Help, Southern Fried Chops?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Richard'S ~Ja~, Mar 27, 2004.

  1. Hoping someone here can help me with what turned out to be
    bad cooking some time back. In memory of the very good
    seasoned, flour breaded and then fried pork chops my mother
    made years ago, I tried to make them. She may have used a
    tiny bit of garlic, along with just a bit of salt and
    (more) pepper in the flour coating for bone-in pork chops
    she pan-fried that were so very good. Starting with 1"
    thick boneless pork peices and being a rather new and loving-
    them Penzeys spice blends user, I used just the Bavarian
    blend with a little salt and pepper in my flour; I medium-
    fire fried each side (gas stove) in EVO, and they were not
    only less than the "tasty" I expected, they were much too
    dry to enjoy.

    Please, prep and seasoning suggestions here today, and thank
    you so much!

    Picky ~JA~
     
    Tags:


  2. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Richard's ~JA~ wrote:
    > Hoping someone here can help me with what turned out to be
    > bad cooking some time back. In memory of the very good
    > seasoned, flour breaded and then fried pork chops my
    > mother made years ago, I tried to make them. She may have
    > used a tiny bit of garlic, along with just a bit of salt
    > and (more) pepper in the flour coating for bone-in pork
    > chops she pan-fried that were so very good. Starting with
    > 1" thick boneless pork peices and being a rather new and
    > loving-them Penzeys spice blends user, I used just the
    > Bavarian blend with a little salt and pepper in my flour;
    > I medium-fire fried each side (gas stove) in EVO, and they
    > were not only less than the "tasty" I expected, they were
    > much too dry to enjoy.
    >
    > Please, prep and seasoning suggestions here today, and
    > thank you so much!
    >
    > Picky ~JA~

    Well, first of all your mother didn't use 1" thick boneless
    pork. Buy some regular bone-in chops, about 1/2" thick. I
    love Penzey's spices too, but hey, your mom had a method to
    her madness. Season some flour with salt, pepper and some
    garlic powder. Either dredge the chops wet in this mixture
    or perhaps first dip in an egg wash (beaten egg with a
    little water) then dredge. Cook in hot oil until golden
    brown on each side. Good luck!

    Jill
     
  3. Josh

    Josh Guest

    Did your mother deep fry them in oil in the oven, perhaps?
     
  4. To the request for help with southern fried pork chops,
    [email protected] replies....
    >Well, first of all your mother didn't use 1" thick boneless
    >pork. Buy some regular bone-in chops, about 1/2" thick. I
    >love Penzey's spices too, but hey, your mom had a method to
    >her madness.
    I've learned from an especially good "old fashioned" cooking
    friend tonight exactly that, 'twas the need for less
    thickness and especially the bone-in chops. She stated that
    the boneless are better used in other ways and will most
    always become too dry when fried. So, because these are the
    cut I have already in wait for cooking, I opened my book of
    prints from this group to find Pastorio's tell of brining
    meats. The tomorrow to be fried boneless cuts are now in the
    refrigerator soaking up flavorings and moisture in hope that
    a dry wipe and flour dredge tomorrow may see them fried more
    juicy than my last attempt.
    >Season some flour with salt, pepper and some garlic powder.
    >Either dredge the chops wet in this mixture or perhaps
    >first dip in an egg wash (beaten egg with a little water)
    >then dredge. Cook in hot oil until golden brown on each
    >side. Good luck!
    Exactly my plan for tomorrow, minus the egg wash, and thank
    you so much for the memory jogging input, JMcQ!

    Picky ~JA~
     
  5. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Richard's ~JA~ wrote:
    > To the request for help with southern fried pork chops,
    > [email protected] replies....
    >> Well, first of all your mother didn't use 1" thick
    >> boneless pork. Buy some regular bone-in chops, about 1/2"
    >> thick. I love Penzey's spices too, but hey, your mom had
    >> a method to her madness.
    > I've learned from an especially good "old fashioned"
    > cooking friend tonight exactly that, 'twas the need for
    > less thickness and especially the bone-in chops. She
    > stated that the boneless are better used in other ways and
    > will most always become too dry when fried. So, because
    > these are the cut I have already in wait for cooking, I
    > opened my book of prints from this group to find
    > Pastorio's tell of brining meats. The tomorrow to be fried
    > boneless cuts are now in the refrigerator soaking up
    > flavorings and moisture in hope that a dry wipe and flour
    > dredge tomorrow may see them fried more juicy than my last
    > attempt.
    >> Season some flour with salt, pepper and some garlic
    >> powder. Either dredge the chops wet in this mixture or
    >> perhaps first dip in an egg wash (beaten egg with a
    >> little water) then dredge. Cook in hot oil until golden
    >> brown on each side. Good luck!
    > Exactly my plan for tomorrow, minus the egg wash, and
    > thank you so much for the memory jogging input, JMcQ!
    >
    > Picky ~JA~

    You are quite welcome :) Hopefully you will enjoy the chops!

    I use the boneless chops like chicken or turkey medallions;
    I pound them flat, salt & pepper; quickly pan sear them in
    butter and olive oil; add garlic and onion, some white wine;
    simmer to reduce the liquid and cook through. Sprinkle with
    chopped parsley and add some lemon slices or zest.

    Jill
     
  6. Pizen

    Pizen Guest

    That sounds good, but it is about as Southern as an egg
    cream. Traditionally we use thin (1/2 inch or so) bone-in
    chops, season them well, dip into an egg wash, and then
    dredge through flour. You can season the flour, but I think
    sometimes that burns too easily. Shake the excess off and
    fry until golden brown. Momma used lard or Crisco, but I
    don't think you have to be that literal.

    The egg wash is optional as well. I think the best chops
    I ever had were simply seasoned with salt and pepper,
    dusted with flour, and fried. Simple, yet unbelievably
    good. Good luck!

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Richard's ~JA~ wrote:
    > > To the request for help with southern fried pork chops,
    > > [email protected] replies....
    > >> Well, first of all your mother didn't use 1" thick
    > >> boneless pork. Buy some regular bone-in chops, about
    > >> 1/2" thick. I love Penzey's spices too, but hey, your
    > >> mom had a method to her madness.
    > > I've learned from an especially good "old fashioned"
    > > cooking friend tonight exactly that, 'twas the need for
    > > less thickness and especially the bone-in chops. She
    > > stated that the boneless are better used in other ways
    > > and will most always become too dry when fried. So,
    > > because these are the cut I have already in wait for
    > > cooking, I opened my book of prints from this group to
    > > find Pastorio's tell of brining meats. The tomorrow to
    > > be fried boneless cuts are now in the refrigerator
    > > soaking up flavorings and moisture in hope that a dry
    > > wipe and flour dredge tomorrow may see them fried more
    > > juicy than my last attempt.
    > >> Season some flour with salt, pepper and some garlic
    > >> powder. Either dredge the chops wet in this mixture or
    > >> perhaps first dip in an egg wash (beaten egg with a
    > >> little water) then dredge. Cook in hot oil until golden
    > >> brown on each side. Good luck!
    > > Exactly my plan for tomorrow, minus the egg wash, and
    > > thank you so much for the memory jogging input, JMcQ!
    > >
    > > Picky ~JA~
    >
    > You are quite welcome :) Hopefully you will enjoy
    > the chops!
    >
    > I use the boneless chops like chicken or turkey
    > medallions; I pound them flat, salt & pepper; quickly pan
    > sear them in butter and olive oil; add garlic and onion,
    > some white wine; simmer to reduce the liquid and cook
    > through. Sprinkle with chopped parsley and add some lemon
    > slices or zest.
    >
    > Jill
     
  7. Jmcquown

    Jmcquown Guest

    Pizen wrote:
    > That sounds good, but it is about as Southern as an
    > egg cream.

    Hey, I never said the boneless chops were 'Southern' :)

    > Traditionally we use thin (1/2 inch or so) bone-in chops,
    > season them well, dip into an egg wash, and then dredge
    > through flour. You can season the flour, but I think
    > sometimes that burns too easily. Shake the excess off and
    > fry until golden brown. Momma used lard or Crisco, but I
    > don't think you have to be that literal.

    Nope, corn oil or canola oil works just as well :)

    > The egg wash is optional as well. I think the best chops I
    > ever had were simply seasoned with salt and pepper, dusted
    > with flour, and fried. Simple, yet unbelievably good. Good
    > luck! "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> Richard's ~JA~ wrote:
    >>> To the request for help with southern fried pork chops,
    >>> [email protected] replies....
    >>>> Well, first of all your mother didn't use 1" thick
    >>>> boneless pork. Buy some regular bone-in chops, about
    >>>> 1/2" thick. I love Penzey's spices too, but hey, your
    >>>> mom had a method to her madness.
    >>> I've learned from an especially good "old fashioned"
    >>> cooking friend tonight exactly that, 'twas the need for
    >>> less thickness and especially the bone-in chops. She
    >>> stated that the boneless are better used in other ways
    >>> and will most always become too dry when fried. So,
    >>> because these are the cut I have already in wait for
    >>> cooking, I opened my book of prints from this group to
    >>> find Pastorio's tell of brining meats. The tomorrow to
    >>> be fried boneless cuts are now in the refrigerator
    >>> soaking up flavorings and moisture in hope that a dry
    >>> wipe and flour dredge tomorrow may see them fried more
    >>> juicy than my last attempt.
    >>>> Season some flour with salt, pepper and some garlic
    >>>> powder. Either dredge the chops wet in this mixture or
    >>>> perhaps first dip in an egg wash (beaten egg with a
    >>>> little water) then dredge. Cook in hot oil until golden
    >>>> brown on each side. Good luck!
    >>> Exactly my plan for tomorrow, minus the egg wash, and
    >>> thank you so much for the memory jogging input, JMcQ!
    >>>
    >>> Picky ~JA~
    >>
    >> You are quite welcome :) Hopefully you will enjoy
    >> the chops!
    >>
    >> I use the boneless chops like chicken or turkey
    >> medallions; I pound them flat, salt & pepper; quickly pan
    >> sear them in butter and olive oil; add garlic and onion,
    >> some white wine; simmer to reduce the liquid and cook
    >> through. Sprinkle with chopped parsley and add some lemon
    >> slices or zest.
    >>
    >> Jill
     
  8. Katra

    Katra Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Pizen wrote:
    > > That sounds good, but it is about as Southern as an egg
    > > cream.
    >
    > Hey, I never said the boneless chops were 'Southern' :)
    >
    > > Traditionally we use thin (1/2 inch or so) bone-in
    > > chops, season them well, dip into an egg wash, and then
    > > dredge through flour. You can season the flour, but I
    > > think sometimes that burns too easily. Shake the excess
    > > off and fry until golden brown. Momma used lard or
    > > Crisco, but I don't think you have to be that literal.
    >
    > Nope, corn oil or canola oil works just as well :)
    >

    EVOO! ;-)

    --
    Sprout the Mung Bean to reply...

    "There are many intelligent species in the universe, and
    they are all owned by cats! -- Asimov

    >,,<Cat's Haven Hobby Farm>,,<Katraatcenturyteldotnet>,,<
    http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewSellersOtherItems-
    &include=0&userid=katra
     
  9. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    Pizen wrote:
    >
    > That sounds good, but it is about as Southern as an
    > egg cream.

    Argh. I got a craving for an egg cream last week when he
    introduced his Texan girlfriend to one (she tried it with
    trepidation and pronounced it ... Hey, it's good! like
    generations of New Yorkers could be wrong?) ... now you
    had to bring it up again. I must get to the store for
    Fox's U Bet!!!

    nancy
     
  10. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    Richard's ~JA~ wrote:
    >
    > Hoping someone here can help me with what turned out to be
    > bad cooking some time back. In memory of the very good
    > seasoned, flour breaded and then fried pork chops my
    > mother made years ago, I tried to make them. She may have
    > used a tiny bit of garlic, along with just a bit of salt
    > and (more) pepper in the flour coating for bone-in pork
    > chops she pan-fried that were so very good. Starting with
    > 1" thick boneless pork peices and being a rather new and
    > loving-them Penzeys spice blends user, I used just the
    > Bavarian blend with a little salt and pepper in my flour;
    > I medium-fire fried each side (gas stove) in EVO, and they
    > were not only less than the "tasty" I expected, they were
    > much too dry to enjoy.
    >
    > Please, prep and seasoning suggestions here today, and
    > thank you so much!
    >
    > Picky ~JA~

    Try using pork chops with the bone in. The water-injected
    boneless pork 'steaks' most US supermarkets carry will
    nearly always cook up dry.
     
  11. Kilikini

    Kilikini Guest

    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Pizen wrote:
    > >
    > > That sounds good, but it is about as Southern as an egg
    > > cream.
    >
    > Argh. I got a craving for an egg cream last week when he
    > introduced his Texan girlfriend to one (she tried it with
    > trepidation and pronounced it ... Hey, it's good! like
    > generations of New Yorkers could be wrong?) ... now you
    > had to bring it up again. I must get to the store for
    > Fox's U Bet!!!
    >
    > nancy

    Okay, gotta ask.........What in the hell is an egg
    cream? kili
     
  12. Sheryl Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    in article [email protected], Nancy Young at
    [email protected] wrote on 3/28/04 10:42 AM:

    > Pizen wrote:
    >>
    >> That sounds good, but it is about as Southern as an
    >> egg cream.
    >
    > Argh. I got a craving for an egg cream last week when he
    > introduced his Texan girlfriend to one (she tried it with
    > trepidation and pronounced it ... Hey, it's good! like
    > generations of New Yorkers could be wrong?) ... now you
    > had to bring it up again. I must get to the store for
    > Fox's U Bet!!!
    >
    > nancy

    Saw it yesterday in a squeeze plastic bottle. I was highly
    offended! Although, it is infinitely easier to control.
    Still...UBet needs to come from a jar. I never did send away
    for the pump thingy for it.

    Now, the jar may be history. Which means the one in my
    fridge may be collectible!!! LOL

    I don't use it often, and a jar can last me 2 years,
    but there is always a jar of it in my fridge. Always
    was, growing up. Even in college, I had a jar of Ubet
    in the fridge.
     
  13. Sheryl Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    in article [email protected], kilikini at
    [email protected] wrote on 3/28/04 11:35 AM:

    >
    > "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> Pizen wrote:
    >>>
    >>> That sounds good, but it is about as Southern as an egg
    >>> cream.
    >>
    >> Argh. I got a craving for an egg cream last week when he
    >> introduced his Texan girlfriend to one (she tried it with
    >> trepidation and pronounced it ... Hey, it's good! like
    >> generations of New Yorkers could be wrong?) ... now you
    >> had to bring it up again. I must get to the store for
    >> Fox's U Bet!!!
    >>
    >> nancy
    >
    > Okay, gotta ask.........What in the hell is an egg
    > cream? kili
    >
    >

    go here: http://www.foxs-syrups.com/egg_cream.html

    and read for yourself!!!
     
  14. Nancy Young

    Nancy Young Guest

    Sheryl Rosen wrote:

    > [email protected] wrote on 3/28/04 11:35 AM:

    > >> Argh. I got a craving for an egg cream last week when
    > >> he introduced his Texan girlfriend to one (she tried it
    > >> with trepidation and pronounced it ... Hey, it's good!
    > >> like generations of New Yorkers could be wrong?) ...
    > >> now you had to bring it up again. I must get to the
    > >> store for Fox's U Bet!!!

    > >> nancy
    > >
    > > Okay, gotta ask.........What in the hell is an egg
    > > cream?

    > go here: http://www.foxs-syrups.com/egg_cream.html
    >
    > and read for yourself!!!

    Cute site, Sheryl. I was going to ask you to post the recipe
    as I don't trust my memory.

    nancy
     
  15. T E

    T E Guest

  16. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Sheryl Rosen wrote:
    > in article [email protected],
    > kilikini at [email protected] wrote on 3/28/04
    > 11:35 AM:
    >
    >>
    >> "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]...
    >>> Pizen wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> That sounds good, but it is about as Southern as an egg
    >>>> cream.
    >>>
    >>> Argh. I got a craving for an egg cream last week when he
    >>> introduced his Texan girlfriend to one (she tried it
    >>> with trepidation and pronounced it ... Hey, it's good!
    >>> like generations of New Yorkers could be wrong?) ... now
    >>> you had to bring it up again. I must get to the store
    >>> for Fox's U Bet!!!
    >>>
    >>> nancy
    >>
    >> Okay, gotta ask.........What in the hell is an egg
    >> cream? kili
    >>
    >>
    >
    > go here: http://www.foxs-syrups.com/egg_cream.html
    >
    > and read for yourself!!!

    Thanks for that link! I've never seen (or heard of) egg
    creams except in this newsgroup, and have always (since
    the first thread I read) wanted to try them. The page says
    in Florida, I can find "Fox's U Bet" in Publix
    Supermarkets. I'll have to check. What section of the
    store would I look in?

    BOB
     
  17. Sheryl Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    in article [email protected], Nancy Young at
    [email protected] wrote on 3/28/04 12:39 PM:

    > Sheryl Rosen wrote:
    >
    >> [email protected] wrote on 3/28/04 11:35 AM:
    >
    >>>> Argh. I got a craving for an egg cream last week when
    >>>> he introduced his Texan girlfriend to one (she tried it
    >>>> with trepidation and pronounced it ... Hey, it's good!
    >>>> like generations of New Yorkers could be wrong?) ...
    >>>> now you had to bring it up again. I must get to the
    >>>> store for Fox's U Bet!!!
    >
    >>>> nancy
    >>>
    >>> Okay, gotta ask.........What in the hell is an egg
    >>> cream?
    >
    >> go here: http://www.foxs-syrups.com/egg_cream.html
    >>
    >> and read for yourself!!!
    >
    > Cute site, Sheryl. I was going to ask you to post the
    > recipe as I don't trust my memory.
    >
    > nancy

    It's basically 3 ingredients, on that everyone agrees. Milk,
    Ubet, seltzer.

    The real arguments happen when the discussion turns to
    technique. What goes in first, the milk or the ubet? How
    much of each? Seltzer from a bottle? Seltzer from a siphon?
     
  18. Kilikini

    Kilikini Guest

    "Sheryl Rosen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BC8C771E.49EF7%[email protected]...
    > in article [email protected],
    > kilikini at [email protected] wrote on 3/28/04
    > 11:35 AM:
    >
    > >
    > > "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > message news:[email protected]...
    > >> Pizen wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>> That sounds good, but it is about as Southern as an
    > >>> egg cream.
    > >>
    > >> Argh. I got a craving for an egg cream last week when
    > >> he introduced his Texan girlfriend to one (she tried it
    > >> with trepidation and pronounced it ... Hey, it's good!
    > >> like generations of New Yorkers could be wrong?) ...
    > >> now you had to bring it up again. I must get to the
    > >> store for Fox's U Bet!!!
    > >>
    > >> nancy
    > >
    > > Okay, gotta ask.........What in the hell is an egg
    > > cream? kili
    > >
    > >
    >
    > go here: http://www.foxs-syrups.com/egg_cream.html
    >
    > and read for yourself!!!
    >

    There isn't any egg in it! And what's U Bet? Is that like
    Hershey's? kili
     
  19. Sheryl Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    in article [email protected], kilikini at
    [email protected] wrote on 3/28/04 2:01 PM:

    >
    > "Sheryl Rosen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:BC8C771E.49EF7%[email protected]...
    >> in article [email protected],
    >> kilikini at [email protected] wrote on 3/28/04
    >> 11:35 AM:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >>> message news:[email protected]...
    >>>> Pizen wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> That sounds good, but it is about as Southern as an
    >>>>> egg cream.
    >>>>
    >>>> Argh. I got a craving for an egg cream last week when
    >>>> he introduced his Texan girlfriend to one (she tried it
    >>>> with trepidation and pronounced it ... Hey, it's good!
    >>>> like generations of New Yorkers could be wrong?) ...
    >>>> now you had to bring it up again. I must get to the
    >>>> store for Fox's U Bet!!!
    >>>>
    >>>> nancy
    >>>
    >>> Okay, gotta ask.........What in the hell is an egg
    >>> cream? kili
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >> go here: http://www.foxs-syrups.com/egg_cream.html
    >>
    >> and read for yourself!!!
    >>
    >
    > There isn't any egg in it! And what's U Bet? Is that like
    > Hershey's? kili
    >
    >
    well they are both chocolate syrup.
     
  20. Sheryl Rosen

    Sheryl Rosen Guest

    in article [email protected], BOB at
    [email protected] wrote on 3/28/04 12:47 PM:

    > Sheryl Rosen wrote:
    >> in article [email protected],
    >> kilikini at [email protected] wrote on 3/28/04
    >> 11:35 AM:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >>> message news:[email protected]...
    >>>> Pizen wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> That sounds good, but it is about as Southern as an
    >>>>> egg cream.
    >>>>
    >>>> Argh. I got a craving for an egg cream last week when
    >>>> he introduced his Texan girlfriend to one (she tried it
    >>>> with trepidation and pronounced it ... Hey, it's good!
    >>>> like generations of New Yorkers could be wrong?) ...
    >>>> now you had to bring it up again. I must get to the
    >>>> store for Fox's U Bet!!!
    >>>>
    >>>> nancy
    >>>
    >>> Okay, gotta ask.........What in the hell is an egg
    >>> cream? kili
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >> go here: http://www.foxs-syrups.com/egg_cream.html
    >>
    >> and read for yourself!!!
    >
    > Thanks for that link! I've never seen (or heard of) egg
    > creams except in this newsgroup, and have always (since
    > the first thread I read) wanted to try them. The page says
    > in Florida, I can find "Fox's U Bet" in Publix
    > Supermarkets. I'll have to check. What section of the
    > store would I look in?
    >
    > BOB
    >
    >

    It might be in one of two places. It should be next to
    Hershey's syrup and Nestles Quick, but it could also be in
    the "kosher" aisle.

    This time of year, it might even be by the Passover items.
    Which means it's made with sugar, not corn syrup.
     
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