Help - Replace Rear Wheel???

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by dfwx, Mar 13, 2003.

  1. dfwx

    dfwx New Member

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    HELP! This is an "I don't know anything" question. I have had the same Japanese road bike 30+ years. I use bike for commuting, work, pleasure, shopping - since 1970s (Yeah, I am that old and so is this bike...)
    Need to replace wheels. Have no idea if this is hard, easy, impossible or need special tools for rear wheel.
    Do the brand matter? How are gear connected to hub? Etc. Maybe it is simple, maybe impossible - I don't know. I also don't know how many tens of thousands of miles I've put on my Sanwa 10 speed, but I want to keep it.
    Can I replace rear wheel myself and if so, how???
    Please help. I just don't want to start tearing things apart to figure how it works...
    Thanks (LOTS!)
    Mark
     
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  2. rv

    rv New Member

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    avoid the aggravation...go to a lbs with some veteran mechanics. they should recognize your hub and cassette, be able to spec a wheel, and have the tools to do the work.
     
  3. Frejus

    Frejus New Member

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    Your bike should be fitted with a quality threaded rear hub with quick release.

    Also the spacing of your rear dropouts will be 125mm wide which was the industry standard at the time. Campagnolo, Shimano, Suntour, Atom/ Normandy, Zeus were the quality hubs of that era.

    There are still some Nouvo Record Campag hubs about and also Suntour Superbe ones.

    Japanese Sakae still do an excellent threaded hub.

    Sachs still make a range of quality screw-on freewheels in various 6,7,8 speed and ratio's. You will have to replace your chain... a standard Sachs should do it. I would check out your chain wheels to make sure these have not severely worn and have hooked teeth if so replace them or you could end up being a soprano again.

    Front wheel is standard 100mm width.:D
     
  4. dfwx

    dfwx New Member

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    THANKS! I want to save this old bike as it has served me for many years (nearly two decades). I do not care to "restore", but preserve and, ideally, upgrade it functionally.
    I grabbed some old junk bikes people toss at dumpsters and will try disassembling the rear wheel "stuff" (that is the extent of my knowledge). I can probably afford any parts I need - if I do it myself. Limited budget.
    Thanks again!
    Mark
     
  5. psycho.fifer

    psycho.fifer New Member

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    I also have a bike with 125mm space for a rear wheel (7 speed). I foolishly just built myself a new wheel that has a 135mm hub. For years I have used a 130mm wheel (8 speed) that stretches the rear dropouts but 135mm is a stretch to far! I now intend to shorten the spacer from the non drive side of the wheel by 5mm and redish the wheel. I will probably have to cut the quick release spindle as it will be to long. I am also going to telephone a couple of frame renovators and see if it is possible to have my rear triangle stretched to 135mm and re-aligned. Probably not the cheapest option!
     
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