help, tourer or road bike?



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J

James G

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I had my bike nicked last autumn and i think its about time to invest in a new one. I have only ever
had a mountain bike before, and havent gone more than about 25/30 miles in a day. However I am now
seriously tempted to start going further distances on the road, say 100+ miles in a day. So I need a
bike that is going to be reasonably light and fast on the road, but also comfortable, as i've never
ridden a drop bar bike for any length of time before. I only have ~£350 so is something like the
Dawes Giro 200 suitable for the longer distances, or would I be better off saving up for a Horizon
or getting a second hand tourer? Also would the Giro be suitable for the odd canal towpath? I am
inclined towards a tourer only I want to stay as light as possible.
 
A

Alex Graham

Guest
On Sun, 2 Mar 2003, james g wrote:

> I had my bike nicked last autumn and i think its about time to invest in a new one. I have only
> ever had a mountain bike before, and havent gone more than about 25/30 miles in a day. However I
> am now seriously tempted to start going further distances on the road, say 100+ miles in a day. So
> I need a bike that is going to be reasonably light and fast on the road, but also comfortable, as
> i've never ridden a drop bar bike for any length of time before. I only have ~£350 so is something
> like the Dawes Giro 200 suitable for the longer distances, or would I be better off saving up for
> a Horizon or getting a second hand tourer? Also would the Giro be suitable for the odd canal
> towpath? I am inclined towards a tourer only I want to stay as light as possible.
>
>
Hi James,

I have a 2002 giro 200, and my opinion of the bike is that it is very good value for money (as with
many dawes bikes). I use it for quite a lot of things, except where its likely to get nicked. So in
other words, school run, clubruns (which can be quite long - 70+miles), and light TT-ing, all
without any discomfort.

The thing you need to remember is that its really designed for racing, so its got quite a short
wheelbase so ankle clearance with pannniers isnt great. The rear dropouts are drilled to accept
panniers and mudguards (one set of holes only) as are the front forks. I doubt if canal towpaths are
a good idea on it - it comes with 23mm tyres and youd find it tricky to fit anything wider. The
salmon mudguards go on easily enough, though.

If you want the ability to go on towpaths then I think the horizon is a better choice. However for
road riding and racing the giro 200 is an excellent bike and suits me perfectly. The photo on the
dawes website is a bit **** so if you want to see it fitted with a rack and guards see:

http://alexpg.ath.cx:3353/lights/above_side.jpg http://alexpg.ath.cx:3353/lights/side_view.jpg

All in all, its quite cheap and has quite decent components.

You may be referring to the 2003 model, but if their other 2003 bikes are anything to go by they
will have changed one of the colours and about one other component :)

Hope this helps,

-Alex

--
----------------------+ Alex Graham | [email protected] | ----------------------+
 
L

Luigi De Guzman

Guest
Get the tourer, if your'e going to get a new bicycle.

The tourer, if fitted correctly, will be comfortable over the long miles, not difficult to control,
and lively enough for most noncompetitive uses. It will also fit mudguards, and a carrier, and will
be more useful as a bicycle all around.

You can always get a proper racer when you can afford it, or when you decide that punishing your
body is what you want to do.

-Luigi (my nice bike is a Jamis Aurora. My hack bike is a beat-up old pink-and-black MBK)
 
P

Pete Biggs

Guest
james g wrote:
> I had my bike nicked last autumn and i think its about time to invest in a new one. I have only
> ever had a mountain bike before, and havent gone more than about 25/30 miles in a day. However I
> am now seriously tempted to start going further distances on the road, say 100+ miles in a day. So
> I need a bike that is going to be reasonably light and fast on the road, but also comfortable

Don't be put off by anyone telling you that a road bike can't be comfortable enough. With suitable
tyres, saddle, gears, and stem and bar setup, they are actually far more comfortable overall than
tourers in my experience. (I suspect many people don't accept this because they have not put enough
effort into getting a road bike just right for them). Don't forget the ability to cover more miles
with the same effort is a very important part of the equation. However, I think practical
considerations like the ability to carry loads of luggage and have proper full mudgards are the
factors you need to think about first.

> , as i've never ridden a drop bar bike for any length of time before. I only have ~£350

Ah, those are a couple of reasons _not_ to get a road bike now, then. But that's not to say you
shouldn't on balance. The decision is yours!

> so is something like the Dawes Giro 200 suitable for the longer distances,

I don't think there's enough advantage of a relatively crude and heavy road bike like the 200 over
more practical bikes, so not a good choice for longer distances, imo.

> or would I be better off saving up for a Horizon or getting a second hand tourer?

Or how about a second hand good road bike to discover if you like that type of thing or not - and to
have something better than the Giro 200.

> Also would the Giro be suitable for the odd canal towpath?

It'd be okay (but not great) - if it is only occasionally. 25 or 28c tyres will help.

> I am inclined towards a tourer only I want to stay as light as possible.

Consider "audax" bikes as well.

--
~PB FA: 62cm Ti frame: http://tinyurl.com/6stt
 
J

Jimbob

Guest
"james g" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> "james g" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > I had my bike nicked last autumn and i think its about time to invest in
a
> > new one. I have only ever had a mountain bike before, and havent gone
more
> > than about 25/30 miles in a day. However I am now seriously tempted to
> start
> > going further distances on the road, say 100+ miles in a day. So I need
a
> > bike that is going to be reasonably light and fast on the road, but also comfortable, as i've
> > never ridden a drop bar bike for any length of time before. I only have ~£350 so is something
> > like the Dawes Giro 200
suitable
> > for the longer distances, or would I be better off saving up for a
Horizon
> > or getting a second hand tourer? Also would the Giro be suitable for the
> odd
> > canal towpath? I am inclined towards a tourer only I want to stay as
light
> > as possible.
> >
>
> Thanks for the advice people, I didn't know realise you could fit racks to the Giro 200/300. I
> settled on a Giro 300 in the end as my LBS was doing last years model for £350. I was seriously
> tempted by an Audax though down from £799 to £520!

Well I always say what do the Tour De France boys ride for long distance rides? Yep, racers.

OK they don't have to carry gear, but you don't either for audax rides. They don't moan about lack
of guards or harsh rides either.

So I'm going to do some long 'uns this year on my racer, starting with the Bike Show Ride from
Sheffield to Brum. I do have a triple chainset though!.
 
S

Simon Hay

Guest
JimBob wrote:

> OK they don't have to carry gear, but you don't either for audax rides. They don't moan about lack
> of guards or harsh rides either.

That would be because they're Well 'Ard. Just because it's possible to do it without the above
niceties doesn't mean it isn't preferable to do it with, if your entire livelihood is not centered
around going as fast as possible :)

Simon
 
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