Help to rebuild endurance

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by Emsi2086, Mar 19, 2019.

  1. Emsi2086

    Emsi2086 New Member

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    Hi there,

    First time posting here - I was hoping someone might have a little advice for me. I used to cycle about 300/450km per week - my rides usually always in Z3 and Z4 apart from rest days. I love being on my bike and I could literally ride everyday huge amounts if my body would allow it. I built up to this 300/450km/week over about 10 weeks (from never cycling beforehand). Then maintained it for a couple months. Then suddenly got Achilles injuries in both feet from what doc says 'overuse injury'. So was off the bike a couple months. And sort of built back up to 300/350km per week after the injury in about 6 weeks. Then maintained for a couple months...and bam, Achilles injuries again. Got fed up, bought a new bike, got a bike fit and stop riding for 5 months. But, now I feel like I'm totally ready and healthy to get riding again. I just don't want to break my my body again. So my question is, how long does have to take to build up tendon strength? Does the below training schedule seem feasible - this is less intense than what I did beforehand.

    Would this sort of training schedule be okay? Week 13 is sort of what I like to do - the right amount of cycling I like to do, my problem is how to get back there without breaking stuff.

    Some notes about me:

    I'm in my early 30s, a girl, have a beautiful full carbon bike etc and all the right gear, HR monitors etc. My bike has been fitted to my body and all that, so that's not a problem anymore. It really is just how intense can my training be... this will be my second season of training (but third year since I started riding due to long breaks because of injuries).

    THANKS SO MUCH!!

    Week 1: easy - 3 rides of 35km, very little climbing, Z3 - Z5
    Week 2: easy - 2 rides of 35 km, very little climbing Z3 - Z5 + 1 ride of 45 km, 1100m of climbing Z3-5
    Week 3 easy - 1 ride of 35 km, very little climbing Z1- Z2 + 2 rides of 45 1100m of climbing Z3-5
    week 4 easy but more climbing - 3 rides of 45km, 1100m of climbing Z3-5
    Week 5 - same as week 4
    Week 6 - 1 ride of 35km, very little climbing, Z1-2 + 3 rides of 45km, 1100m of climbing Z3-5 +1 ride of 100km, 1600m of climbing z3-5
    week 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12: same as week 6
    week 13, 14, 15, 16: 4 rides of 45km, very little climbing, Z1-2 + 4 rides of 45km, 1100m of climbing Z3-5 +1 ride of 100km, 1600m of climbing z3-5
     


  2. phillman5

    phillman5 New Member

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    No expert here, and some of your language (Z ratings for rides) is beyond my comprehension. My only suggestion is to get Greg LeMond's complete book on cycling (I think published sometime in the 90's). Although you say you've had your bike fitted, but my experience is the people doing bike fits have different experience, perspective, and knowledge. LeMond's book has very technical chapters and tables on bike fit. BUT he also spends several pages on pedal stroke, which is the item in the book I got the most out of. (I think you need to use his bike fit to use his pedal stroke). You might want to rethink your pedals and shoes and make sure your cleats are positioned correctly. I'd seek a doctor specializing in cycling to go over your injuries and help pick a shoe and pedal. You might need pedals/shoes with more (or less) freedom (I think they call it float) during the pedal stroke. Also just thinking about it, refer to LeMond's book (and aforementioned doc) and your inseam for the correct size crank arms.
     
  3. BrianNystrom

    BrianNystrom Member

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    It seems obvious from the fact that you keep experiencing the same injury that you're trying to do too much too soon. Tendon/ligament injuries take a long time to heal. You may even need to take some time completely off the bike. I suggest that you back off, keep the intensity very low and concentrate on building base miles that will condition your joints to handle a larger workload. The absolute worst thing you can do is to keep pushing and re-injuring yourself.

    Rather than posting here, find a physical therapist that works with athletes and have them develop a plan for your recovery. Note that the cost of this may be covered by your health insurance. Next, find a good coach who will design a program for you, taking into account your propensity for Achilles injuries.

    I'm sure you don't want to hear this, but your recovery and re-training process could take a year or more. You need to be patient and listen to your body; it will tell you how much it can handle. If you ignore it, you're doomed to repeat the same problems and potentially end up with a permanent debilitating condition. This same advice was given to me 20 years ago by the surgeon who screwed my hip back together after an accident. He said that athletes are often the worst patients because they're very driven and they're used to being in pain, so they push too hard, too soon and often make their injuries worse, and their recovery time much longer. That's the path you seem to be on currently. I listened to his advice and what my body was telling me, I recovered sooner than expected, and haven't had any complications since.

    Please, be smart and above all, patient.
     
  4. Emsi2086

    Emsi2086 New Member

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    Thanks so much for the reply - Z = Zones. I will take a look at his book, sounds like a great buy. Thanks :)
     
  5. Emsi2086

    Emsi2086 New Member

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    Thanks again so much for your reply - you're right. I did actually take a lot of time off the bike (I did only 2 small rides between October last year and first week of March), months and months in total. But you're right, best thing is to work with a coach to build a training plan with an expert. I've got a physio and sport doctor already (only thing is they tend to know what's wrong, or how your current health is, but don't say much more than reduce training or 'gradually' increase training, do these rehab exercises etc without any particular guidance on what this means for on the bike ride, intensity, HR rate, power output, mileage etc) so a coach is a good addition. I was hoping to manage without one because it's super expensive but I think, I probably will re-injure myself without because yes, like most athletes, I am accustomed to pain and niggles during exercise.

    Again thanks so much for helping me make a decision on how to move forward!
     
  6. BRITANY

    BRITANY New Member

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    week 13, 14, 15, 16: 4 rides of 45km, very little climbing, Z1-2 + 4 rides of 45km, 1100m of climbing Z3-5 +1 ride of 100km, 1600m of climbing z3-5
     
  7. BRITANY

    BRITANY New Member

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    No expert here, and some of your language (Z ratings for rides) is beyond my comprehension. My only suggestion is to get Greg L filezilla uc browser rufus eMond's complete book on cycling (I think published sometime in the 90's). Although you say you've had your bike fitted, but my experience is the people doing bike fits have different experience, perspective, and knowledge. LeMond's book has very technical chapters and tables on bike fit. BUT he also spends several pages on pedal stroke, which is the item in the book I got the most out of. (I think you need to use his bike fit to use his pedal stroke). You might want to rethink your pedals and shoes and make sure your cleats are positioned correctly. I'd seek a doctor specializing in cycling to go over your injuries and help pick a shoe and pedal. You might need pedals/shoes with more (or less) freedom (I think they call it float) during the pedal stroke. Also just thinking about it, refer to LeMond's book (and aforementioned doc) and your inseam for the correct size crank arms.
     
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