Help building a '95 Fuji Team from frame up



wildgunman

New Member
Sep 1, 2007
3
0
0
I'm a tall guy and I always had trouble finding a bicycle that would fit me and wouldn't be a complete compromise on what I wanted. So I recently bought a nice steel 95 Fuji Team bicycle frame and a carbon fork. I have no other components right now save for the fork. I've never built a bike before, and never gone out and bought components before.

I want the bike to operate as a solid daily commuter bike and maybe use it for some day touring, but it doesn't have to be race quality by any means and weight is, obviously from my choice of frame, not a big concern.

I want to get some advice on how to go about purchasing a build kit for the thing. I can assemble it myself at our local yellow bike project or I can just pay one of the gazillion bike shops around to build it, I don't really care. Mainly I just need to know everything I need to buy and what route I should go.

I'd like to buy a used groupset, just because its way cheaper and I don't need a new group. I don't want to spend more than $1000 (way less preferably, but I'm realistic), and frankly, I want components (wheels especially) that are decent but don't look so flashy that the bike screams "steal me" every time I lock it up outside for a few of hours. That said, I'd prefer an STI or Ergolever style shifter over the downtube shifters the frame is designed for, just because it makes commuting much less painful.

I need to know what I need, top to bottom, and what the best rout for purchasing it would be, and what problems I should watch out for. Any advice?

Keep in mind that I am mechanically inclined and have a friend who is an experienced bike mechanic, but am somewhat of a neophite when it comes to bike building.

http://airfreetires.com/Specs/Step5.asp?BikeId=22001&Brand=Fuji&Model=Team&Year=1995
 

alfeng

Well-Known Member
Jul 23, 2005
6,723
254
63
wildgunman said:
I'm a tall guy and I always had trouble finding a bicycle that would fit me and wouldn't be a complete compromise on what I wanted. So I recently bought a nice steel 95 Fuji Team bicycle frame and a carbon fork. I have no other components right now save for the fork. I've never built a bike before, and never gone out and bought components before.

I want the bike to operate as a solid daily commuter bike and maybe use it for some day touring, but it doesn't have to be race quality by any means and weight is, obviously from my choice of frame, not a big concern.

I want to get some advice on how to go about purchasing a build kit for the thing. I can assemble it myself at our local yellow bike project or I can just pay one of the gazillion bike shops around to build it, I don't really care. Mainly I just need to know everything I need to buy and what route I should go.

I'd like to buy a used groupset, just because its way cheaper and I don't need a new group. I don't want to spend more than $1000 (way less preferably, but I'm realistic), and frankly, I want components (wheels especially) that are decent but don't look so flashy that the bike screams "steal me" every time I lock it up outside for a few of hours. That said, I'd prefer an STI or Ergolever style shifter over the downtube shifters the frame is designed for, just because it makes commuting much less painful.

I need to know what I need, top to bottom, and what the best rout for purchasing it would be, and what problems I should watch out for. Any advice?

Keep in mind that I am mechanically inclined and have a friend who is an experienced bike mechanic, but am somewhat of a neophite when it comes to bike building.

http://airfreetires.com/Specs/Step5.asp?BikeId=22001&Brand=Fuji&Model=Team&Year=1995
A Campagnolo Centaur/Veloce group will be the best value -- should be under $500 if you shop around -- pre-2007/pre-QS shifters are considered better for the Centaur/Veloce/Mirage groups. Spec 175mm cranks. Cables & housing will come with the "group" ... and, are often bundled WITH Campy shifters.

If you aren't in a hurry (i.e., bought a la carte off of eBay), you can definitely get the "group" for under $500US.

You'll probably want a 130mm (or, longer) stem since the top tube only appears to be 56cm.

44cm (c-c) handlebars ... or, wider! Be certain that the stem & handlebars are compatible (i.e., both OS/31.8, or not).

Handlebar tape.

A 26.8 seatpost, of course (presuming the specs are correct) ... longer (as in 300mm) is better. Possibly, an Easton EA50 which has greater setback than most posts ... otherwise, whatever fits your budget.

A saddle of your choice.

Wheels are really whatever you want -- "standard" 32h wheels with Shimano compatible hubs can be used with Campy drivetrains ... you just need either a "conversion" cassette (for 10-speed) or the willingness to do some fiddling.

BTW. Most Pro Team riders train on standard 32h wheels.

Pedals of your choice.
 

robsurge

New Member
Feb 5, 2004
13
0
0
Nothing really wrong with down tube shifters if your on budget or don't want additional "bling". They are completely functional and require much less maintenance than these elaborate sti/ergo designs. They take about a minute to install/adjust (as fast as you can tighten a cable) and are reliable as all hell. Nothing wrong with the new design either but it just pisses me off that I am forced into using them on many of the newer frames.