Help me with my anerobic threshold

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Realdean, Feb 9, 2003.

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  1. Realdean

    Realdean Guest

    I'm new to cycling and need an opinion on how I determined my anerobic threshold. I'm 45 years old
    and weigh 170lbs. I have a resting heart rate of 41 upon rising. After standing my HR jumps to 62.
    During the day my HR ranges between 68 and 82 BPM working as a pharmacist. Using a Cycle-ops Fluid
    Trainer I warmed up for 5 minutes at a cadance of 90. At 5 minutes my heart rate was 112BPM
    cycling at
    13.2mph. Then at every other odd minute I increased my cycle speed keeping the same cadance of 90.
    The even minutes were used to recover, but the same 90 cadance was maintained. At the 17 minute
    interval my HR was 160bpm, cadance was 90 and my speed was 19.7mph. My HR hit a plateau over the
    next 6 minutes. At 23 minutes my HR was 162. My bicycle speed was 22.2MPH. At 25 minutes I began
    to deteriorate. I could not maintain a 90 cadance. My HR was 165 and my bicycle speed fell off
    dramatically. I ASSUME THAT I REACHED MY ANEROBIC THRESHOLD somewhere at the 24-25 minute mark.
    My perceived exersion was greater than 90%. I went no further. I have been training for only 3
    months. I use a HR monitor. I have NEVER seen a HR abouve 170BPM. Some cyclist that I train with
    say that I should be able to get my HR in the 180 to 210 range but it is my understanding that
    one's maxiumum heart rate is genetically marked. So my question is....based on the data I
    obtained, could it be that my max HR is about 170 and my redline zone begins about 162BPM at
    which time I hit me anerobic threshold. Thanks in advance for the
    feedback......................dean
     
    Tags:


  2. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (realdean) wrote:

    > I'm new to cycling and need an opinion on how I determined my anerobic threshold. I'm 45 years old
    > and weigh 170lbs. I have a resting heart rate of 41 upon rising. After standing my HR jumps to 62.
    > During the day my HR ranges between 68 and 82 BPM working as a pharmacist. Using a Cycle-ops Fluid
    > Trainer I warmed up for 5 minutes at a cadance of 90. At 5 minutes my heart rate was 112BPM
    > cycling at
    > 13.2mph. Then at every other odd minute I increased my cycle speed keeping the same cadance of 90.
    > The even minutes were used to recover, but the same 90 cadance was maintained. At the 17 minute
    > interval my HR was 160bpm, cadance was 90 and my speed was 19.7mph. My HR hit a plateau over
    > the next 6 minutes. At 23 minutes my HR was 162. My bicycle speed was 22.2MPH. At 25 minutes I
    > began to deteriorate. I could not maintain a 90 cadance. My HR was 165 and my bicycle speed
    > fell off dramatically. I ASSUME THAT I REACHED MY ANEROBIC THRESHOLD somewhere at the 24-25
    > minute mark. My perceived exersion was greater than 90%. I went no further. I have been
    > training for only 3 months. I use a HR monitor. I have NEVER seen a HR abouve 170BPM. Some
    > cyclist that I train with say that I should be able to get my HR in the 180 to 210 range but it
    > is my understanding that one's maxiumum heart rate is genetically marked. So my question
    > is....based on the data I obtained, could it be that my max HR is about 170 and my redline zone
    > begins about 162BPM at which time I hit me anerobic threshold. Thanks in advance for the
    > feedback......................dean

    Hey dean,

    Enjoy this time of your riding "career" when you are learning every day and getting better no matter
    how you train! Really, I recall with fondness when I first got serious.

    OK, at 45 do not expect to EVER see 180-210. The people who told you that you should be able to get
    it that high are not your doctor, do not have a physiological background, etc.

    I'm 32, and my max is 182. I see it maybe a few times per summer. I cannot possibly get it that high
    unless it is really hot and I'm dehydrated, or I'm competing.

    As for your anaerobic threshold, there are various ways to determine
    it. The most accurate way is to find a person in your area who is known as being a good coach, a
    scientific coach. Hire him to test you, by taking a pinprick of blood while riding. They can
    test the lactate in the blood and give you an exact number. The people I know who have done this
    (me included) have all come away with a lower AT than we thought. I can comfortable ride 2 beats
    below my AT forever. Once I cross it I start to get uncomfortable. Remember that you can ride
    over your AT for a while. Your AT is NOT where you want to die from that pain.

    How did you feel at 23 minutes/162? If you felt bad at 165, your AT I'll bet is around 159. I
    thought mine was 168-170. Testing revealed that my AT is 159.

    Finally, your AT number is relatively meaningless all by itself. Here is what is more important:
    1. How much power can you generate at your AT
    2. How efficient are you at your AT
    3. AT what percentage of your Max HR does your AT fall

    Don't concentrate on raising your AT. That will improve at glacial speeds, if ever. Just get
    more efficient and powerful at your AT so that when racing you won't need to hit your AT to stay
    with the pack.
     
  3. Frank Cooley

    Frank Cooley Guest

    uh well I'm 61 and I did 180 last year, so maybe your statement isn't quite accurate. Max HR varies
    a lot. Having said that I think I've seen the last of 180. I used to get there adozen times a year,
    but now only once or twice.

    To the poster. Don't take rest minutes during your test, just keep increasing you effort. When you
    "plateau" you are pretyy close to your max.

    Frank

    Frank "chiefhiawatha" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    > (realdean) wrote:
    >
    > > I'm new to cycling and need an opinion on how I determined my anerobic threshold. I'm 45 years
    > > old and weigh 170lbs. I have a resting heart rate of 41 upon rising. After standing my HR jumps
    > > to 62. During the day my HR ranges between 68 and 82 BPM working as a pharmacist. Using a
    > > Cycle-ops Fluid Trainer I warmed up for 5 minutes at a cadance of 90. At 5 minutes my heart rate
    > > was 112BPM cycling at
    > > 13.2mph. Then at every other odd minute I increased my cycle speed keeping the same cadance of
    > > 90. The even minutes were used to recover, but the same 90 cadance was maintained. At the 17
    > > minute interval my HR was 160bpm, cadance was 90 and my speed was 19.7mph. My HR hit a
    > > plateau over the next 6 minutes. At 23 minutes my HR was 162. My bicycle speed was 22.2MPH.
    > > At 25 minutes I began to deteriorate. I could not maintain a 90 cadance. My HR was 165 and my
    > > bicycle speed fell off dramatically. I ASSUME THAT I REACHED MY ANEROBIC THRESHOLD somewhere
    > > at the 24-25 minute mark. My perceived exersion was greater than 90%. I went no further. I
    > > have been training for only 3 months. I use a HR monitor. I have NEVER seen a HR abouve
    > > 170BPM. Some cyclist that I train with say that I should be able to get my HR in the 180 to
    > > 210 range but it is my understanding that one's maxiumum heart rate is genetically marked. So
    > > my question is....based on the data I obtained, could it be that my max HR is about 170 and
    > > my redline zone begins about 162BPM at which time I hit me anerobic threshold. Thanks in
    > > advance for the feedback......................dean
    >
    > Hey dean,
    >
    > Enjoy this time of your riding "career" when you are learning every day and getting better no
    > matter how you train! Really, I recall with fondness when I first got serious.
    >
    > OK, at 45 do not expect to EVER see 180-210. The people who told you that you should be able to
    > get it that high are not your doctor, do not have a physiological background, etc.
    >
    > I'm 32, and my max is 182. I see it maybe a few times per summer. I cannot possibly get it that
    > high unless it is really hot and I'm dehydrated, or I'm competing.
    >
    > As for your anaerobic threshold, there are various ways to determine
    > it. The most accurate way is to find a person in your area who is known as being a good coach, a
    > scientific coach. Hire him to test you, by taking a pinprick of blood while riding. They can
    > test the lactate in the blood and give you an exact number. The people I know who have done
    > this (me included) have all come away with a lower AT than we thought. I can comfortable ride
    > 2 beats below my AT forever. Once I cross it I start to get uncomfortable. Remember that you
    > can ride over your AT for a while. Your AT is NOT where you want to die from that pain.
    >
    > How did you feel at 23 minutes/162? If you felt bad at 165, your AT I'll bet is around 159. I
    > thought mine was 168-170. Testing revealed that my AT is 159.
    >
    > Finally, your AT number is relatively meaningless all by itself. Here is what is more important:
    > 1. How much power can you generate at your AT
    > 2. How efficient are you at your AT
    > 3. AT what percentage of your Max HR does your AT fall
    >
    > Don't concentrate on raising your AT. That will improve at glacial speeds, if ever. Just get more
    > efficient and powerful at your AT so that when racing you won't need to hit your AT to stay with
    > the pack.
     
  4. I agree with Frank. When I determined my max HR I warmed up for about 5 minutes. Then I started at
    16 mph, every two minutes I increased my speed by two mph. without a recovery period. When I could
    no logner continue my HR was 190. I'm 50 years old.

    "Frank Cooley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > uh well I'm 61 and I did 180 last year, so maybe your statement isn't
    quite
    > accurate. Max HR varies a lot. Having said that I think I've seen the
    last
    > of 180. I used to get there adozen times a year, but now only once or twice.
    >
    > To the poster. Don't take rest minutes during your test, just keep increasing you effort. When you
    > "plateau" you are pretyy close to your
    max.
    >
    > Frank
    >
    >
    >
    > Frank "chiefhiawatha" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (realdean)
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > > I'm new to cycling and need an opinion on how I determined my anerobic threshold. I'm 45 years
    > > > old and weigh 170lbs. I have a resting heart rate of 41 upon rising. After standing my HR
    > > > jumps to 62. During the day my HR ranges between 68 and 82 BPM working as a pharmacist. Using
    > > > a Cycle-ops Fluid Trainer I warmed up for 5 minutes at a cadance of 90. At 5 minutes my heart
    > > > rate was 112BPM cycling at
    > > > 13.2mph. Then at every other odd minute I increased my cycle speed keeping the same cadance of
    > > > 90. The even minutes were used to recover, but the same 90 cadance was maintained. At the
    > > > 17 minute interval my HR was 160bpm, cadance was 90 and my speed was 19.7mph. My HR hit a
    > > > plateau over the next 6 minutes. At 23 minutes my HR was 162. My bicycle speed was 22.2MPH.
    > > > At 25 minutes I began to deteriorate. I could not maintain a 90 cadance. My HR was 165 and
    > > > my bicycle speed fell off dramatically. I ASSUME THAT I REACHED MY ANEROBIC THRESHOLD
    > > > somewhere at the 24-25 minute mark. My perceived exersion was greater than 90%. I went no
    > > > further. I have been training for only 3 months. I use a HR monitor. I have NEVER seen a HR
    > > > abouve 170BPM. Some cyclist that I train with say that I should be able to get my HR in the
    > > > 180 to 210 range but it is my understanding that one's maxiumum heart rate is genetically
    > > > marked. So my question is....based on the data I obtained, could it be that my max HR is
    > > > about 170 and my redline zone begins about 162BPM at which time I hit me anerobic
    > > > threshold. Thanks in advance for the feedback......................dean
    > >
    > > Hey dean,
    > >
    > > Enjoy this time of your riding "career" when you are learning every day and getting better no
    > > matter how you train! Really, I recall with fondness when I first got serious.
    > >
    > > OK, at 45 do not expect to EVER see 180-210. The people who told you that you should be able to
    > > get it that high are not your doctor, do not have a physiological background, etc.
    > >
    > > I'm 32, and my max is 182. I see it maybe a few times per summer. I cannot possibly get it that
    > > high unless it is really hot and I'm dehydrated, or I'm competing.
    > >
    > > As for your anaerobic threshold, there are various ways to determine
    > > it. The most accurate way is to find a person in your area who is known as being a good coach, a
    > > scientific coach. Hire him to test you, by taking a pinprick of blood while riding. They can
    > > test the lactate in the blood and give you an exact number. The people I know who have done
    > > this (me included) have all come away with a lower AT than we thought. I can comfortable
    > > ride 2 beats below my AT forever. Once I cross it I start to get uncomfortable. Remember
    > > that you can ride over your AT for a while. Your AT is NOT where you want to die from that
    > > pain.
    > >
    > > How did you feel at 23 minutes/162? If you felt bad at 165, your AT I'll bet is around 159. I
    > > thought mine was 168-170. Testing revealed that my AT is 159.
    > >
    > > Finally, your AT number is relatively meaningless all by itself. Here is what is more important:
    > > 1. How much power can you generate at your AT
    > > 2. How efficient are you at your AT
    > > 3. AT what percentage of your Max HR does your AT fall
    > >
    > > Don't concentrate on raising your AT. That will improve at glacial speeds, if ever. Just get
    > > more efficient and powerful at your AT so that when racing you won't need to hit your AT to stay
    > > with the pack.
     
  5. Warren

    Warren Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, chiefhiawatha
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    > (realdean) wrote:
    >
    > > I'm new to cycling and need an opinion on how I determined my anerobic threshold. I'm 45 years
    > > old and weigh 170lbs. I have a resting heart rate of 41 upon rising. After standing my HR jumps
    > > to 62. During the day my HR ranges between 68 and 82 BPM working as a pharmacist. Using a
    > > Cycle-ops Fluid Trainer I warmed up for 5 minutes at a cadance of 90. At 5 minutes my heart rate
    > > was 112BPM cycling at
    > > 13.2mph. Then at every other odd minute I increased my cycle speed keeping the same cadance of
    > > 90. The even minutes were used to recover, but the same 90 cadance was maintained. At the 17
    > > minute interval my HR was 160bpm, cadance was 90 and my speed was 19.7mph. My HR hit a
    > > plateau over the next 6 minutes. At 23 minutes my HR was 162. My bicycle speed was 22.2MPH.
    > > At 25 minutes I began to deteriorate. I could not maintain a 90 cadance. My HR was 165 and my
    > > bicycle speed fell off dramatically. I ASSUME THAT I REACHED MY ANEROBIC THRESHOLD somewhere
    > > at the 24-25 minute mark. My perceived exersion was greater than 90%. I went no further. I
    > > have been training for only 3 months. I use a HR monitor. I have NEVER seen a HR abouve
    > > 170BPM. Some cyclist that I train with say that I should be able to get my HR in the 180 to
    > > 210 range but it is my understanding that one's maxiumum heart rate is genetically marked. So
    > > my question is....based on the data I obtained, could it be that my max HR is about 170 and
    > > my redline zone begins about 162BPM at which time I hit me anerobic threshold. Thanks in
    > > advance for the feedback......................dean
    >
    > Hey dean,
    >
    > Enjoy this time of your riding "career" when you are learning every day and getting better no
    > matter how you train! Really, I recall with fondness when I first got serious.
    >
    > OK, at 45 do not expect to EVER see 180-210. The people who told you that you should be able to
    > get it that high are not your doctor, do not have a physiological background, etc.

    Max hr varies for each person. Mine is 197-198. In today's race it was 180-187 continuously for 20+
    minutes. I'm 44 in April.

    -WG
     
  6. Jtn

    Jtn Guest

  7. Steve

    Steve Guest

    Everyone is different. I have a buddy who is 53 and his max (at least a couple years ago) was 209..

    On 2/10/03 8:45 AM, in article [email protected], "JTN"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "warren" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:090220031528360029%[email protected]...
    >> In article <[email protected]>, chiefhiawatha
    >> <[email protected]> wrote: Max hr varies for each person. Mine is 197-198. In today's race
    >> it was 180-187 continuously for 20+ minutes. I'm 44 in April.
    >>
    >> -WG
    >
    > you stud.... if mine sees 188 i see the "other side"
     
  8. David

    David Guest

    At 457 may max heart rate was 191 so can see these levels after all it is only genetics that
    dertermine the max heart rate. I have also know others that went that heart. Right now at 52 my max
    is 189-190. "chiefhiawatha" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    > (realdean) wrote:
    >
    > Hey dean,
    >
    > Enjoy this time of your riding "career" when you are learning every day and getting better no
    > matter how you train! Really, I recall with fondness when I first got serious.
    >
    > OK, at 45 do not expect to EVER see 180-210. The people who told you that you should be able to
    > get it that high are not your doctor, do not have a physiological background, etc.
    >
    > I'm 32, and my max is 182. I see it maybe a few times per summer. I cannot possibly get it that
    > high unless it is really hot and I'm dehydrated, or I'm competing.
    >
    > As for your anaerobic threshold, there are various ways to determine
    > it. The most accurate way is to find a person in your area who is known as being a good coach, a
    > scientific coach. Hire him to test you, by taking a pinprick of blood while riding. They can
    > test the lactate in the blood and give you an exact number. The people I know who have done
    > this (me included) have all come away with a lower AT than we thought. I can comfortable ride
    > 2 beats below my AT forever. Once I cross it I start to get uncomfortable. Remember that you
    > can ride over your AT for a while. Your AT is NOT where you want to die from that pain.
    >
    > How did you feel at 23 minutes/162? If you felt bad at 165, your AT I'll bet is around 159. I
    > thought mine was 168-170. Testing revealed that my AT is 159.
    >
    > Finally, your AT number is relatively meaningless all by itself. Here is what is more important:
    > 1. How much power can you generate at your AT
    > 2. How efficient are you at your AT
    > 3. AT what percentage of your Max HR does your AT fall
    >
    > Don't concentrate on raising your AT. That will improve at glacial speeds, if ever. Just get more
    > efficient and powerful at your AT so that when racing you won't need to hit your AT to stay with
    > the pack.
     
  9. And we have a terrific rider in our club. He's around 40 and his maxHR is
    160.

    --
    Replace the dots to reply

    Perre

    "steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BA6D1BFB.269F6%[email protected]...
    > Everyone is different. I have a buddy who is 53 and his max (at least a couple years ago) was
    161..
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > On 2/10/03 8:45 AM, in article [email protected], "JTN"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > "warren" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:090220031528360029%[email protected]...
    > >> In article <[email protected]>, chiefhiawatha
    > >> <[email protected]> wrote: Max hr varies for each person. Mine is 197-198. In today's
    > >> race it was 180-187 continuously for 20+ minutes. I'm 44 in April.
    > >>
    > >> -WG
    > >
    > > you stud.... if mine sees 188 i see the "other side"
    > >
     
  10. Warren

    Warren Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, David <[email protected]> wrote:

    > At 457 may max heart rate was 191 so can see these levels after all it is only genetics that
    > dertermine the max heart rate. I have also know others that went that heart. Right now at 52 my
    > max is 189-190.

    Slight correction/addition. HR drops off about 1-2 bpm per year as we age but people who continue to
    train tend to see a smaller drop in MHR per year. MHR really isn't an indicator of ability anyway...

    -WG
     
  11. Dwall

    Dwall Guest

    At 45 my max hr is 193 and I can ride all day at 180! So I'm the freak you sound like the normal as
    normal is defined! Just ride and use the numbers you have details are better spent on race tactic
    and HAVING FUN! At our age the best we can do is have fun and give to the sport.....winning is
    relative..... being able to ride/race is the winning! The podium stands are just passing sparks not
    the real win! Have fun and treat everone fair that is the REAL WIN!
     
  12. Warren

    Warren Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, dwall <[email protected]> wrote:

    > At 45 my max hr is 193 and I can ride all day at 180! So I'm the freak you sound like the normal
    > as normal is defined!

    I don't think you're a freak. You're a liar. Lance would be quite happy if he could ride all day at
    93% of MHR. You should race him sometime.

    -WG
     
  13. warren wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, dwall <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>At 45 my max hr is 193 and I can ride all day at 180! So I'm the freak you sound like the normal
    >>as normal is defined!
    >
    >
    > I don't think you're a freak. You're a liar. Lance would be quite happy if he could ride all day
    > at 93% of MHR. You should race him sometime.

    According to data published by Chris Carmichael, Lance has the following:

    MHR = 201 LT = 178bpm Average HR in TT 188-192

    So in a TT, Lance would ride at 93% of MHR. He could probably ride "all day" at LT or slightly
    below, which is 88% of MHR.

    An LT of 93% MHR on the bike would be, um, exceptional. STF

    >
    > -WG
     
  14. Kyle Legate

    Kyle Legate Guest

    On Tue, 11 Feb 2003, warren wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, dwall <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > At 45 my max hr is 193 and I can ride all day at 180! So I'm the freak you sound like the normal
    > > as normal is defined!
    >
    > I don't think you're a freak. You're a liar. Lance would be quite happy if he could ride all day
    > at 93% of MHR. You should race him sometime.
    >
    A few years ago I estimated my max HR at 209 and was regularly averaging around 185 for races of
    around 2 hours. My HR has always run hot, and riding at 88% of my MHR was not a problem for me, but
    there is just something missing between Lance and I.

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected] Kyle Legate [email protected]

    Tower of Tongues:Thursday PM:10:30-11:30 EDT:http://cfmu.mcmaster.ca moon
    musick:ritual:IDM:experimental(electronica):minimalism:glitch
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...
     
  15. Warren

    Warren Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Kyle Legate
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Tue, 11 Feb 2003, warren wrote:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>, dwall <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > At 45 my max hr is 193 and I can ride all day at 180! So I'm the freak you sound like the
    > > > normal as normal is defined!
    > >
    > > I don't think you're a freak. You're a liar. Lance would be quite happy if he could ride all day
    > > at 93% of MHR. You should race him sometime.
    > >
    > A few years ago I estimated my max HR at 209 and was regularly averaging around 185 for races of
    > around 2 hours. My HR has always run hot, and riding at 88% of my MHR was not a problem for me,
    > but there is just something missing between Lance and I.

    Just a little something? Gotta be the shoes.

    When I was younger I could ride at higher % of MHR but the guy who claimed to "ride all day" at 93%
    of MHR was not young, and even if he was he's still a liar or else we'd all know his name by now.

    -WG
     
  16. There is a guy in my skating club who can comfortably stay at a very high heart rate for a long
    time. This guy can stay above 90% of his max heart rate for our entire one hour skate practice no
    problem. The strange thing is that for the same pace I average about 65% of my maximum heart rate.
    My friend might have a high lactic threashold or anerobic threashold but that is the the entire
    story because often when we are just skating around slow he is at 80% while I am at 60%.

    We often joke about his "gift". For me the funny thing is that at 90% max heart rate my speach is
    slured and I can hardly talk this guy can still hold a lucid conversation at 90%. The human body is
    a strange thing there are always a few freaks out there who don't seem to follow the same rules.

    For me it takes a world of pain to see 90% on my heart rate monitor while my friend can get to 90%
    with almost no effort.

    ...Mark

    "warren" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:110220031529554552%[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, Kyle Legate
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > On Tue, 11 Feb 2003, warren wrote:
    > >
    > > > In article <[email protected]>, dwall <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > At 45 my max hr is 193 and I can ride all day at 180! So I'm the
    freak you
    > > > > sound like the normal as normal is defined!
    > > >
    > > > I don't think you're a freak. You're a liar. Lance would be quite
    happy
    > > > if he could ride all day at 93% of MHR. You should race him sometime.
    > > >
    > > A few years ago I estimated my max HR at 209 and was regularly averaging around 185 for races of
    > > around 2 hours. My HR has always run hot, and riding at 88% of my MHR was not a problem for me,
    > > but there is just something missing between Lance and I.
    >
    > Just a little something? Gotta be the shoes.
    >
    > When I was younger I could ride at higher % of MHR but the guy who claimed to "ride all day"
    > at 93% of MHR was not young, and even if he was he's still a liar or else we'd all know his
    > name by now.
    >
    > -WG
     
  17. Warren

    Warren Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Mark Farnsworth
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > There is a guy in my skating club who can comfortably stay at a very high heart rate for a long
    > time. This guy can stay above 90% of his max heart rate for our entire one hour skate practice no
    > problem. The strange thing is that for the same pace I average about 65% of my maximum heart rate.
    > My friend might have a high lactic threashold or anerobic threashold but that is the the entire
    > story because often when we are just skating around slow he is at 80% while I am at 60%.
    >
    > We often joke about his "gift". For me the funny thing is that at 90% max heart rate my speach
    > is slured and I can hardly talk this guy can still hold a lucid conversation at 90%. The human
    > body is a strange thing there are always a few freaks out there who don't seem to follow the
    > same rules.
    >
    > For me it takes a world of pain to see 90% on my heart rate monitor while my friend can get to 90%
    > with almost no effort.

    Assuming you mean ice skating, what is his HR at the end of a 1000m race? End of a 10,000m race?

    -WG
     
  18. Actually we are both inline speed skaters.

    At the end of an event such as a 1000 meters most people get very close to their max heart rate.
    Because of the extra resistance 700 meters on inlines is about the same as 1K on ice.

    My friend Garth has a max within a few beats of mine. I am 189 and I think he is 191 we both max out
    at the same heart rate but at any given heart rate his power output is much lower then mine. Part of
    this is his form since skating is very technique oriented.

    The key point is that he and I have very simular max heart rates but have very different anerobic
    thresholds and our experiance skating at a high percentage pace is much different. I find that above
    90% my ability to speak or even think is severly compromized. My friend can skate at 90% heart rate
    and chat with me about the weather or the news of the day. For me 90% feels very hard for him 90%
    feels "normal". When I skate easy my heart rate is around 50% for my friend, it is almost impossible
    for him to skate at a 50% pace because even a light effort has his heart rate at 70%.

    Basically it seems that there are some people who have very unique heart rate curves. My friend is
    an example. He really does not feel like he is going all that hard until he is above 95% but once he
    enters his "hard" zone it does not take long before he is maxed out. I am trying not to exagerate
    this second hand data. I believe that there a few people like dwall who are able to go "all day" at
    93% they are not all "liars".

    It also seams that having a high max heart rate or even a high anerobic threashold is not the only
    factor in cycling success. It helps to have a good heart but you really need the whole package and a
    special power curve. The key to success seems to be a good power curve with respect to one's heart
    rate. It does not help if you have a high heart rate threashold unless you can send good power to
    the pedels at that heart rate.

    ...Mark

    "warren" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:110220031858376989%[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, Mark Farnsworth
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > There is a guy in my skating club who can comfortably stay at a very
    high
    > > heart rate for a long time. This guy can stay above 90% of his max
    heart
    > > rate for our entire one hour skate practice no problem. The strange
    thing
    > > is that for the same pace I average about 65% of my maximum heart rate.
    My
    > > friend might have a high lactic threashold or anerobic threashold but
    that
    > > is the the entire story because often when we are just skating around
    slow
    > > he is at 80% while I am at 60%.
    > >
    > > We often joke about his "gift". For me the funny thing is that at 90%
    max
    > > heart rate my speach is slured and I can hardly talk this guy can still
    hold
    > > a lucid conversation at 90%. The human body is a strange thing there
    are
    > > always a few freaks out there who don't seem to follow the same rules.
    > >
    > > For me it takes a world of pain to see 90% on my heart rate monitor
    while my
    > > friend can get to 90% with almost no effort.
    >
    > Assuming you mean ice skating, what is his HR at the end of a 1000m race? End of a 10,000m race?
    >
    > -WG
     
  19. "Mark Farnsworth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Actually we are both inline speed skaters.
    >
    > At the end of an event such as a 1000 meters most people get very close to their max heart rate.
    > Because of the extra resistance 700 meters on
    inlines
    > is about the same as 1K on ice.
    >
    > My friend Garth has a max within a few beats of mine. I am 189 and I
    think
    > he is 191 we both max out at the same heart rate but at any given heart
    rate
    > his power output is much lower then mine. Part of this is his form since skating is very technique
    > oriented.
    >
    > The key point is that he and I have very simular max heart rates but have very different
    > anerobic thresholds and our experiance skating at a high percentage pace is much different. I
    > find that above 90% my ability to speak or even think is severly compromized. My friend can
    > skate at 90% heart rate and chat with me about the weather or the news of the day. For me 90%
    > feels very hard for him 90% feels "normal". When I skate easy my heart rate is around 50% for my
    > friend, it is almost impossible for him to skate at a 50% pace because even a light effort has
    > his heart rate at 70%.
    >
    > Basically it seems that there are some people who have very unique heart rate curves. My friend is
    > an example. He really does not feel like he is going all that hard until he is above 95% but once
    > he enters his "hard"
    zone
    > it does not take long before he is maxed out. I am trying not to
    exagerate
    > this second hand data. I believe that there a few people like dwall who
    are
    > able to go "all day" at 93% they are not all "liars".
    >
    > It also seams that having a high max heart rate or even a high anerobic threashold is not the only
    > factor in cycling success. It helps to have a good heart but you really need the whole package and
    > a special power
    curve.
    > The key to success seems to be a good power curve with respect to one's heart rate. It does not
    > help if you have a high heart rate threashold unless you can send good power to the pedels at that
    > heart rate.
    >
    > ...Mark
    >

    You probably have a point there. I see similarities between me and a cycling buddy. During a climb
    we both have similar heartrates and after the climb he drops down to mabe 110. I have 120 as soon as
    I get on the bike and 135 as soon as I start pedaling. I'll have maybe 160-165 on the flats and
    170-180 on the hills. My max is 187. So when I'm cruising along at 165 feeling groovy he's cruising
    along at maybe 120-130. I am a beginner compared to him and my aerobic fitness is not up to par yet,
    so I'm not sure how this will change in a year or two. But certainly the difference is a lot bigger
    than only aerobic fitness would suggest.
    --
    Replace the dots to reply

    Perre
     
  20. Dan

    Dan Guest

    warren <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<110220031529554552%[email protected]>...

    > and even if he was he's still a liar or else we'd all know his name by now.
    >
    > -WG

    No, because riding at a high %MHR for hours on end doesn't make you fast.
     
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