Help removing cassette



S

Stephen

Guest
Hi,
trying to remove my MTB 7sp cassette with no luck :( - first time so I'm not
sure what I'm doing wrong

When I turn the lockring tool anti clockwise the whole axle just turns with
the actual cassette remaining stationary.

The cassette is shimano though don't know any other details. The tool I'm
trying to use is Cyclus Double Cassette Lockring tool
http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5300003496

Pictures of the cassette can be seen
http://uk.geocities.com/[email protected]/bike/

Any help / advice greatly appreciated



Cheers

Stephen
 
M

m-gineering

Guest
Stephen wrote:
>
> Hi,
> trying to remove my MTB 7sp cassette with no luck :( - first time so I'm not
> sure what I'm doing wrong
>
> When I turn the lockring tool anti clockwise the whole axle just turns with
> the actual cassette remaining stationary.
>
> The cassette is shimano though don't know any other details. The tool I'm
> trying to use is Cyclus Double Cassette Lockring tool
> http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5300003496
>
> Pictures of the cassette can be seen
> http://uk.geocities.com/[email protected]/bike/
>
> Any help / advice greatly appreciated
>
> Cheers
>
> Stephen


you need a chainwhip as well to atop the freewheel body rotating as in
www.m-gineering.nl/lockring2.jpg
--
---
Marten Gerritsen

INFOapestaartjeM-GINEERINGpuntNL
www.m-gineering.nl
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
Stephen wrote:
> Hi,
> trying to remove my MTB 7sp cassette with no luck :( - first time so
> I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong
>
> When I turn the lockring tool anti clockwise the whole axle just
> turns with the actual cassette remaining stationary.
>
> The cassette is shimano though don't know any other details. The tool
> I'm trying to use is Cyclus Double Cassette Lockring tool
> http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5300003496
>
> Pictures of the cassette can be seen
> http://uk.geocities.com/[email protected]/bike/


Isn't that a *freewheel*?

http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/FAQcogs.shtml

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/free-k7.html

~PB
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
m-gineering wrote:
>
>
> you need a chainwhip as well to atop the freewheel body rotating as in
> www.m-gineering.nl/lockring2.jpg


You can get away as a bodge with a workmate and an old chain. Trap the
chain end in the workmate, stand the wheel on the workmate next to the
chain and then wrap the chain round the cassette.

Tony
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
Stephen wrote:
> Hi,
> trying to remove my MTB 7sp cassette with no luck :( - first time so
> I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong
>
> When I turn the lockring tool anti clockwise the whole axle just
> turns with the actual cassette remaining stationary.
>
> The cassette is shimano though don't know any other details. The tool
> I'm trying to use is Cyclus Double Cassette Lockring tool
> http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5300003496
>
> Pictures of the cassette can be seen
> http://uk.geocities.com/[email protected]/bike/


Isn't that a *freewheel*?

www.sheldonbrown.com/free-k7.html

www.parktool.com/repair_help/FAQcogs.shtml

.....If so, you'll need a freewheel remover + long spanner/wrench or vice +
a huge amount of welly..... or a bike shop.

~PB
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
I wrote:

>> Pictures of the cassette can be seen
>> http://uk.geocities.com/[email protected]/bike/

>
> Isn't that a *freewheel*?
>
> www.sheldonbrown.com/free-k7.html
>
> www.parktool.com/repair_help/FAQcogs.shtml
>
> ....If so, you'll need a freewheel remover + long spanner/wrench or
> vice + a huge amount of welly..... or a bike shop.


Note. The above is only true if removing the whole freewheel, and I expect
replacing the whole lot will be cheaper/easier than doing individual
sprockets. It looks like you have a Hyperglide Freewheel -- sprockets of
which can be removed from the freewheel, cassette style. But you'll need
a different tool, I expect.

In any case, if removing sprockets from freewheel/freehub, sprockets need
to be held still with a chainwhip against the force of turning the
lockring. Sprockets then slide off after lockring is removed. Axle is
irrelevant.

~PB
 
M

MSeries

Guest
Pete Biggs wrote:
> Stephen wrote:
>
>>Hi,
>>trying to remove my MTB 7sp cassette with no luck :( - first time so
>>I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong
>>
>>When I turn the lockring tool anti clockwise the whole axle just
>>turns with the actual cassette remaining stationary.
>>
>>The cassette is shimano though don't know any other details. The tool
>>I'm trying to use is Cyclus Double Cassette Lockring tool
>>http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5300003496
>>
>>Pictures of the cassette can be seen
>>http://uk.geocities.com/[email protected]/bike/

>
>
> Isn't that a *freewheel*?
>
> www.sheldonbrown.com/free-k7.html
>
> www.parktool.com/repair_help/FAQcogs.shtml
>
> ....If so, you'll need a freewheel remover + long spanner/wrench or vice +
> a huge amount of welly..... or a bike shop.
>
> ~PB
>
>



My Shimano freewheel removal tool also works for removing Hyperglide
lockrings. Still need a vice and many wellies :)

Clamp your tool in a vice with its splines pointing up. Engage your
freewheel on the splines turn the wheel anti clickwise (? is the the
right direction ? Is been years since I did this). I have done it with a
spanner and my Dad to help. Dad suffered from ME for years and this 5
minute job wrecked him for the rest of the day :-(
 
S

Simon D

Guest
Pete's absolutely correct - you've got a screw-on freewheel rather than a
splined cassette system on which the freewheel mechanism is effectively part
of the hub. Replacing sprockets is very unlikely to be possible, because
spares are just not generally available and the freewheels are themselves
very cheap (£10-£17)

It's *just* possible that your cassette removal tool *might* still work,
because the splines are very similar, but it's certainly much safer to have
the right tool:

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/?ProductID=5300003496

If you do decide to try to use your existing tool, be aware that the force
required to remove a freewheel is, as Pete has stated, much greater than
that needed for a cassette. You might end up destroying your tool. (Ouch.)
You say that, at present, the axle rotates when you're trying to remove the
"cassette" (freewheel); this may indicate that the splines are not engaging
with the freewheel, and that the axle locknuts are restricting it. Removing
them may help, but will get you into hub adjustments you're not confident
with.

As I say, I'd go with Pete's advice, but do re-post if you want more help
with either your existing tool or the correct one.
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
Simon D wrote:

>
> If you do decide to try to use your existing tool, be aware that the force
> required to remove a freewheel is, as Pete has stated, much greater than
> that needed for a cassette. You might end up destroying your tool. (Ouch.)
>


There is only one sure way to remove a freewheel. Put the tool in a
vice, put the wheel on the tool and turn the rim with both hands while
pushing down to break the freewheel free. On a tandem freewheel it
might take two of you to turn the wheel :)

Tony
 
J

JohnB

Guest
Tony Raven wrote:

There is only one sure way to remove a freewheel. Put the tool in a
> vice, put the wheel on the tool and turn the rim with both hands while
> pushing down to break the freewheel free. On a tandem freewheel it
> might take two of you to turn the wheel :)


It can also be useful to put a nut back onto the axle to hold the
removal tool in position just in case it slips out; particularly helpful
if it is not a splined remover, eg an old Regina or Sun Tour with just a
couple of pegs.

John B
 
S

Simon D

Guest
> My Shimano freewheel removal tool also works for removing Hyperglide
> lockrings. Still need a vice and many wellies :)


Yes, I agree. But he doesn't have a Shimano tool.

> Clamp your tool in a vice with its splines pointing up. Engage your
> freewheel on the splines turn the wheel anti clickwise (? is the the right
> direction ? Is been years since I did this). I have done it with a spanner
> and my Dad to help. Dad suffered from ME for years and this 5 minute job
> wrecked him for the rest of the day :-(


You're right about the direction.

If you look at his tool, you'll see that it's not an ideal design for this,
though. The handle is welded to the cylinder, and if a lot of force is
applied (i.e. in a vice) I reckon there's a risk it will break. That's
assuming the splines fit in the first place, and they don't also fail - they
don't look deep enough to be great at removing freewheels.
 
S

Simon D

Guest
"Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Simon D wrote:
>
>>
>> If you do decide to try to use your existing tool, be aware that the
>> force required to remove a freewheel is, as Pete has stated, much greater
>> than that needed for a cassette. You might end up destroying your tool.
>> (Ouch.)

>
> There is only one sure way to remove a freewheel. Put the tool in a vice,
> put the wheel on the tool and turn the rim with both hands while pushing
> down to break the freewheel free. On a tandem freewheel it might take two
> of you to turn the wheel :)
>

See my response to MSeries.
 
S

Simon D

Guest
"JohnB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Tony Raven wrote:
>
> There is only one sure way to remove a freewheel. Put the tool in a
>> vice, put the wheel on the tool and turn the rim with both hands while
>> pushing down to break the freewheel free. On a tandem freewheel it
>> might take two of you to turn the wheel :)

>
> It can also be useful to put a nut back onto the axle to hold the
> removal tool in position just in case it slips out; particularly helpful
> if it is not a splined remover, eg an old Regina or Sun Tour with just a
> couple of pegs.
>

His freewheel is splined, and he's using QR. The tool has a retention
device, but it won't really be adequate for a freewheel.

I don't wish to be rude, but it might be a good idea for people to look at
what he's using (tool & freewheel) before commenting - this guy is going to
be getting seriously confused!
 
J

JohnB

Guest
Simon D wrote:
>
> "JohnB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > Tony Raven wrote:
> >
> > There is only one sure way to remove a freewheel. Put the tool in a
> >> vice, put the wheel on the tool and turn the rim with both hands while
> >> pushing down to break the freewheel free. On a tandem freewheel it
> >> might take two of you to turn the wheel :)

> >
> > It can also be useful to put a nut back onto the axle to hold the
> > removal tool in position just in case it slips out; particularly helpful
> > if it is not a splined remover, eg an old Regina or Sun Tour with just a
> > couple of pegs.
> >

> His freewheel is splined, and he's using QR. The tool has a retention
> device, but it won't really be adequate for a freewheel.
>
> I don't wish to be rude, but it might be a good idea for people to look at
> what he's using (tool & freewheel) before commenting - this guy is going to
> be getting seriously confused!


Yep your right - the thread is starting to drift away from the specific problem.

John B
 
M

m-gineering

Guest
Simon D wrote:

> It's *just* possible that your cassette removal tool *might* still work,
> because the splines are very similar, but it's certainly much safer to have
> the right tool:
>


The Campag end (sic) will just fit the Shimano freewheel splines, but
the Hyperglide tool OD is to large. However the lockringtool probably
won't engage deep enough to work reliably

Get a proper freewheel removal tool, or have the job done by your LBS.
They not only have a large vise, but also a workbench securely bolted to
the floor!

For the difference between cassetets and freewheels:
www.m-gineering.nl/cass3g.htm

--
---
Marten Gerritsen

INFOapestaartjeM-GINEERINGpuntNL
www.m-gineering.nl
 
D

davek

Guest
Pete Biggs wrote:
> Isn't that a *freewheel*?


I thought so too.

In which case, I have found that the best method is to attach hold the
freewheel in a vice (via the appropriate freewheel tool) and unscrew the
wheel, rather than the other way round.

d.
 
T

Tony Raven

Guest
Simon D wrote:

>
> See my response to MSeries.
>
>


With the right tool he'll be fine. The splines don't look substantial
but I've gotten tandem freewheels off with one and tandem freewheels are
screwed on _really_ tight. You do need the right tools though and the
right tools are actually
http://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=5360009211 and a
bench vice.

Tony
 
S

Simon D

Guest
"Tony Raven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> With the right tool he'll be fine. The splines don't look substantial


The tools on the freewheel will certainly be fine - it's the (cassette) tool
to which I was referring.

> but I've gotten tandem freewheels off with one and tandem freewheels are
> screwed on _really_ tight. You do need the right tools though and the
> right tools are actually
> http://www.wiggle.co.uk/v2_product_detail.asp?ProdID=5360009211 and a
> bench vice.
>


You're absolutely right - that's what I thought I'd linked to in my post,
but it looks as though I've somehow posted a link to the (wrong) tool
Stephen's already got. Thanks for correcting me, Tony.