Help: chicken stock question

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Tom, Jan 24, 2004.

  1. Tom

    Tom Guest

    I am currently making chicken stock and am wondering about the ratio of chicken to water. My book
    says 1 gallon of water to 8lbs of meaty chicken bones. I tried two different stores and neither of
    them fabricate their chicken products, so they don't have any bones. What I did was buy a whole bird
    (around 4lbs on sale for 1.29/lb) skinned it, cut it into about 6 pieces and covered it with 1/2
    gallon of water. My question is... since I'm using a whole bird, with a lot more meat than the
    "meaty bones" the recipe calls for, can I add more water to the pot to get more stock out of this
    batch without diluting the flavor too much?

    Thanks, Tom
     
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  2. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Tom wrote:
    > I am currently making chicken stock and am wondering about the ratio of chicken to water. My book
    > says 1 gallon of water to 8lbs of meaty chicken bones. I tried two different stores and neither of
    > them fabricate their chicken products, so they don't have any bones. What I did was buy a whole
    > bird (around 4lbs on sale for 1.29/lb) skinned it, cut it into about 6 pieces and covered it with
    > 1/2 gallon of water. My question is... since I'm using a whole bird, with a lot more meat than the
    > "meaty bones" the recipe calls for, can I add more water to the pot to get more stock out of this
    > batch without diluting the flavor too much?
    >
    > Thanks, Tom

    Don't rely so much on the recipe. If you've covered the bird well with water you'll do fine. Now,
    add something to it. A quartered onion, some celery, carrots and a bay leaf and peppercorns would be
    a good addition. Cook it down until the bird is starting to fall off the bones. Scoop out the bird
    and save the cooked chicken for something like chicken soup, chicken & dumplings, chicken a la king.
    Continue cooking the stock until it is reduced by half. Then skim out the veggies and let it cool.
    Then put it in the refrigerator. If properly done, it will gel over night. You may need to scoop fat
    off the top, but the resulting stock will be very nice!

    Jill
     
  3. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Tom wrote:
    > > I am currently making chicken stock and am wondering about the ratio of chicken to water. My
    > > book says 1 gallon of water to 8lbs of meaty chicken bones. I tried two different stores and
    > > neither of them fabricate their chicken products, so they don't have any bones. What I did was
    > > buy a whole bird (around 4lbs on sale for 1.29/lb) skinned it, cut it into about 6 pieces and
    > > covered it with 1/2 gallon of water. My question is... since I'm using a whole bird, with a lot
    > > more meat than the "meaty bones" the recipe calls for, can I add more water to the pot to get
    > > more stock out of this batch without diluting the flavor too much?
    > >
    > > Thanks, Tom
    >
    > Don't rely so much on the recipe. If you've covered the bird well with water you'll do fine. Now,
    > add something to it. A quartered onion, some celery, carrots and a bay leaf and peppercorns would
    > be a good addition. Cook it down until the bird is starting to fall off the bones. Scoop out the
    > bird and save the cooked chicken for something like chicken soup, chicken & dumplings, chicken a
    > la king. Continue cooking the stock until
    it
    > is reduced by half. Then skim out the veggies and let it cool. Then put
    it
    > in the refrigerator. If properly done, it will gel over night. You may need to scoop fat off the
    > top, but the resulting stock will be very nice!
    >
    > Jill
    >

    I think Jill's on the right track. Let me add a few things. In my experience, adding enough water to
    just cover the bird (and onion, etc) is just about right. A couple of whole cloves is a nice
    addition. There are two approaches to timing. You can cook it until the meat is just cooked (30-40
    minutes) then remove the meat and use it for other purposes, return the bones and scraps and simmer
    for another hour or so. For the best stock, however, leave the meat in the pot for the entire
    cooking period. At this point the flavor in the meat will almost all be in the stock and the meat is
    not very good and can be thrown away (although your cat or dog might like it).

    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  4. Hahabogus

    Hahabogus Guest

    "Tom" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I am currently making chicken stock and am wondering about the ratio of chicken to water. My book
    > says 1 gallon of water to 8lbs of meaty chicken bones. I tried two different stores and neither of
    > them fabricate their chicken products, so they don't have any bones. What I did was buy a whole
    > bird (around 4lbs on sale for 1.29/lb) skinned it, cut it into about 6 pieces and covered it with
    > 1/2 gallon of water. My question is... since I'm using a whole bird, with a lot more meat than the
    > "meaty bones" the recipe calls for, can I add more water to the pot to get more stock out of this
    > batch without diluting the flavor too much?
    >
    > Thanks, Tom
    >
    >
    >

    Another way to go, if you have freezer space, is to save up the boney bits like chicken necks, the
    ends off of the wings, the chicken backs, etc... When you have enough of those make stock from them.
    Seasoning with things like celery, onions, carrots, parsnip and the addtion of herbs and
    spices...other than salt make for a flavorful stock. Because the chicken stock will be reduces
    and/or used in other things salting to taste early can make the finished product too salty.

    --
    Once during Prohibition I was forced to live for days on nothing but food and water.
    --------
    FIELDS, W. C.
     
  5. On Sat, 24 Jan 2004 21:00:08 GMT, "Tom" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I am currently making chicken stock and am wondering about the ratio of chicken to water. My book
    >says 1 gallon of water to 8lbs of meaty chicken bones. I tried two different stores and neither of
    >them fabricate their chicken products, so they don't have any bones. What I did was buy a whole
    >bird (around 4lbs on sale for 1.29/lb) skinned it, cut it into about 6 pieces and covered it with
    >1/2 gallon of water. My question is... since I'm using a whole bird, with a lot more meat than the
    >"meaty bones" the recipe calls for, can I add more water to the pot to get more stock out of this
    >batch without diluting the flavor too much?
    >
    When I make stock, whether from a whole soup chicken (retired egg-layer) or carcass, I use enough
    water to cover the bones and vegetables. It can be diluted later if you want, but it is easier IMHO
    to deal with concentrated stock than thin. It is also easier to store.

    I often roast the bones in a hot oven first, to make a browner stock.

    BTW, the carcass from a roast pheasant makes a really nice stock--thick and gelatinous compared to
    chicken. I don't know why, since it doesn't have the feet on it. Duck carcasses work well
    flavorwise, but don't make a lot of gelatin.

    Rodney Myrvaagnes NYC J36 Gjo/a

    "Wanting to meet a writer because you like his work is like wanting to meet a duck because you like
    pate." Margaret Atwood
     
  6. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Sat, 24 Jan 2004 21:00:08 GMT, "Tom" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I am currently making chicken stock and am wondering about the ratio of chicken to water. My
    >book says...

    "Water to cover" the stuff in the pot is the usual prescription. You didn't mention veg, which are
    usually standard ingredients: chunks of carrot, celery, onion, and (my favorite) chopped leeks.
    Pepper, herbs of choice (parsley, thyme).

    > My question is... since I'm using a whole bird, with a lot more meat than the "meaty bones" the
    > recipe calls for, can I add more water to the pot to get more stock out of this batch without
    > diluting the flavor too much?

    I usually use scraps and bones, which make a fairly tasty broth/stock. For storage purposes, boiling
    down the stock (after straining and skimming fat) is useful to make a concentrate. You can always
    extend with water afterward. This is one reason not to add salt to the original broth, but when it's
    used in the final dish. Unless you're making a batch of stock to use right this minute in a specific
    dish, I'd skip extra water.
     
  7. Tom

    Tom Guest

    "Tom" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I am currently making chicken stock and am wondering about the ratio of chicken to water. My book
    > says 1 gallon of water to 8lbs of meaty chicken bones. I tried two different stores and neither of
    > them fabricate their chicken products, so they don't have any bones. What I did was buy a
    whole
    > bird (around 4lbs on sale for 1.29/lb) skinned it, cut it into about 6 pieces and covered it with
    > 1/2 gallon of water. My question is... since
    I'm
    > using a whole bird, with a lot more meat than the "meaty bones" the recipe calls for, can I add
    > more water to the pot to get more stock out of this batch without diluting the flavor too much?
    >
    > Thanks, Tom
    >
    >

    Thanks for the help folks, the broth is now cooling. I did not put in any extra water and added
    mirepoix, garlic, peppercorns, thyme, parsely and a bay leaf an hour before the end. It turned out
    great. I plan on attempting a consomme and veloute sauce with it in the next day or two.

    Tom
     
  8. -L.

    -L. Guest

    "Tom" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I am currently making chicken stock and am wondering about the ratio of chicken to water. My book
    > says 1 gallon of water to 8lbs of meaty chicken bones. I tried two different stores and neither of
    > them fabricate their chicken products, so they don't have any bones. What I did was buy a whole
    > bird (around 4lbs on sale for 1.29/lb) skinned it, cut it into about 6 pieces and covered it with
    > 1/2 gallon of water. My question is... since I'm using a whole bird, with a lot more meat than the
    > "meaty bones" the recipe calls for, can I add more water to the pot to get more stock out of this
    > batch without diluting the flavor too much?
    >
    > Thanks, Tom

    I cut my chicken up into pieces and roast in a roasting pan, covered
    1/3 with water, which would be about 4 cups or so. makes awesome stock. I personally don't see the
    point in diluted stock. I make mine very hearty.

    -L.
     
  9. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Sat, 24 Jan 2004 22:53:57 GMT, hahabogus
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Another way to go, if you have freezer space, is to save up the boney bits like chicken necks,
    > the ends off of the wings, the chicken backs, etc...

    I go even further and debone the carcass. I make boneless breasts a fact of life and sometimes even
    boneless thighs & legs if I want to hurry up the acquisition process.

    I'm not above saving the carcass of a fully cooked whole chicken (store bought or kitchen made)
    after the meat has been sliced off it.

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  10. Sf

    Sf Guest

    On Sat, 24 Jan 2004 18:08:33 -0500, Rodney Myrvaagnes
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > I often roast the bones in a hot oven first, to make a browner stock.

    Good move! Browning the vegetables is also good. Of course, timing is everything. =)
    >
    > BTW, the carcass from a roast pheasant makes a really nice stock--thick and gelatinous compared
    > to chicken. I don't know why, since it doesn't have the feet on it. Duck carcasses work well
    > flavorwise, but don't make a lot of gelatin.

    Veal has been out of favor where I live for years. Long, long ago, I was able to buy veal backbone
    or shank to brown along with everything else for my stock. My "rich" stock had beef, veal & chicken
    when I was able to do that.

    Now, I don't make a "rich" stock. It's all chicken, all the time - unless I'm gearing up to make
    French Onion Soup, of course... then I'll add a couple of roasted beef bones.

    <S>

    Practice safe eating - always use condiments
     
  11. Saerah

    Saerah Guest

    sf wrote in message ...
    >On Sat, 24 Jan 2004 22:53:57 GMT, hahabogus <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Another way to go, if you have freezer space, is to save up the boney
    bits
    >> like chicken necks, the ends off of the wings, the chicken backs, etc...
    >
    >I go even further and debone the carcass. I make boneless breasts a fact of life and sometimes even
    >boneless thighs & legs if I want to hurry up the acquisition process.
    >
    >I'm not above saving the carcass of a fully cooked whole chicken (store bought or kitchen made)
    >after the meat has been sliced off it.

    that is what i make my chicken stock out of. waste not, want not, right? my husband is happy when i
    buy a whole chicken, because that means we have roast chicken, chicken pot pie and at least 2 kinds
    of soup made from chicken stock that week. :)

    --
    Saerah

    TANSTAAFL

    Hangovers only last a day, but a good drinking story lives on forever....
     
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