can't use.
    >>

    > You could try Kris Merideth-Cooke. around the corner from my place Tim.
    > Although we had a bit of a tiff and are no longer talking I think she
    > is a fine sports doctor and a pretty decent cyclist


    Sports docs wouldn't come under medicare, would they?

    --
    TimC
    There are running jobs. Why don't you go chase them?
     
  9. dave

    dave Guest

    TimC wrote:
    > On 2006-01-16, dave (aka Bruce)
    > was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    >
    >>TimC wrote:

    >
    > ...
    >
    >>>[2] No, his 5 different suplements he had me taking that he thought I
    >>>could potentially be lacking had absolutely no effect on me. And no,
    >>>most people in Australia already get enough protein in their diet.
    >>>The way of fixing fatigue is not to remove(!) carbohydrates from the
    >>>diet and replace them with excess protein the body can't use.
    >>>

    >>
    >>You could try Kris Merideth-Cooke. around the corner from my place Tim.
    >> Although we had a bit of a tiff and are no longer talking I think she
    >>is a fine sports doctor and a pretty decent cyclist

    >
    >
    > Sports docs wouldn't come under medicare, would they?
    >


    Sheesh I dunno. She advertises as a GP. Hell give her a ring . Its
    Malvern rood the other side of Toronga from us. At the back of the
    CHemist. I wont give you her mobile (seems rude) and I have no idea
    what the clinics number is. SHe is basically honest.

    Dave
     
  10. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On 2006-01-16, dave (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > TimC wrote:
    >> Sports docs wouldn't come under medicare, would they?

    > Sheesh I dunno. She advertises as a GP. Hell give her a ring . Its
    > Malvern rood the other side of Toronga from us. At the back of the
    > CHemist. I wont give you her mobile (seems rude) and I have no idea
    > what the clinics number is. SHe is basically honest.


    Thanks.

    --
    TimC
    Hell - n. The current residence of Mr. Noah Webster, Lexicographer.
    (Ambrose Bierce, _The Devil's Dictionary_)
     
  11. Peter Keller wrote:

    >>Personally I prefer a nice floppy hat for shade to a hot helmet.

    >
    >
    > Me too. And they can also be made brightly colored for visiblity, and
    > give nearly as much protection against scrapes and bruises as a helmet!


    :)-).

    Visibility; in the 70's "Why do you wear that bright purple shirt when
    you tour?" Haven't you noticed the way every car looks as they go past?

    The real truth was that as a poor student, it is was the cheapest long
    sleeve cotton shirt I could get hold of. Wore the apricot out first,
    then had to wear the purple. King Gee shorts and topped off with large
    floppy cotton hat like the kids now wear to school.

    Hey, I just realised that whenever I had my floppy hat on, peeps were
    always offering free, cold beers. Never had an offer since I've been
    forced to wear my helmet.
     
  12. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    TimC wrote:
    > Theo Bekkers wrote


    >> Did you hear the comment from one of the survivors of the Egyptian
    >> bus crash? "Yes I knew the bus was fitted with seat-belts but no-one
    >> else was wearing them and I didn't want to look like a woose".


    > I can't quite remember -- was he the cop? If so, what a wonderful
    > message.


    I think they were all cops.

    Theo
     
  13. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    Peter Keller wrote:

    > Oh what some FQ's (and others) will do for money!


    There's a town in WA called Goomalling. In the 50s and 60s they had a FQ who
    believed that an appendix was a very bad thing to have, and was the cause of
    any and all ailments. By the mid 60s every person in town had had their
    appendix removed, some twice.

    Theo
     
  14. Peter Keller

    Peter Keller Guest

    On Mon, 16 Jan 2006 23:00:00 +1100, Random Data wrote:


    >
    > [1] Doesn't electrolyte sound better for you than "salt".


    It sounds better, but is wrong. An electrolyte is a substance, mixture or
    solution which conducts electricity and is decomposed by the passage of
    said electricity. 'Salts' is (are) the correct term for what you
    describe, that is substances which when dissolved dissociate into positive
    and negative ions.

    Peter.

    --
    No Microsoft involved. Certified virus free --
     
  15. Peter Keller

    Peter Keller Guest

    On Tue, 17 Jan 2006 09:42:47 +0800, Theo Bekkers wrote:

    > Peter Keller wrote:
    >
    >> Oh what some FQ's (and others) will do for money!

    >
    > There's a town in WA called Goomalling. In the 50s and 60s they had a FQ who
    > believed that an appendix was a very bad thing to have, and was the cause of
    > any and all ailments. By the mid 60s every person in town had had their
    > appendix removed, some twice.
    >
    > Theo


    I can quite believe it. A FQ like that can find appendixes (appendices?)
    everywhere!

    Peter

    --
    No Microsoft involved. Certified virus free --
     
  16. Random Data

    Random Data Guest

    On Tue, 17 Jan 2006 19:31:04 +1300, Peter Keller wrote:

    > It sounds better, but is wrong.


    In practical terms, the electrolytes in Gatorade, etc. are dissolved
    potassium chloride and sodium chloride. The addition of a soluble salt to
    water makes it an electrolyte, but the marketing blurb treats only the
    salts themselves as the electrolyte.

    --
    Dave Hughes | [email protected]
    "SCSI is *not* magic. There are fundamental technical reasons why it is
    necessary to sacrifice a young goat to your SCSI chain now and then."
    - Daniel M. Drucker
     
  17. Peter Keller

    Peter Keller Guest

    On Tue, 17 Jan 2006 21:13:43 +1100, Random Data wrote:

    The addition of a soluble salt to
    > water makes it an electrolyte, but the marketing blurb treats only the
    > salts themselves as the electrolyte.


    ok. I stand corrected.
    Oh these marketeers!

    Peter

    --
    No Microsoft involved. Certified virus free --
     
  18. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    Peter Keller wrote:
    > Random Data wrote:


    >> [1] Doesn't electrolyte sound better for you than "salt".


    > It sounds better, but is wrong. An electrolyte is a substance,
    > mixture or solution which conducts electricity and is decomposed by
    > the passage of said electricity. 'Salts' is (are) the correct term
    > for what you describe, that is substances which when dissolved
    > dissociate into positive and negative ions.


    Salt solution is an electrolyte, but electrolyte is not a salt solution. The
    liquid in your car battery is an electrolyte, don't put it in your water
    bottle.

    Theo
     
  19. Theo Bekkers

    Theo Bekkers Guest

    Peter Keller wrote:
    > On Tue, 17 Jan 2006 09:42:47 +0800, Theo Bekkers wrote:


    >> By the mid 60s every person
    >> in town had had their appendix removed, some twice.


    > I can quite believe it. A FQ like that can find appendixes
    > (appendices?) everywhere!


    I'll bet he had an anaesthetist as an accomplice. :)

    Theo
     
  20. TimC

    TimC Guest

    On 2006-01-17, Theo Bekkers (aka Bruce)
    was almost, but not quite, entirely unlike tea:
    > Peter Keller wrote:
    >> Random Data wrote:

    >
    >>> [1] Doesn't electrolyte sound better for you than "salt".

    >
    >> It sounds better, but is wrong. An electrolyte is a substance,
    >> mixture or solution which conducts electricity and is decomposed by
    >> the passage of said electricity. 'Salts' is (are) the correct term
    >> for what you describe, that is substances which when dissolved
    >> dissociate into positive and negative ions.

    >
    > Salt solution is an electrolyte, but electrolyte is not a salt solution. The
    > liquid in your car battery is an electrolyte, don't put it in your water
    > bottle.


    Mmmm, tangy.

    --
    TimC
    There are two ways to write error-free programs; only the third one works.
     
Loading...
Loading...