help identify chain rings please

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Michael Green, Jan 29, 2003.

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  1. My chainrings are knackered. But what are they? Shimano, triple, no name (other than Shimano) on
    rings. Bike has Exage brakes, downtube levers are marked SIS. The only unusual feature is a smooth
    ring outside the large ring to prevent your leg coverings getting 'bitten'. Bike is Dawes Comp. Giro
    200 3-4 years old. Any help or advice welcomed. Thanks.
     
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  2. > My chainrings are knackered. But what are they? Shimano, triple, no name (other than Shimano) on
    > rings. Bike has Exage brakes, downtube levers are marked SIS. The only unusual feature is a smooth
    > ring outside the large ring to prevent your leg coverings getting 'bitten'. Bike is Dawes Comp.
    > Giro 200 3-4 years old. Any help or advice welcomed. Thanks.

    Do you mean 13-14 years old, not 3-4? If the exage equipment is original, that bike is more than 10
    years old. Sounds like all Exage equipment, but not sure of the bolt pattern for the chainrings.
    Just bring them in to your local shop, they'll quite possibly have something in stock that fits.
    Since it's downtube shifting, you don't need really fancy chainrings up front, so they shouldn't be
    too expensive. Aftermarket versions will do just fine.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReaction.com
     
  3. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    "Michael Green" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My chainrings are knackered. But what are they? Shimano, triple, no name (other than Shimano) on
    > rings. Bike has Exage brakes, downtube levers are marked SIS. The only unusual feature is a smooth
    > ring outside the large ring to prevent your leg coverings getting 'bitten'. Bike is Dawes Comp.
    > Giro 200 3-4 years old. Any help or advice welcomed.

    Please write back with the Shimano crank part number. It's stamped on the inside of the right arm
    and begins with FC, such as FC-M480 or FC-MC20. Shimano is rigorously thorough with this nice
    thoughtful feature.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  4. "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > "Michael Green" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > My chainrings are knackered. But what are they? Shimano, triple, no name (other than Shimano) on
    > > rings. Bike has Exage brakes, downtube levers are marked SIS. The only unusual feature is a
    > > smooth ring outside the large ring to prevent your leg coverings getting 'bitten'. Bike is Dawes
    > > Comp. Giro 200 3-4 years old. Any help or advice welcomed.
    >
    > Please write back with the Shimano crank part number. It's stamped on the inside of the right arm
    > and begins with FC, such as FC-M480 or FC-MC20. Shimano is rigorously thorough with this nice
    > thoughtful feature.

    It looks like FG TY30. And yes 3-4 years old. Bought new by me from Dawes dealer.
     
  5. > It looks like FG TY30. And yes 3-4 years old. Bought new by me from Dawes
    dealer.

    Very interesting. Exage hasn't been around for years (unless it's something they sell in the UK and
    not in the US?). How many cogs in the rear?

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com

    "Michael Green" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > "Michael Green" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > My chainrings are knackered. But what are they? Shimano, triple, no name (other than Shimano)
    > > > on rings. Bike has Exage brakes, downtube levers are marked SIS. The only unusual feature is a
    > > > smooth ring outside the large ring to prevent your leg coverings getting 'bitten'. Bike is
    > > > Dawes Comp. Giro 200 3-4 years old. Any help or advice welcomed.
    > >
    > > Please write back with the Shimano crank part number. It's stamped on
    the
    > > inside of the right arm and begins with FC, such as FC-M480 or FC-MC20. Shimano is rigorously
    > > thorough with this nice thoughtful feature.
    >
    > It looks like FG TY30. And yes 3-4 years old. Bought new by me from Dawes
    dealer.
     
  6. Pooh

    Pooh Guest

    I don't think it makes much diference. To find a replacement, you can measure the bolt hole
    diameter, the number of holes, number of teeth, and the position if sits in the crankset. Any good
    bike shop can get a replacement. Or just take it to the LBS, they probably have it in stock.

    Wynn

    [email protected] (Michael Green) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > "Michael Green" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > My chainrings are knackered. But what are they? Shimano, triple, no name (other than Shimano)
    > > > on rings. Bike has Exage brakes, downtube levers are marked SIS. The only unusual feature is a
    > > > smooth ring outside the large ring to prevent your leg coverings getting 'bitten'. Bike is
    > > > Dawes Comp. Giro 200 3-4 years old. Any help or advice welcomed.
    > >
    > > Please write back with the Shimano crank part number. It's stamped on the inside of the right
    > > arm and begins with FC, such as FC-M480 or FC-MC20. Shimano is rigorously thorough with this
    > > nice thoughtful feature.
    >
    > It looks like FG TY30. And yes 3-4 years old. Bought new by me from Dawes dealer.
     
  7. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Michael Green wrote:
    > My chainrings are knackered. But what are they? Shimano, triple, no name (other than Shimano) on
    > rings. Bike has Exage brakes, downtube levers are marked SIS. The only unusual feature is a smooth
    > ring outside the large ring to prevent your leg coverings getting 'bitten'. Bike is Dawes Comp.
    > Giro 200 3-4 years old.

    If I wanted to replace rings on that, I would wok out the BCD* then try Stronglight rings
    or similar.
    * See: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_bo-z.html

    According to the catalogue, the 1999 Dawes Giro 200 has a "Shimano TY30A Megarange 28-38-48 170mm
    crankset with guard" (and Exage brakes).

    As replacement rings are never cheap (when you have to buy all three), and it's a naff looking
    crankset anyway, what about replacing the whole thing? The crankset, I mean, not the bike!

    Have a browse through: http://www.settlecycles.co.uk/shop/ (best UK place for most chainrings, btw)
    and http://www.sjscycles.com/store/vIndex.htm

    Would need to make sure it's compatible with the (Shimano) bottom bracket.

    ~PB
     
  8. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > > "Michael Green" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > My chainrings are knackered. But what are they? Shimano, triple, no name (other than Shimano)
    > > > on rings. Bike has Exage brakes, downtube levers are marked SIS. The only unusual feature is a
    > > > smooth ring outside the large ring to prevent your leg coverings getting 'bitten'. Bike is
    > > > Dawes Comp. Giro 200 3-4 years old. Any help or advice welcomed.

    > "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > Please write back with the Shimano crank part number. It's stamped on
    the
    > > inside of the right arm and begins with FC, such as FC-M480 or FC-MC20. Shimano is rigorously
    > > thorough with this nice thoughtful feature.

    "Michael Green" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > It looks like FG TY30. And yes 3-4 years old. Bought new by me from Dawes
    dealer.

    That makes it easy!

    The Tourney crank you have is rivetted together and so none of the chainrings can be removed or
    changed. When you say"knackered" are you referring to the several teeth which are truncated and the
    slots and folds just beneath the teeth which look like a metal eating monster has chewed it? That's
    not a problem, it's a feature! Those things assist shifting. Stop at an LBS and peek at a similarly
    priced new bicycle's chainrings before you pursue this any further.

    We get telephone calls from week-old bicycle customers in a panic over those slots and folds.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  9. "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > "Michael Green" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > My chainrings are knackered. But what are they? Shimano, triple, no name (other than
    > > > > Shimano) on rings. Bike has Exage brakes, downtube levers are marked SIS. The only unusual
    > > > > feature is a smooth ring outside the large ring to prevent your leg coverings getting
    > > > > 'bitten'. Bike is Dawes Comp. Giro 200 3-4 years old. Any help or advice welcomed.
    >
    > > "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > Please write back with the Shimano crank part number. It's stamped on
    > the
    > > > inside of the right arm and begins with FC, such as FC-M480 or FC-MC20. Shimano is rigorously
    > > > thorough with this nice thoughtful feature.
    >
    >
    > "Michael Green" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > It looks like FG TY30. And yes 3-4 years old. Bought new by me from Dawes
    > dealer.
    >
    > That makes it easy!
    >
    > The Tourney crank you have is rivetted together and so none of the chainrings can be removed or
    > changed. When you say"knackered" are you referring to the several teeth which are truncated and
    > the slots and folds just beneath the teeth which look like a metal eating monster has chewed it?
    > That's not a problem, it's a feature! Those things assist shifting. Stop at an LBS and peek at a
    > similarly priced new bicycle's chainrings before you pursue this any further.
    >
    > We get telephone calls from week-old bicycle customers in a panic over those slots and folds.

    They are knackered, the pressure side of the teeth are very rounded, particularly on the
    granny ring.

    Rivetted eh? And here was me thinking the bolts were just diguised by the crud. Advice on
    replacement please! Thanks.
     
  10. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Michael Green wrote:
    > They are knackered, the pressure side of the teeth are very rounded, particularly on the
    > granny ring.

    Worn chainring teeth usually look pointy or shark-like, not rounded.

    Does the chain skip?

    ~PB
     
  11. > They are knackered, the pressure side of the teeth are very rounded, particularly on the
    > granny ring.

    Just to make sure, check out the chainring photos on this page-

    http://www.ChainReaction.com/chainrings.htm

    We get so many customers thinking their chainrings are defective on new bikes, we finally put up
    some photos showing what new chainrings actually look like. But since your bike is 3-4 years old,
    well, it would be unusual for them to be worn, but not impossible. In general, if you replace your
    chain when needed, chainrings will typically deliver between 8-15,000 miles of life before having to
    be replaced (higher quality chainrings may last longer, especially with proper drivetrain
    maintenance).

    As others have pointed out, your chainrings are riveted together, so you need to replace the entire
    assembly on that side. They're not all that expensive (typically less than the cost of three
    chainrings), but it's also an opportunity to upgrade to something different (with removable
    chainrings). Sometimes shops will have something decent & cheap that came off a new bike where a
    customer wanted something different. Just make sure you get an appropriate crank length.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  12. "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Michael Green wrote:
    > > They are knackered, the pressure side of the teeth are very rounded, particularly on the
    > > granny ring.
    >
    > Worn chainring teeth usually look pointy or shark-like, not rounded.
    >
    > Does the chain skip?
    >
    > ~PB

    Bad choice of words, the teeth do indeed look sharp and sharklike, and yes chain skips under
    pressure on the small.
     
  13. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > > > > "Michael Green" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > > > My chainrings are knackered. But what are they? Shimano, triple,
    no
    > > > > > name (other than Shimano) on rings. Bike has Exage brakes,
    downtube
    > > > > > levers are marked SIS. The only unusual feature is a smooth ring outside the large ring to
    > > > > > prevent your leg coverings getting
    'bitten'.
    > > > > > Bike is Dawes Comp. Giro 200 3-4 years old. Any help or advice welcomed.

    > > > "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:<[email protected]>...
    > > > > Please write back with the Shimano crank part number. It's stamped
    on
    > > the
    > > > > inside of the right arm and begins with FC, such as FC-M480 or
    FC-MC20.
    > > > > Shimano is rigorously thorough with this nice thoughtful feature.

    > > "Michael Green" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > It looks like FG TY30. And yes 3-4 years old. Bought new by me from
    Dawes
    > > dealer.

    > "A Muzi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > That makes it easy!

    > > The Tourney crank you have is rivetted together and so none of the chainrings can be removed or
    > > changed. When you say"knackered" are you referring to the several teeth which are truncated and
    > > the slots and
    folds
    > > just beneath the teeth which look like a metal eating monster has chewed
    it?
    > > That's not a problem, it's a feature! Those things assist shifting.
    Stop
    > > at an LBS and peek at a similarly priced new bicycle's chainrings before
    you
    > > pursue this any further.
    > >
    > > We get telephone calls from week-old bicycle customers in a panic over
    those
    > > slots and folds.

    "Michael Green" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > They are knackered, the pressure side of the teeth are very rounded, particularly on the
    > granny ring.
    >
    > Rivetted eh? And here was me thinking the bolts were just diguised by the crud. Advice on
    > replacement please! Thanks.

    In that case you'll need to buy a complete crank, often the same price for a right side as for the
    whole complete set. Here, that type of unit is $35~$40 complete - less than buying chainrings!

    If you intend to keep the bicycle a long while, if there are no impending major repairs and if you
    think you'll want custom gearing now or in the future, you might look at a more expensive crank that
    allows individual ring substitution. It's likely you'll have to change to a shorter crank bearing
    spindle ( "bottom bracket" assembly) so the entire operation will be quite a bit more at minimum.

    If you have no other complaints than the "knackered" ( quite a colorful word!) damage, just get the
    current model of your Tourney crank. Any LBS should have it and expect a five minute installation.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
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