Help me identify this Peugeot!

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by velo-france, Nov 4, 2009.

  1. velo-france

    velo-france New Member

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    Hi, as the title suggest, I'm trying to work out when and what model my Puegeot bike is. I was given it by a colleague. It says 'Made in France' and has the following serial number Y707 07652. The saddle needs a new cover and the wheels need pumping up (if anyone know the attachment for pumps, that's an added bonus).

    If this also helps, the bike has Simplex gears, Atax handlebars, and Lyotard pedals. I've attached a few pictures. Any help is appreciated as I want to bring this back to its former glory!

    If the pictures aren't clear, let me know.
     
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  2. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    The rear dropouts would offer a good clue. Please show a picture of those. Also, are there any stickers showing what the frame is made of, like "carbolite 103"? Also, what are the rims made of?

    Based on the cottered crank, I would say it was a UO-8. It was the basic model. It does not have high collector value but many people still seem to appreciate the way they ride and handle a lot.

    If you are thinking of keeping and using it, I would do an online fit calculator to see if it is a good fit for you.

    As for the valves, they are either presta or schraeder. Any bike shop will sell you a cheap little adapter which will let you pump up a presta with a pump designed for schraeder valves (the automotive style valve).

    It is possible the grease may have separated inside the hubs if the machine was not used regularly. If there are dusty, oily stains around the hubs, then that is probabaly the case. If so, either repack the hubs, pedal, and steering bearings, or at least try to drip some oil in there.
     
  3. velo-france

    velo-france New Member

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    Thanks for the advice, that's a lot to get me started. Here's a picture of the rear dropouts, I wonder if that will help you identify it.
    I have looked for stickers but it doesn’t say Carbolite anywhere – I mean it could be, but I’m not sure. I’ve included pictures of the rims too – there’s an interesting pattern which may help to identify it. I think the rims are made of aluminium though.
     
  4. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    If there is a pattern embossed onto the braking surface of the rims, then they are undoubtedly steel. Chrome steel does not stop as well in the rain as aluminum so some makers put a pattern onto the rim.

    I believe what you have is an early 1980s UO-8, which someone loved a great deal and outfitted with special wing nuts and leather saddle. I say it is 80's because of the slanted cage on the rear derailleur. It was Peugeot's entry level machine, which someone dressed up with a few accessories.
     
  5. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    That's actually a pretty nice bike ...

    While garage sale GT is correct in identifying the bike as one of the lower end Peugeots, I cannot suggest a model, but I can tell you that its vintage is closer to 1970 ... probably not earlier than 1965 & certainly not later than 1975 ... I believe the particular Simplex rear derailleur (your pics are woefully sub-standard) appears to predate a version which was partially made with Delrin (the CF of its day) which was introduced around 1968-or-1969.

    There are no decals identifying the tubing because it was made with what some people refer to as "gas pipe" -- i.e., seamed tubing.

    The original cost, sans fenders & rack, would probably have been between $100-and-$110 (that would be probably be equivalent to spending about $700 bike, now ... not the least expensive ... pretty far from the top-of-the-line). I think you can compare it to a Raleigh Grand Prix from the same era.

    The bike has the most value to someone like myself who is amongst those who appreciate the ride of a vintage French bike.

    The tire's tubes have PRESTA valves ...

    BTW. If you are planning to ride the bike then you need to install some 'real' brake levers. I can't tell what the original owner did with regard to the levers, but it's probably not particularly safe.
     
  6. garage sale GT

    garage sale GT New Member

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    I misinterpreted what I saw. The forward tilt of the derailleur caused it to appear like a slant parallelogram model which suntour held a patent on until the 1980s(?). It is clear now that I was wrong. I also retract what I said about the seat and wing nuts being add-ons since I am unfamiliar with earlier Peugeots, and all sorts of bikes came with leather seats in the sixties and early seventies.
     
  7. velo-france

    velo-france New Member

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    So if it is from the 1965-’75, what model do you think it is?
    Yes, I‘ve fallen in love with the thing. Interesting to hear the contrasting opinions. Here’s a couple more pics of the derailleur. Please tell me if these are good enough! From my own (albeit completely novice) research, I thought it could have been from 1977 - 1978. On a count of the downtube decals matching those of the ‘77/’78 era.
    Peugeot Model Identification
     
  8. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    Well, if you are correct about the year, then the bike is even lower in the scale of models & more akin to the Raleigh RECORD (somewhere between 10%-to-20% less in cost than the Raleigh GRAND PRIX) because by 1977, a cottered crank would probably only be found on the least expensive bikes ...

    But, it's still a nice enough frame which you will enjoy riding after you put some real hand brake levers on AND/OR update it with contemporary components if you are so inclined.
     
  9. pat5319

    pat5319 New Member

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    It's a U08 from the 70's, general purpose/entry level



     
  10. jellymuscles

    jellymuscles New Member

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    My wife has a Peugeot that looks exactly like this one--all the markings. It is, indeed, an OU8. She bought it in Washington DC in 1976. These bikes have a good feel. They are not made of gas pipe, they are made of high quality carbon steel. Not really too heavy either. The tubing must be pretty thin. It had not been riden for 20 years, I pumped up the tires the other day and tried it. If you want a picture, let me know.
    Jellymuscles
     
  11. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Actually, an AE-8 (see link: Google Image Result for http://cyclespeugeot.com/images/1974_Peugeot_AO8.jpg)

    That's one model down from the UO-8, but in full touring regalia. The frame build is probably equivalent to the UO-8 without chrome plated fork tips. Equipment differences are steel solid-axle hubs instead of quick-release. The brake levers and saddle are not stock. Note the tape gap where the original Mafac levers were attached. The tape is most likely original.

    The rear Simplex derailleur is not a slant parallelogram design, but because it's sprung at the hanger and at the pulley arm, it does follow the the contour of the freewheel a little better than its peers.

    The presence of downtube shifters says it's older than 1975, and the bashguard on the crank says it's newer than 1971.
     
  12. stevegreer

    stevegreer Member

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    Beautiful bike my man! I am a big fan of the vintage '70s and '80s bikes.
     
  13. pat5319

    pat5319 New Member

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    Remember not all U08's had chrome tips and Suntour had a patunet on slant p-grams at that time so everyone else used std until Shimano came ot with the "Crane" adn the derailleur may not be stock

     
  14. ntwbill

    ntwbill New Member

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    Actually it looks like an AE8 with a headlight, or front fender (SS Mudguard) from an UE18. An OU8 had the chrome front fork tips. Also a chainwheel guard was added. I just found my brouchure in the family garage. I paid $159.00 in 1974. It was geared just right for me. The only things I did to it was switch to aluminum rims and Michelin High Speed tires. The one I have now also has a gel seat. It's hell getting old.
     
  15. ntwbill

    ntwbill New Member

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    You are right. I missed your post otherwise I could have saved some keystrokes
     
  16. ax25nut

    ax25nut Member

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    Now that everyone has weighed in on WHAT your bike is or isn't, I confess I haven't a clue. Just wanted to say I love these vintage bikes and yours is a really well-preserved example of a nice frame with what appears to be entry-level components, I'd say on par with my old Concord I had late 70's-early 80's or so. While it may not be the same vintage, it certainly has the look and, I suspect, also the feel of that same bike, or my Ross Gran Tour ('84). I absolutely love the butterfly wingnuts on the axles, as well as the brake levers, despite what anyone else may have to say about them.It is important to realise that these brake levers are used when relaxed conditions permit it, not when you need immediate access to stopping power. Also, I'd only lube this bike and swap for new brake pads (avoid dry rot), and perhaps new tires/tubes, but only if the old ones (after inflating properly) appear to suffer from cracking along the sidewalls. Then I'd get on it and ride! The only thing wrong with this bike is that trashy (imho) light and the fact that it's too small for me! I'd keep the light and racks too, since they're obviously not hurting anything. Did I mention you should ride this thing?!

    By the way....I saw three similar vintage bikes in a Columbus, OH bike shop yesterday and all were over $200. The guy didn't even clean them, let alone update them. They were Montobecane, Raleigh, and Fuji, and they were all original, as near as I could tell, and of the same caliber as your bike.

    So why aren't you out on this thing?
     
  17. doingyourmom101

    doingyourmom101 New Member

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    /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif this is a peugeot u08 i would have to say it is a uo8 from before 75 because from 75 on to 1980 they used a head badge instead of a sticker, great bike none the less. but is definetly a u08 frame, it can't be a pa 10 or px10 because of the tubing. The PA10 (which is basically a u08 but a newer lighter model) and PX10 used the same basic geometry The PA10 used the standard Peugeot, hi-tensile steel tubing while the PX10 used top grade Reynolds 531 butted tubing. The PX10 will have chrome rear stays, while a PA10 will not. if you want me to go further in depth just reply or message me
     
  18. danfoz

    danfoz Well-Known Member

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    THE definitive Peugeot catalogue:

    http://www.peugeotshow.com/

    I hope OP found his answer already this thread is 3 years old. Edit: he did and I just read the rest, good show.
     
  19. dhk2

    dhk2 Active Member

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    Yeah, this paint scheme must have been very popular then. I had the mixte version of this bike, identical paint and decals. It was cool because it used twin downtubes, one on each side of the chainstay, which when straight back to the dropouts. I finally sold it a couple of years ago, along with a companion Jeunet from of about the same age, 1975, to guys in the bike club looking for vintage bikes for their wives to try out. Don't know the model numbers, but it was the basic bike. When you say "not really too heavy either", suppose that's a relative term. The tubing wasn't thin-walled or butted, certainly nothing like the 531 tubeset on my Raleigh GS of the same vintage.
     
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