help - salty homemade pizza

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Karen AKA Kajikit, Feb 23, 2005.

  1. I used to make my own pizza all the time in Australia, using tomato
    paste out of a jar, chopped up bacon, ham etc, and topped with grated
    mozzarella cheese. I made exactly the same thing in America and it
    came out inedible because it was so incredibly salty (and I didn't add
    any!) Is there something special I need to buy or use? Does anyone
    have a failproof recipe?
    ~Karen aka Kajikit
    Lover of fine chocolate, fun crafts, and furry felines
    http://www.kajikitscorner.com
    *remove 'nospam' to reply
     
    Tags:


  2. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    "Karen AKA Kajikit" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I used to make my own pizza all the time in Australia, using tomato
    > paste out of a jar,


    What do you call tomato paste back in Australia, meaning ... is it
    the same thing? I would not think of putting that on a pizza.

    > chopped up bacon, ham etc,


    Salt. Salt.

    > and topped with grated
    > mozzarella cheese. I made exactly the same thing in America and it
    > came out inedible because it was so incredibly salty (and I didn't add
    > any!) Is there something special I need to buy or use? Does anyone
    > have a failproof recipe?


    At the very least you need to make or buy pizza sauce. Not paste.
    That's concentrated and you don't use much of it in relation to the
    other ingredients.

    nancy
     
  3. On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 17:34:38 -0500, "Nancy Young"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Karen AKA Kajikit" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >>I used to make my own pizza all the time in Australia, using tomato
    >> paste out of a jar,

    >
    >What do you call tomato paste back in Australia, meaning ... is it
    >the same thing? I would not think of putting that on a pizza.
    >
    >> chopped up bacon, ham etc,

    >
    >Salt. Salt.
    >
    >> and topped with grated
    >> mozzarella cheese. I made exactly the same thing in America and it
    >> came out inedible because it was so incredibly salty (and I didn't add
    >> any!) Is there something special I need to buy or use? Does anyone
    >> have a failproof recipe?

    >
    >At the very least you need to make or buy pizza sauce. Not paste.
    >That's concentrated and you don't use much of it in relation to the
    >other ingredients.


    Recipe please? The tomato paste I always bought was very thick and
    concentrated but they didn't add any salt or anything to it - it was
    just thick concentrated tomato puree... it makes great pizzas!

    Does American mozarella have extra salt added to it? Is there a
    special kind of 'pizza cheese' to use instead?

    ~Karen aka Kajikit
    Lover of fine chocolate, fun crafts, and furry felines
    http://www.kajikitscorner.com
    *remove 'nospam' to reply
     
  4. willyd

    willyd Guest

    In my experience, personal recipes don't always cross borders or oceans
    well. Canned tomato sauce in the US, for example, has a completely
    different taste from the stuff I bought in Germany.


    Karen AKA Kajikit wrote:
    > I used to make my own pizza all the time in Australia, using tomato
    > paste out of a jar, chopped up bacon, ham etc, and topped with grated
    > mozzarella cheese. I made exactly the same thing in America and it
    > came out inedible because it was so incredibly salty (and I didn't

    add
    > any!) Is there something special I need to buy or use? Does anyone
    > have a failproof recipe?
    > ~Karen aka Kajikit
    > Lover of fine chocolate, fun crafts, and furry felines
    > http://www.kajikitscorner.com
    > *remove 'nospam' to reply
     
  5. Most "pizza shop" sauce is simply tomato puree with some tomato paste
    to thicken it up. Add some oregano a bit of sugar and that's it. It's
    thick enough to stay on the pizza without water separating. If you
    don't add the paste the water in the puree will tend to leak to the
    edge of the pizza.

    I can't imagine building a pizza with only tomato paste as a base but
    then I've never tried it.

    As for the salt... as Nancy said above bacon and ham both are high in
    salt. The mozz and tomato may have salt in them too. You may want to
    try again with only a basic pizza - sauce & cheese. If that's not too
    salty then add other things. One other suggestion - use crushed garlic
    and oil as your base instead of red sauce.
     
  6. sf

    sf Guest

    On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 17:26:04 -0500, Karen AKA Kajikit
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > ~Karen aka Kajikit


    Hey! Haven't seen you for a while... what's up?

    > I used to make my own pizza all the time in Australia, using tomato
    > paste out of a jar, chopped up bacon, ham etc, and topped with grated
    > mozzarella cheese. I made exactly the same thing in America and it
    > came out inedible because it was so incredibly salty (and I didn't add
    > any!) Is there something special I need to buy or use?


    First of all, nix the bacon and ham - that's a big salt
    problem.

    My personal problem is that sometimes the tomato is too
    sweet.

    sf
     
  7. Serendipity

    Serendipity Guest

    The Cook wrote:

    > Karen AKA Kajikit <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I used to make my own pizza all the time in Australia, using tomato
    >>paste out of a jar, chopped up bacon, ham etc, and topped with grated
    >>mozzarella cheese. I made exactly the same thing in America and it
    >>came out inedible because it was so incredibly salty (and I didn't add
    >>any!) Is there something special I need to buy or use? Does anyone
    >>have a failproof recipe?
    >>~Karen aka Kajikit
    >>Lover of fine chocolate, fun crafts, and furry felines
    >>http://www.kajikitscorner.com
    >>*remove 'nospam' to reply

    >
    >
    > You probably should start reading the ingredients list on the products
    > to make sure that they are what you expect. Buy 1, taste it. If you
    > do not like it, toss it and look for something else. Better to toss 1
    > can of something than to ruin a dish. BTW, Hunt makes a line of "no
    > salt added" tomato products. Look for them.
    >

    Very good advice! I use a home canned pizza sauce (Bernardin recipe).
    I eliminated the salt because we are watching our sodium intake. BTW,
    if you home can, you can control the sodium by either reducing it or
    eliminating it entirely depending on your tastes. Commercial tomato
    paste contains about 30 g of sodium for 5.5 oz can. That is the small
    can. That is a fair amount of sodium if a whole can of paste was used.
    Sodium reduced mozzarella cheese is available as is low sodium ham and
    bacon. At least it is available here. So the same pizza made with
    sodium reduced products would taste less salty and be better for you.
     
  8. Lena B Katz

    Lena B Katz Guest

    On Thu, 24 Feb 2005, Serendipity wrote:

    > The Cook wrote:
    >
    >> Karen AKA Kajikit <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> I used to make my own pizza all the time in Australia, using tomato
    >>> paste out of a jar, chopped up bacon, ham etc, and topped with grated
    >>> mozzarella cheese. I made exactly the same thing in America and it
    >>> came out inedible because it was so incredibly salty (and I didn't add
    >>> any!) Is there something special I need to buy or use? Does anyone
    >>> have a failproof recipe? ~Karen aka Kajikit
    >>> Lover of fine chocolate, fun crafts, and furry felines
    >>> http://www.kajikitscorner.com
    >>> *remove 'nospam' to reply

    >>
    >>
    >> You probably should start reading the ingredients list on the products
    >> to make sure that they are what you expect. Buy 1, taste it. If you
    >> do not like it, toss it and look for something else. Better to toss 1
    >> can of something than to ruin a dish. BTW, Hunt makes a line of "no
    >> salt added" tomato products. Look for them.
    >>

    > Very good advice! I use a home canned pizza sauce (Bernardin recipe). I
    > eliminated the salt because we are watching our sodium intake. BTW, if you
    > home can, you can control the sodium by either reducing it or eliminating it
    > entirely depending on your tastes. Commercial tomato paste contains about 30
    > g of sodium for 5.5 oz can. That is the small can. That is a fair amount of
    > sodium if a whole can of paste was used. Sodium reduced mozzarella cheese is
    > available as is low sodium ham and bacon. At least it is available here. So
    > the same pizza made with sodium reduced products would taste less salty and
    > be better for you.


    only if you've got high blood pressure.

    anyone know whether salt increases blood pressure for those with low blood
    pressure?

    lena
     
  9. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Serendipity says:
    >
    > the same pizza made with sodium reduced products would taste less

    salty and
    > be better for you.


    only if you've got high blood pressure.

    lena


    That's not true. There are many human conditions that have nothing to
    do with blood pressure where exess salt should be avoided. My blood
    pressure is completely normal, in fact it's generally on the low end of
    normal, but I have edema and COPD, excess dietary salt exascerbates
    both.
     
  10. Lena B Katz wrote:

    > On Thu, 24 Feb 2005, Serendipity wrote:
    >
    >> The Cook wrote:
    >>
    >>> Karen AKA Kajikit <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I used to make my own pizza all the time in Australia, using tomato
    >>>> paste out of a jar, chopped up bacon, ham etc, and topped with grated
    >>>> mozzarella cheese. I made exactly the same thing in America and it
    >>>> came out inedible because it was so incredibly salty (and I didn't add
    >>>> any!) Is there something special I need to buy or use? Does anyone
    >>>> have a failproof recipe? ~Karen aka Kajikit
    >>>> Lover of fine chocolate, fun crafts, and furry felines
    >>>> http://www.kajikitscorner.com
    >>>> *remove 'nospam' to reply
    >>>
    >>> You probably should start reading the ingredients list on the products
    >>> to make sure that they are what you expect. Buy 1, taste it. If you
    >>> do not like it, toss it and look for something else. Better to toss 1
    >>> can of something than to ruin a dish. BTW, Hunt makes a line of "no
    >>> salt added" tomato products. Look for them.
    >>>

    >> Very good advice! I use a home canned pizza sauce (Bernardin recipe).
    >> I eliminated the salt because we are watching our sodium intake. BTW,
    >> if you home can, you can control the sodium by either reducing it or
    >> eliminating it entirely depending on your tastes. Commercial tomato
    >> paste contains about 30 g of sodium for 5.5 oz can. That is the small
    >> can. That is a fair amount of sodium if a whole can of paste was
    >> used. Sodium reduced mozzarella cheese is available as is low sodium
    >> ham and bacon. At least it is available here. So the same pizza made
    >> with sodium reduced products would taste less salty and be better for
    >> you.

    >
    > only if you've got high blood pressure.
    >
    > anyone know whether salt increases blood pressure for those with low
    > blood pressure?


    Salt will only have import for the minority of people who are
    salt-sensitive. For everybody else, it doesn't much matter. Without
    knowing which you are, it's not possible to answer.

    Check out a study called "Intersalt" that's been around for about a
    decade and a half. Says it all.

    Pastorio
     
  11. Serendipity wrote:

    > Commercial tomato paste contains about 30 g of sodium for 5.5 oz can.
    > That is the small can. That is a fair amount of sodium if a whole can
    > of paste was used.



    <delurk>

    Um, Serendipity, not to nitpick but I think that should read 30 mg
    (milligrams). I just got out a can of Unico tomato paste, and the
    ingredients are: tomatoes. Nothing else.

    It then goes on to say that there are 11 mg of sodium per serving, but
    it doesn't define a "serving". And I assume that those 11 mg of sodium
    come from the tomatoes naturally.

    If it was 30 *grams* of sodium, that would be about 1/5 of the contents
    of the can!

    That is all. Carry on :)

    Jo Annne

    </delurk>
     
  12. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Jo Anne Slaven wrote:
    > Serendipity wrote:
    >
    > > Commercial tomato paste contains about 30 g of sodium for 5.5 oz

    can.
    > > That is the small can. That is a fair amount of sodium if a whole

    can
    > > of paste was used.

    >
    >
    > <delurk>
    >
    > Um, Serendipity, not to nitpick but I think that should read 30 mg
    > (milligrams). I just got out a can of Unico tomato paste, and the
    > ingredients are: tomatoes. Nothing else.
    >
    > It then goes on to say that there are 11 mg of sodium per serving,

    but
    > it doesn't define a "serving". And I assume that those 11 mg of

    sodium
    > come from the tomatoes naturally.
    >
    > If it was 30 *grams* of sodium, that would be about 1/5 of the

    contents
    > of the can!


    Contadina Tomato Paste (6oz can)

    Ingredients: 100% Tomatoes (no added salt)

    Nutrition facts...
    20 mg sodium/serving - serving = 2 Tbsps (33g)
    Approx 5 servings/can or 100 mg sodium per can.

    ---
     
  13. Serendipity

    Serendipity Guest

    Jo Anne Slaven wrote:

    > Serendipity wrote:
    >
    >> Commercial tomato paste contains about 30 g of sodium for 5.5 oz can.
    >> That is the small can. That is a fair amount of sodium if a whole can
    >> of paste was used.

    >
    >
    >
    > <delurk>
    >
    > Um, Serendipity, not to nitpick but I think that should read 30 mg
    > (milligrams). I just got out a can of Unico tomato paste, and the
    > ingredients are: tomatoes. Nothing else.


    Nitpick away, I don't mind :) Yes, you are quite correct. It should be
    mg not g.
    >
    > It then goes on to say that there are 11 mg of sodium per serving, but
    > it doesn't define a "serving". And I assume that those 11 mg of sodium
    > come from the tomatoes naturally.


    I suspect you are correct given the tomato paste is so condensed and if
    the product only contains tomatoes, that's the only place it could come
    from. Looking at Book of Food Counts shows 11 mg sodium for a 4.75 oz
    raw tomato. Bernardin's recipe for tomato paste adds 1 tsp salt for 9 -
    250 ml jar batch. I honestly don't know if commercial canners add salt
    or not to their tomato paste. I suspect there are low sodium versions
    but haven't checked.
    >
    > If it was 30 *grams* of sodium, that would be about 1/5 of the contents
    > of the can!
    >
    > That is all. Carry on :)
    >
    > Jo Annne
    >
    > </delurk>
    >
     
  14. Dawn

    Dawn Guest

    Karen AKA Kajikit wrote:

    > The tomato paste I always bought was very thick and
    > concentrated but they didn't add any salt or anything to it - it was
    > just thick concentrated tomato puree... it makes great pizzas!


    Tomato paste in the US often has salt added to it. I think the Contadina
    brand has the lowest sodium of the brands in this area. You might
    compare labels.

    >
    > Does American mozarella have extra salt added to it? Is there a
    > special kind of 'pizza cheese' to use instead?


    Try to find anything that doesn't have salt added to it...

    Some mozzarella here is good and some is awful, you'll have to find a
    brand you like.

    You might also check the meats you use.




    Dawn
     
  15. -L.

    -L. Guest

    Karen AKA Kajikit wrote:
    > I used to make my own pizza all the time in Australia, using tomato
    > paste out of a jar, chopped up bacon, ham etc, and topped with grated
    > mozzarella cheese. I made exactly the same thing in America and it
    > came out inedible because it was so incredibly salty (and I didn't

    add
    > any!) Is there something special I need to buy or use? Does anyone
    > have a failproof recipe?
    > ~Karen aka Kajikit


    It's almost always the cheese. Especially if it was part-skim
    mozarella. I don't use pure paste - I make sauce from veggies and
    canned tomatoes (salt-free), tomato puree (salt-free) and paste.

    -L.
     
  16. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    I don't use pure paste - I make sauce from veggies and
    canned tomatoes (salt-free), tomato puree (salt-free).

    -L.


    No such thing as tomatoes (salt-free).
     
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