help setting up newbies new bike with parts and clothing.

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by wurtulla wabbit, Apr 22, 2012.

  1. wurtulla wabbit

    wurtulla wabbit New Member

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    Well, hello,just a bit of back ground.
    10-17, raced BMX fairly heavily in UK
    17-35, nothing other than family and general working life,
    35-39, street bike and tarmac riding with kids and wife on MTB and retro BMX (old fully restored pink haro master) forfun and mono's etc.
    40 now, bought a 2010 BMC SLC01 and was given pedals and shoes with it but will need to buy new ones soon as they're fairly well used.

    I have no other road gear and looking for lighting and tacho, not into gadget riding, just bare bones.
    Any help on selecting gear to compliment this bike and not rip my savings apart would be well received ! :)
     
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  2. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    You know, that's almost impossible to provide a decent answer to that. Personal opinion varies too much. What some people would see as perfectly OK, others would think to be way below a "real" rider.
    Lights is another issue. To be legal doesn't take much. To actually be able to ride at speed, at "any" stretch of road, you need a lot more.

    For cyclocomputers I have used everything from a Tony the Tiger promo that I've got from collecting coupons to fairly snazzy crosstrainer heart rate monitors.
    Guess what, they all work.
    From a cost perspective, I think it's a tie. A more expensive one might outlast a cheaper one, but divided over time they'll both come out even.

    I'd start with helmet, vi-viz vest, puncture repair kit.

    Wiggle and CRC are decent UK suppliers.
     
  3. wurtulla wabbit

    wurtulla wabbit New Member

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    I intend to ride during daylight and twilight at very latest. More for safety than vision. As for gear, looking at 105 pedals, on eBay at 65 bucks posted. Shoes however, are harder to gauge. I am into light weight and cooling. Being a scot in oz, the winters don't faze me at all. More of a social rider these days with my mate who has just bought an addict 3 and is doing cairns to cooktown run later in year so we will be cutting some laps locally around the kawana,wurtulla, Caloundra area so if you take this info into account, what would you suggest. Ps, can get stuff over from UK if they won't post international.
     
  4. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    Shimano 105 is a dedicated road pedal. It's definitely OK, but it'll force you to hobble around if ever you would get the idea to walk any kind of distance off the bike.

    There is a place for road pedals,sure. But IMO the benefit doesn't really show until you're talking about hours of continuous high effort. For anything less dedicated than that I'd suggest MTB-style spd and shoes. For cooling, spds would even allow you to use spinning(=indoor) shoes. And short of getting spd-compatible sandals, you don't get more ventilation than that.

    As a car driver my vote is for hi-viz clothing and reflectors. To me, there's nothing that yells "human ahead" as clearly as when a recognisable torso shape appears in the reflection of the headlights. Plenty of hi-viz jackets and vests to choose from.
    As a car driver, flashing lights don't add anything useful to my perception. Headlights + reflectors gives ample detection range and a clearer identification
    As a cyclist, I don't like flashing lights. Cyclist to cyclist, the approach speed usually isn't high enough to be an issue, I don't need the added detection range that a blinky may provide. And when I get closer, all the blinky does is make it harder to pinpoint the precise location. If there's a bit of fog/haze/rain in the air, and maybe even on my glasses, the blinkies are even worse.

    Dealextreme.com has a decent range of LED bike lights incl chargers. Here's an example:http://www.dealextreme.com/p/mj-808e-ha-iii-cree-xm-lt60-3-mode-1000-lumen-led-bike-light-set-4x18650-57100
    Or you can get one of those glorified rubber bands and the Mag-Lite (clone) of your choice and strap it to your handlebar or head tube. http://www.dealextreme.com/p/universal-bike-bicycle-silicone-holding-elastic-strap-for-flashlight-cell-phone-68460

    Clothes in general, I don't see anything wrong in starting at the inexpensive range. If they fit OK you can always wear them until they're worn out. If they don't fit it doesn't really matter how durable they might have been. Inexpensive stuff will allow for more experimentation in sleeve/leg length, suspenders or not, that kind of thing.
     
  5. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    FYI. Other than a cosmetic issue, you can use a pair of cycling shoes until the uppers have separated from the soles ... presuming they fit YOUR feet, that is.

    The footbed liner can be washed OR replaced.

    Since the light is to increase your bikes visibility rather than to light the roadway, consider using eBay to buy an inexpensive LED lightset from HK (under $10). The "strobe" setting makes a 'small' light very visible ... at least, IMO.

    CATEYE make many of the "private label" cyclocomputers (including Shimano's & Campagnolo's), so just look at the backside (or, box) to see who makes it. A C2052 battery is common ... at least, it was a commonly used size. Some cyclocomputers may use OTHER sizes ... consider battery availability if the unit you are looking at uses a different size battery.
     
  6. wurtulla wabbit

    wurtulla wabbit New Member

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    Great info thanks, I'll take it on board. Shoes that are free with bike are decent Scott carbon ones but told they move about a bit due to worn pad on centre of pedal. Pretty sure theyre 540's and local shop said they can't be replaced ? Might just leave them on for a bit as they are right size for me and fit fine. Any old sport socks do ? Also, found a BMC bib/knick/jersey combo on torpedo 7 for $139.00 and speedo /heart monitor computer watch for $49.00 which seem reasonable ? It's replica but cheap bling and functional so that leaves a lid. Suggestions ??
     
  7. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    I can't imagine what is worn out on your pedal which can't be replaced ...

    If you can, post a picture.
     
  8. wurtulla wabbit

    wurtulla wabbit New Member

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    Looks like a little thin rubber /plastic insert that shoe sole sits on. Along spindle axis on pedal.
     
  9. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    YOU can replace that "piece" as a DIY project if you have a single-sided razor blade (or equivalent) ...

    • SCRAPE-or-PEEL out the "worn" piece remove any residual adhesive
    • Using a piece of copy paper (or, junk mail insert), make a "rubbing"
    [*] TAPE the rubbing onto a piece of a plastic laundry jug or other non-clear plastic bottle & cut out the "new" insert (use Fiskar-type scissors OR if you have a deft hand then you can use an X-acto type knife or the single-sided razor blade which you used to remove the original piece)
    [*]
    • dry fit ...
    • if the plastic you chose is too thick, you can either thin it mechanically by rubbing it with some coarse (e.g., 80 grit) sandpaper OR choose a thinner plastic bottle
    • you'll probably want to rough up the side which you will "glue" to the pedal
    [*] GLUE in place with a thin layer of contact cement, GOOP, SHOE GO, tub-and-tile latex, etc ...

    REPEAT for the other pedal.

    DONE!
     
  10. wurtulla wabbit

    wurtulla wabbit New Member

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    Yep ,that's the bit. Will use your idea ! :) Biggest worry, right hand rear brake. Surely that's very wrong ? It'll end up in a very bad endo or a really spectacular mono that will end up in a back flip due to wrong lever selection ! :D Funny now thinking about it but not a good scenario at any Klms. Is this normal these days on race bikes or unintentionally wrongly setup ( I am hoping not the latter ) but neither is good for me.:( Shoes are Scott carbo TRI and are real light and buckets loads of mesh. I'll scrub them up and wash insole as they're a decent fit and broken In already :) Pedals are pd7750's and about to fix them up now :)
     
  11. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    You can run your brake cables to which ever side you want: from the left shifter to the rear brake and from the right shifter to the front brake ("European" routing) or from the right shifter to the rear brake and from the left shifter to the front brake. It doesn't matter at all since the brake levers don't know which brake they're actually, uhm, actuating. Sheldon Brown (RIP, Sheldon) said the rule was to control the rear brake with the brake lever on the same side as the side of the road on which you pedal (i.e., if you ride/drive on the right side of the road, as in the US, then the right lever should control the rear lever). Frankly, I think you should do whatever is comfortable for you. Which brake cable routing method the pro riders use is dependent on the rider. Like a lot of things in cycling, what's best comes down to personal preference, even something like cable routing. As with most things Shimano, the 7750 pedals (old style Dura Ace.....before Shimano went wide with their road pedals) last a very long time. Their only downsides are that their platform isn't quite as wide as modern Shimano pedals, and they're a bit heavier than standard pedals. From what you wrote, the weight wouldn't seem to really factor in (and some would say that it doesn't really factor in, no matter what), and some folks aren't necessarily sold on the idea that wider pedals are better. Consider pedal width to be a personal preference thing for now. If I were you I'd consider getting a light that is capable of doing more than just letting you be seen. Yes, such a light will cost a bit more (or maybe a lot more, depending on the light in question), but such a light can be used for both seeing and being seen, while the "just be seen" light won't be helpful for you if you want to actually see. There are scads of lights putting out 300 - 400 lumens that are pretty inexpensive. Likewise, I'd get a rear light that can be seen from far away. Planet X offers such a rear light, and there are others a lot like the Planet X version. Another thing to consider would be to get reflective ankle straps (they can do double duty and keep your pants leg(s) from getting caught in bike bits, particularly you chainrings.) and possibly wrist straps. I'd also consider getting some reflective tape because while it's important to be seen from the front and back, it's especially important to be seen from the sides. I use a black reflective tape I got from Performance Bike. I've got bits of it on my rims, on the left and right aspects of my top tube, down tube, seat tube, chain stays, seat stays, and fork. Yeah, my bike is black so the tape blends in nicely, but I'm not so concerned about how my bike looks as I am considered about not having to exchange energy and momentum with a car, while riding at night ( I sometimes do training rides at night. The heat in the Arizona desert during the day can be tad stifling or a wee bit soul crushing). A bike computer can be had very cheap (for as little as $15-$20 US). Note that if you need to see the computer at night, you'll need to find one with a backlight. No matter the case, you can find inexpensive computer that will only give you the basics: speed, time of day, duration of your ride.......I think such computer could pass the "no gadget riding" test. Don't be alarmed, however, if sometime down the road, cycling sinks it's suckers deep into your veins, takes hold of your mind, and forces you to buy more stuff. It's like internet porn that way. No matter what, enjoy your riding.
     
  12. wurtulla wabbit

    wurtulla wabbit New Member

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    Thanks, I'll change the brake. Too many other bikes and ride dirt bikes so need right hand front for "those moments". Thanks for the great post and although QLD summer is 90%+ humidity and occasionally 40+ Celsius, I still have no. Interest in night riding (yet). Will swap out pedals as I've been in garage trying to strip old plastic off and it's part of an insert and for 65 bucks, I can't be arsed. :D Off shopping tomorrow if shops are open on Anzac day. Ps, found some "Monton" brand bib and jersey combos with gel inserts. Are they shite ? :rolleyes:
     
  13. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Ah Monton. That guy that's been spamming the site about his "business" does get around. It's likely all of the stuff is counterfeit copies of the real thing. I highly doubt Monton pays licensing fees to anyone. I can just about guarantee, for example, that zero percent of their money goes to Livestrong. Likewise, I think their "sales" are scams. I'd not be surprised to find out their "sale" price is the regular price and that the other price listed was just made up to make their "sale" price look better. The fact that they don't give a physical address or phone number should be a warning sign. I'd shop at Nashbar before I'd shop at Monton, and I don't shop at Nashbar anymore. Note that's not supposed to be a slight against Nashbar or people who shop at Nashbar.
     
  14. wurtulla wabbit

    wurtulla wabbit New Member

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    The monton stuff is from a huge eBay seller. Has thousands of sales.
     
  15. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Yep: thousands of sales of counterfeit goods.
     
  16. wurtulla wabbit

    wurtulla wabbit New Member

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    Are they shit or worth a go for a newbie ? Australian bike clothing outlet also has a replica bib/jersey kit for $139.00 and hincapie stuff for lots more. Wondering if the relics stuff is just same as the eBay gear ?
     
  17. wurtulla wabbit

    wurtulla wabbit New Member

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    Took note of my gearing as I thought it had a pretty narrow spread. Is it setup for more flatter open riding or am I miles out ? 39/53 front, 11/12/13/14/15/16/17/19/21/23 on rear. 53 has some chipped teeth/wear as does the 17t rear but seems to shift ok still. Had a little scoot on it yesterday, rides beautifully.
     
  18. sitzmark

    sitzmark Member

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    Depends, but in general - yes.

    53t may be as designed. Pretty typical for a tooth or two in proximity to the pins/ramps to be different shape to help chain transfer. Many rear cassette cogs have different tooth shapes for the same reason.
     
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