Help - Shimano gear block removal without special tool?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Colin McKenzie, Jun 15, 2003.

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  1. Hi, bike experts.

    Due to a banana-shaped wheel and an overworked bike shop, I need to transfer a Shimano blick of
    gears from one wheel to another - preferably in time for tomorrow (Monday)'s commute.

    I understand I have to unscrew a metal cap which has a hole in the middle with little round
    notches in it.

    Is this a right-hand thread? Does it unscrew relative to the cogs, or do they all turn together?

    I removed the axle, but that didn't seem to help.

    Ideas?

    TIA

    Colin McKenzieo
     
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  2. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    Colin McKenzie wrote:
    > I understand I have to unscrew a metal cap which has a hole in the middle with little round
    > notches in it.

    Thats the puppy.

    > Is this a right-hand thread?

    Yes.

    > Does it unscrew relative to the cogs, or do they all turn together?

    You have to hold the cogs steady to unscrew it, usually using a chain whip.

    > I removed the axle, but that didn't seem to help.

    It does help if you are going to use the Shimano cassette lockring removal tool.

    > Ideas?

    This lockring will be on pretty tight, if it was installed correctly. The correct tools are a real
    advantage in getting these off (Halfords closes shortly on Sundays!). The first movement will sound
    horrendous (like something broke) because the touching surfaces have serations on them to stop it
    coming loose. Make sure to put them back on tight aswell.

    HTH

    --
    Jim Price

    http://www.jimprice.dsl.pipex.com

    Conscientious objection is hard work in an economic war.
     
  3. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    Jim Price wrote:
    > Colin McKenzie wrote:
    >> I removed the axle, but that didn't seem to help.
    >
    >
    > It does help if you are going to use the Shimano cassette lockring removal tool.

    I should have added: If its a solid axle - a quick release axle does not need to be removed.

    --
    Jim Price

    http://www.jimprice.dsl.pipex.com

    Conscientious objection is hard work in an economic war.
     
  4. Jim Price wrote:
    > Colin McKenzie wrote:
    > > Is this a right-hand thread?
    >
    > Yes.
    >
    > > Does it unscrew relative to the cogs, or do they all turn together?
    >
    > You have to hold the cogs steady to unscrew it, usually using a chain whip.
    >
    > > I removed the axle, but that didn't seem to help.
    >
    > It does help if you are going to use the Shimano cassette lockring removal tool.
    >
    > > Ideas?
    >
    > This lockring will be on pretty tight, if it was installed correctly. The correct tools are a real
    > advantage in getting these off (Halfords closes shortly on Sundays!).

    Thank you very much. Additional force will now be applied!

    Colin McKenzie
     
  5. Frank

    Frank Guest

    "Jim Price" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > them to stop it coming loose. Make sure to put them back on tight aswell.
    >
    I don't think it has to be put back on tight, as long as it doesn't work loose its ok. On my bike
    hand tightness has always been fine.
     
  6. The Mark

    The Mark Guest

    Jim Price wrote:
    > Colin McKenzie wrote:
    >> I understand I have to unscrew a metal cap which has a hole in the middle with little round
    >> notches in it.
    >
    > Thats the puppy.
    >
    >> Is this a right-hand thread?
    >
    > Yes.
    >
    >> Does it unscrew relative to the cogs, or do they all turn together?
    >
    > You have to hold the cogs steady to unscrew it, usually using a chain whip.
    >
    >> I removed the axle, but that didn't seem to help.
    >
    > It does help if you are going to use the Shimano cassette lockring removal tool.
    >
    >> Ideas?
    >
    > This lockring will be on pretty tight, if it was installed correctly. The correct tools are a real
    > advantage in getting these off (Halfords closes shortly on Sundays!). The first movement will
    > sound horrendous (like something broke) because the touching surfaces have serations on them to
    > stop it coming loose. Make sure to put them back on tight aswell.

    I've just carried out the above procedure. I needed to change a worn out chain and cassette. This
    is the first time I've ever done it an I was expecting to have to use a lot of force to remove the
    locking ring but no I needed virtually no force at all. The cassette was swapped from a buckled
    wheel last year by Edinburgh cycles and I assumed that because I removed it without much force I
    did not need to put the new one on with much. Should I go back out and get all oily again to
    tighten it up?
    --
    Mark

    I'm getting something special built for me.
     
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