Help - Lower back pain during run

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Andy Key, May 2, 2003.

  1. Andy Key

    Andy Key Guest

    Every time I go from the bike ride to the run stage in a tri, after about 5 minutes I get
    excruciating lower back pain. This normally lasts for the next half hour. I'm talking short distance
    up to Olympic length events, so 30-40K cycle then 8-10K run. I don't get back pain any other time -
    not while cycling, and not during a "normal" run (i.e. a run where I haven't been cycling first).
    I've never seen anyone else mention this problem in magazines or this newsgroup, so maybe it's just
    me! Any ideas on how to help this? Specific strengthening exercises? Changing my bike setup?

    Thanks

    Andy
    --
     
    Tags:


  2. ~Ironman~

    ~Ironman~ Guest

    Can you further elaborate the pain? Where exactly is it? Does it radiate to your legs? Is it
    aggrevated by any kind of movement? When and how does the pain subside? Any signs of inflammation
    afterward you find?

    "Andy Key" <[email protected]> ¦b¶l¥ó
    news:[email protected] ¤¤¼¶¼g...
    > Every time I go from the bike ride to the run stage in a tri, after about 5 minutes I get
    > excruciating lower back pain. This normally lasts for the next half hour. I'm talking short
    > distance up to Olympic length events, so 30-40K cycle then 8-10K run. I don't get back pain any
    > other time - not while cycling, and not during a "normal" run (i.e. a run where I haven't been
    > cycling first). I've never seen anyone else mention this problem in magazines or this newsgroup,
    > so maybe it's just me! Any ideas on how to help this? Specific strengthening exercises? Changing
    > my bike setup?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Andy
    > --
     
  3. Jim K.

    Jim K. Guest

    Andy,

    If stretching your back is not part of your morning ritual then it should be. You can find a lot of
    examples online of the various exercises that will stretch and strenghten your back. You might also
    want to look into doing some yoga.

    -Jim-

    "Andy Key" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Every time I go from the bike ride to the run stage in a tri, after about 5 minutes I get
    > excruciating lower back pain. This normally lasts for the next half hour. I'm talking short
    > distance up to Olympic length events, so 30-40K cycle then 8-10K run. I don't get back pain any
    > other time - not while cycling, and not during a "normal" run (i.e. a run where I haven't been
    > cycling first). I've never seen anyone else mention this problem in magazines or this newsgroup,
    > so maybe it's just me! Any ideas on how to help this? Specific strengthening exercises? Changing
    > my bike setup?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Andy
    > --
    >

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  4. Andy Key wrote:
    >
    > Every time I go from the bike ride to the run stage in a tri, after about 5 minutes I get
    > excruciating lower back pain. This normally lasts for the next half hour. I'm talking short
    > distance up to Olympic length events, so 30-40K cycle then 8-10K run. I don't get back pain any
    > other time - not while cycling, and not during a "normal" run (i.e. a run where I haven't been
    > cycling first). I've never seen anyone else mention this problem in magazines or this newsgroup,
    > so maybe it's just me! Any ideas on how to help this? Specific strengthening exercises? Changing
    > my bike setup?

    Try flexing your abs at the start of the run, just to wake them up. If holding your abs a little
    tighter helps with the back pain, consider doing some abdominal work.

    -S-
     
  5. Broooz

    Broooz Guest

    "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > Try flexing your abs at the start of the run, just to wake them up. If holding your abs a little
    > tighter helps with the back pain, consider doing some abdominal work.
    >
    Agree more or less with this although it is not the Abs but the muscles behind the Abs (core
    muscles). However, flexing the Abs will have the same effect. Also pull in the core muscles without
    flexing the Abs when in the drops and try to get a concave back - generally you see bikers with
    convex back but that is no good for your back. You can learn to focus on the core muscles all the
    time - these muscles are designed to be turned on a lot of the time. Note that if you try to do it
    with the Abs too, you will find they get tired quickly as they are designed for short term loads.

    Yoga was suggested as an exercise - worth trying or even better Pilates. Or, a good physio would
    give you some core strengthening back exercises.
     
  6. Broooz wrote:
    >
    > "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > Try flexing your abs at the start of the run, just to wake them up. If holding your abs a little
    > > tighter helps with the back pain, consider doing some abdominal work.
    > >
    > Agree more or less with this although it is not the Abs but the muscles behind the Abs (core
    > muscles). However, flexing the Abs will have the same effect. Also pull in the core muscles
    > without flexing the Abs when in the drops and try to get a concave back - generally you see
    > bikers with convex back but that is no good for your back. You can learn to focus on the core
    > muscles all the time - these muscles are designed to be turned on a lot of the time. Note that if
    > you try to do it with the Abs too, you will find they get tired quickly as they are designed for
    > short term loads.

    The rectus *ab*dominus, transverse *ab*dominus and other muscles *are* the core muscles. Perhaps I
    should have said to flex your stomach. When I say "flex" I do not mean "suck in" I mean as if
    bracing for a punch in the belly. It is well documented, e.g., the valsalva maneuver among weight
    lifters and martial artists, that pressurizing the abdomen protects the lumbar spine. Giving your
    tummy muscles a little squeeze is the easiest way to find out if this is an issue. If you prefer to
    flex the transverse and not the rectus admoninus, fine with me.

    In endurance exercise, one cannot operate under constant high abdominal pressure but regular
    abdominal - core, if you prefer - exercise, along with some practice at pressurizing the midsection
    - neither yoga nor pilates would be terrible in this regard - could provide some help by increasing
    the residual tension in those muscles and/or facilitating a change in posture.

    See my web site for how I work my abdominals, core muscles, and everything else with kettlebells.

    -S-
    --
    http://www.kbnj.com
     
  7. Andy Key

    Andy Key Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, ~ironman~ <[email protected]> writes
    >Can you further elaborate the pain? Where exactly is it?
    Lower back - er- how much more specific can I be? I'm not an anatomist. Just above my waist.

    >Does it radiate to your legs?

    Nope.

    >Is it aggrevated by any kind of movement?

    Yes - if I stop running it eases off.

    >When and how does the pain subside?

    After about 30 mins (as it said in my original post). How? It gradually gets less. By the time I've
    finished (45-50 mins of running for a 10K run stage) it's still present but not slowing me down.

    >Any signs of inflammation afterward you find?

    No.
    --
     
  8. Nickles

    Nickles Guest

    Hi, I HAD EXACTLY the same type of problem you describe with excruciating back pain during the bike
    to run with all of the symptoms you describe. I raced for 2 years thinking that it was normal to
    "hurt" off the bike and I should just suck it up. When I bought a newer bike with different geometry
    and with a longer top tube/stem combo and got fitted correctly by a bike specialist- all the bike to
    run pain was gone. I was probably very lucky that I didn't do any serious permanent damage to my
    back during those early races. It is most likely your bike fit, either too stretched out or jammed
    over the handlebars putting your back in an unusual stress positon. My thought is that my muscles
    were trying to compensate and were totally fatigued by the time the run started after a hard bike
    effort! It is amazing what a cm or two difference will make to your bike fit- believe me I KNOW!!!!
    I remember trying several different saddle/stem positions but there was something about the geometry
    of that Miele bike that my back just didn't like. Seriously think about buying a new bike and
    getting properly fitted or if cash is a problem try a bike fit specialist and go for a new
    stem/saddle height/positioning to see if that helps. mikey :)

    ps. lower back strengthening exercises and abdomenal strengthening wouldn't hurt either.

    =========
    Andy Key <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Every time I go from the bike ride to the run stage in a tri, after about 5 minutes I get
    > excruciating lower back pain. This normally lasts for the next half hour. I'm talking short
    > distance up to Olympic length events, so 30-40K cycle then 8-10K run. I don't get back pain any
    > other time - not while cycling, and not during a "normal" run (i.e. a run where I haven't been
    > cycling first). I've never seen anyone else mention this problem in magazines or this newsgroup,
    > so maybe it's just me! Any ideas on how to help this? Specific strengthening exercises? Changing
    > my bike setup?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Andy
     
  9. ~Ironman~

    ~Ironman~ Guest

    My friend got similar pain before, and we could see how the improvement in his posture helps. Try
    stretching more. Do some exercise to strenthen the muscles around the trunk, including back
    extension. Note your posture all the time, including off-training hours. Get a friend to watch you
    during training, and better off all the time, and see if there's any room for improvement in your
    posture. At least once I'd advice a visit to the physician or chiropractor and see if they can offer
    you anything. My friend said that massage helps as well.

    Good luck.

    "Andy Key" <[email protected]> ¦b¶l¥ó news:[email protected] ¤¤¼¶¼g...
    > In message <[email protected]>, ~ironman~ <[email protected]> writes
    > >Can you further elaborate the pain? Where exactly is it?
    > Lower back - er- how much more specific can I be? I'm not an anatomist. Just above my waist.
    >
    > >Does it radiate to your legs?
    >
    > Nope.
    >
    > >Is it aggrevated by any kind of movement?
    >
    > Yes - if I stop running it eases off.
    >
    > >When and how does the pain subside?
    >
    > After about 30 mins (as it said in my original post). How? It gradually gets less. By the time
    > I've finished (45-50 mins of running for a 10K run stage) it's still present but not slowing
    > me down.
    >
    > >Any signs of inflammation afterward you find?
    >
    > No.
    > --
     
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