Help removing 1988 Croce D'Aune crank



A

A Muzi

Guest
-reverse crank puller-
Qui si parla Campagnolo wrote:
> I donno-Only one other shop, maybe 2 here in the republic would
> recognize these or the other 7mm self extractors of the era. Doubt
> anybody but us have the left hand crank puller tho.


We sell 'em , too!

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 
Q

Qui si parla Campagnolo

Guest
Tim McNamara wrote:
> "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> writes:
>
> > Tim McNamara wrote:
> >>
> >> It's too bad Campy went with 7 mm bolts, 8 mm are what all other
> >> self-extractors use and the stouter Allen wrench makes it easier to
> >> get the cranks tight enough. See the true story of my
> >> misadventures with these:

> >
> > Well, these were made in 1984 thru about 1990, 7-8 years before the
> > 8mm self extractors of shimano and octalink.

>
> Even a bit later than that. My ca 1996 Chorus gruppo had the 7 mm
> self-extractors, hence all the hijinks at Bub's Welding. 8 mm
> extractors were common by then.


Did some research and 1994, the old shape, was the last year for 7mm
self extractors. 1995, the 'Campagnolo' name and group went onto the
crank, the BB became 102mm and the 8mm bolts were common.
 
T

Tim McNamara

Guest
"Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> writes:

> Tim McNamara wrote:
>> "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> writes:
>>
>> > Tim McNamara wrote:
>> >>
>> >> It's too bad Campy went with 7 mm bolts, 8 mm are what all other
>> >> self-extractors use and the stouter Allen wrench makes it easier
>> >> to get the cranks tight enough. See the true story of my
>> >> misadventures with these:
>> >
>> > Well, these were made in 1984 thru about 1990, 7-8 years before
>> > the 8mm self extractors of shimano and octalink.

>>
>> Even a bit later than that. My ca 1996 Chorus gruppo had the 7 mm
>> self-extractors, hence all the hijinks at Bub's Welding. 8 mm
>> extractors were common by then.

>
> Did some research and 1994, the old shape, was the last year for 7mm
> self extractors. 1995, the 'Campagnolo' name and group went onto the
> crank, the BB became 102mm and the 8mm bolts were common.


Well, all I can tell ya is what fit into the Allen bolt... I bought
that gruppo brand spankin' new with the extractors already installed.
They was 7 mm and caused me quite a bit of grief.
 
Tim McNamara wrote:

> See the true story of my misadventures
> with these:
>
> http://www.sheldonbrown.com/mcnamara.html#bubs


Sooo... did the crank (arm) expire, or are you still using it?

I'm still using mine-- crank (arm) that loosened at least once, CRec.
Seems that if you're using hand tools at work, the allen key is fine.
Without constant exercise, what once was tight isn't tight enough any
more. And/or, wrench not long enough <g>.

The counter man at the local DIY car parts place told me "We don't
carry those" when I asked for a 3/8"drive x 7mm allen tool. Well, yes
they did, and on a special card rack of their very own <g>! ("Go look
for yourself") The plain allen wrench is available in hardware stores
for $.75 or so. The ratchet tool, $6-7, and well worth it IMHO.

Standing up in the peanut gallery dept: I've reduced a 1/2" ratchet
handle to 3/8", to use the longer handle, making it easier to start
bolts, and pull cranks. Carefully applied "extra" torque doesn't give
that allen head time to think about rounding out <g>... after a nice
drip of lube in the gap around the central, moving part of the
"self-extractor", and a little time to seep, of course.

The 3/8" drive x 7mm allen works great on a torque wrench when it's
time to put the crank (arm) back on-- the longer handle makes it a
bunch easier to apply enough pressure, and the measurement function
tells you when to quit. It's a surprising amount of force, per
manufacturer's recommendations. Craftsman (as noted here in the past)
sells a reasonable beam-style torque wrench, calibrated in inch-pounds
(or maybe even metric) pretty cheap-- $30- $40 for tools, including
"allen socket". Lots cheaper than that CRec crank (arm). Back on my
bleacher seat. --D-y
 
T

Tim McNamara

Guest
[email protected] writes:

> Tim McNamara wrote:
>
>> See the true story of my misadventures with these:
>>
>> http://www.sheldonbrown.com/mcnamara.html#bubs

>
> Sooo... did the crank (arm) expire, or are you still using it?


The taper survived intact and I rode it without any problems for
another couple of years before selling the bike. The subsequent owner
also rode it for a few years. I don't know where it is now- somewhere
on the West Coast I guess.
 
D

dustoyevsky

Guest
Tim McNamara wrote:
> [email protected] writes:
>
> > Tim McNamara wrote:
> >
> >> See the true story of my misadventures with these:
> >>
> >> http://www.sheldonbrown.com/mcnamara.html#bubs

> >
> > Sooo... did the crank (arm) expire, or are you still using it?

>
> The taper survived intact and I rode it without any problems for
> another couple of years before selling the bike. The subsequent owner
> also rode it for a few years. I don't know where it is now- somewhere
> on the West Coast I guess.


Thanks. Nope, not automatically ruined, even after several loosenings.
"Always worth a try", IMHO. Clean it well, grease it up, slam it on
with max. rec. torque, go ride up a few hills. If it works, it works.
--D-y
 
A

Alex Rodriguez

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] says...

>I can understand why Campagnolo would want to use a 7mm allen wrench
>for its cranks, but why left-handed?


Left handed so that the caps don't unscrew as you undo the bolts.

>Also, what's the deal with
>"self-extracting" and the pin spanner holes?


The holes are there in case you need to remove the self extracting caps.
---------------
Alex
 
J

john

Guest
Tim McNamara wrote:
> Tim Lines <[email protected]> writes:
>
> > I'd like some advise about how to remove a 1988 Croce D'Aune crank.
> >
> > The problem is that it's got lock bolts that take some kind of tiny
> > locking pin spanner that neither I nor my LBS has. My LBS says I
> > should use a really sharp and pointy pair of needle nose pliers. I
> > tried that for about 10 seconds before I stopped for fear of doing
> > damage. There's got to be a better way.

>
> There is, as has been pointed out. Stick a 7 mm allen wrench in there
> and unscrew the bolt out of the BB spindle. The cranks will be
> removed. It's as simple as can be, and if your bike shop did not know
> this, do not have anything further to do with them. they would have to
> be incompetent in the extreme to not know how to take these cranks
> off.
>
> If you want to remove the self-extractors for some reason, then you
> will need a pin spanner with pins of the appropriate size. IIRC the
> extractors are installed with left-hand threads to keep them from
> unscrewing while taking off the cranks. I believe that you can't use
> a standard crank puller with these cranks, but I've never tried. The
> self-extractors work very well, however.
>
> It's too bad Campy went with 7 mm bolts, 8 mm are what all other
> self-extractors use and the stouter Allen wrench makes it easier to
> get the cranks tight enough. See the true story of my misadventures
> with these:
>
> http://www.sheldonbrown.com/mcnamara.html#bubs


Tim
Great stories & writing.
John -I know good writing even if I can't do it. - Drew