Help - trouble breaking in Speedplay Zero pedals

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Emily, Apr 12, 2005.

  1. Emily

    Emily Guest

    I recently changed from Speedplay X-2 pedals (used them for years) to
    Speedplay Zeros (ti), because I didn't need so much float and found that
    my heels were hitting the crankarms from time to time. I am having a
    terrible time clipping into the Zeros, especially with my first foot. I
    can't clip in at all from a dead stop as I normally do, despite putting
    all my weight into it. Instead, I have to start pedaling without
    clipping in, then I am able to clip in after several attempts. I've
    been riding clipless for several years so am not a newbie at this; are
    these pedals just exceptionally hard to break in?

    They are also harder to clip out of than my X-2s (or the Eggbeater
    Candies I have on my mtb), but I can manage that.

    I am a petite female (5'2", 105 lbs) and just can't seem to get enough
    force to clip in. I love the pedals once I am clipped in, so I do want
    to make this work; I am just not sure how. Are they easier to clip in
    if I set them for more float? Right now I have them set for zero float
    inwards (don't need it since I toe out a bit) and about 3 degrees
    outwards, which seems fine for my knees - I just can't clip in!

    Thanks much,
    Emily
     
    Tags:


  2. "Emily" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I recently changed from Speedplay X-2 pedals (used them for years) to
    >Speedplay Zeros (ti), because I didn't need so much float and found that my
    >heels were hitting the crankarms from time to time. I am having a terrible
    >time clipping into the Zeros, especially with my first foot. I can't clip
    >in at all from a dead stop as I normally do, despite putting all my weight
    >into it. Instead, I have to start pedaling without clipping in, then I am
    >able to clip in after several attempts. I've been riding clipless for
    >several years so am not a newbie at this; are these pedals just
    >exceptionally hard to break in?
    >
    > They are also harder to clip out of than my X-2s (or the Eggbeater Candies
    > I have on my mtb), but I can manage that.
    >
    > I am a petite female (5'2", 105 lbs) and just can't seem to get enough
    > force to clip in. I love the pedals once I am clipped in, so I do want to
    > make this work; I am just not sure how. Are they easier to clip in if I
    > set them for more float? Right now I have them set for zero float inwards
    > (don't need it since I toe out a bit) and about 3 degrees outwards, which
    > seems fine for my knees - I just can't clip in!
    >
    > Thanks much,
    > Emily


    As I understand it, the float and clip in are two separate functions
    unrelated to each other (at least that's what Speedplay's literature says.

    I've ridden Zeros for the past two years. I've found that when I have
    trouble clicking in, it's usually been a placement problem. If it doesn't
    go in on the first push, I lift up my foot off of the pedal and then push
    again. Seems to work. Also, make sure you didn't over-torque the cleat
    when installing it on your shoe. If the cleat doesn't have a flat platform,
    and you crank down on the screws, the metal ring can bend slightly like a
    Pringles chip. That also prevents easy engagement. Another thing to check
    would be to make sure you didn't get the Track version of the cleats. They
    are much tighter.

    HTH, but as always, YMMV
     
  3. Bob Wheeler

    Bob Wheeler Guest

    Emily wrote:
    > I recently changed from Speedplay X-2 pedals (used them for years) to
    > Speedplay Zeros (ti), because I didn't need so much float and found that
    > my heels were hitting the crankarms from time to time. I am having a
    > terrible time clipping into the Zeros, especially with my first foot. I
    > can't clip in at all from a dead stop as I normally do, despite putting
    > all my weight into it. Instead, I have to start pedaling without
    > clipping in, then I am able to clip in after several attempts. I've
    > been riding clipless for several years so am not a newbie at this; are
    > these pedals just exceptionally hard to break in?
    >
    > They are also harder to clip out of than my X-2s (or the Eggbeater
    > Candies I have on my mtb), but I can manage that.
    >
    > I am a petite female (5'2", 105 lbs) and just can't seem to get enough
    > force to clip in. I love the pedals once I am clipped in, so I do want
    > to make this work; I am just not sure how. Are they easier to clip in
    > if I set them for more float? Right now I have them set for zero float
    > inwards (don't need it since I toe out a bit) and about 3 degrees
    > outwards, which seems fine for my knees - I just can't clip in!
    >
    > Thanks much,
    > Emily


    The adjustment of Speedplay's is difficult. I had zero's on my bikes for
    about a year, and finally replaced them with SPD's. It is of course
    possible that I never got things right, but I did go through several
    cleats and several adjustments in the attempt. The design requires a
    nice adjustment of the screws which are held in place by Loctite, rather
    than screw pressure. I was never able to clip in from a dead stop, and
    had a lot of trouble otherwise. It was essential to lubricate the cleats
    for each ride with White Lightning, and even then it was sometimes hard
    to clip in. I finally decided that they were more fuss than they were
    worth. (Anyone want to buy some cheap? I have three pairs.)

    --
    Bob Wheeler --- http://www.bobwheeler.com/
    ECHIP, Inc. ---
    Randomness comes in bunches.
     
  4. Emily wrote:
    > I recently changed from Speedplay X-2 pedals (used them for years) to
    > Speedplay Zeros (ti), because I didn't need so much float and found that
    > my heels were hitting the crankarms from time to time. I am having a
    > terrible time clipping into the Zeros, especially with my first foot. I
    > can't clip in at all from a dead stop as I normally do, despite putting
    > all my weight into it. Instead, I have to start pedaling without
    > clipping in, then I am able to clip in after several attempts. I've
    > been riding clipless for several years so am not a newbie at this; are
    > these pedals just exceptionally hard to break in?
    >
    > They are also harder to clip out of than my X-2s (or the Eggbeater
    > Candies I have on my mtb), but I can manage that.
    >
    > I am a petite female (5'2", 105 lbs) and just can't seem to get enough
    > force to clip in. I love the pedals once I am clipped in, so I do want
    > to make this work; I am just not sure how. Are they easier to clip in
    > if I set them for more float? Right now I have them set for zero float
    > inwards (don't need it since I toe out a bit) and about 3 degrees
    > outwards, which seems fine for my knees - I just can't clip in!
    >
    > Thanks much,
    > Emily


    First enssure you have the correct shim in and the cleat is very flat on
    the bottom of the shoe. If it is bent at all, use the other shim to
    attempt to get the cleat flat. using extra shims may help as well. A
    flat cleat is essential to proper use of Zeros.
     
  5. Pat

    Pat Guest

    "Emily" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    : I recently changed from Speedplay X-2 pedals (used them for years) to
    : Speedplay Zeros (ti), because I didn't need so much float and found that
    : my heels were hitting the crankarms from time to time. I am having a
    : terrible time clipping into the Zeros, especially with my first foot. I
    : can't clip in at all from a dead stop as I normally do, despite putting
    : all my weight into it. Instead, I have to start pedaling without
    : clipping in, then I am able to clip in after several attempts. I've
    : been riding clipless for several years so am not a newbie at this; are
    : these pedals just exceptionally hard to break in?

    I am having the same problem with my new Speedplay Zeros. I complained about
    it at the LBS yesterday evening and was told to "back off" the tightness of
    the 4 screws that hold the cleat to the bottom of the shoe. Supposedly, this
    allows the springs to have more looseness. I haven't tried it yet, but I
    plan to do it this evening. For me, the SPD pedals are a non-started because
    of immediate "hot foot" problems. I changed from Looks to Speedplay
    primarily for the float.

    Pat in TX
     
  6. > First enssure you have the correct shim in and the cleat is very flat on
    > the bottom of the shoe. If it is bent at all, use the other shim to
    > attempt to get the cleat flat. using extra shims may help as well. A flat
    > cleat is essential to proper use of Zeros.


    Agreed. But in general, don't you see more issues with cleats, and the ease
    of getting into them, with zeros than with X2s? We certainly see a lot more
    broken cleat springs with zeros, and in general, I don't recommend them for
    lighter-weight riders.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


    "Qui si parla Campagnolo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Emily wrote:
    >> I recently changed from Speedplay X-2 pedals (used them for years) to
    >> Speedplay Zeros (ti), because I didn't need so much float and found that
    >> my heels were hitting the crankarms from time to time. I am having a
    >> terrible time clipping into the Zeros, especially with my first foot. I
    >> can't clip in at all from a dead stop as I normally do, despite putting
    >> all my weight into it. Instead, I have to start pedaling without
    >> clipping in, then I am able to clip in after several attempts. I've been
    >> riding clipless for several years so am not a newbie at this; are these
    >> pedals just exceptionally hard to break in?
    >>
    >> They are also harder to clip out of than my X-2s (or the Eggbeater
    >> Candies I have on my mtb), but I can manage that.
    >>
    >> I am a petite female (5'2", 105 lbs) and just can't seem to get enough
    >> force to clip in. I love the pedals once I am clipped in, so I do want
    >> to make this work; I am just not sure how. Are they easier to clip in if
    >> I set them for more float? Right now I have them set for zero float
    >> inwards (don't need it since I toe out a bit) and about 3 degrees
    >> outwards, which seems fine for my knees - I just can't clip in!
    >>
    >> Thanks much,
    >> Emily

    >
    > First enssure you have the correct shim in and the cleat is very flat on
    > the bottom of the shoe. If it is bent at all, use the other shim to
    > attempt to get the cleat flat. using extra shims may help as well. A flat
    > cleat is essential to proper use of Zeros.
     
  7. Emily

    Emily Guest

    Thanks to everyone who has responded to my question so far. My husband
    messed with my cleats today. He first moved the position of them on my
    shoes to make sure that they were directly on the ball of my foot (they
    were slightly to the outside so not as well aligned as they should have
    been). He discovered that the screws that attach them to my shoes were
    a little loose and tightened them up. He then clipped each one in and
    out of the pedal about 100 times (the things we do for love!) It's too
    cold and wet to ride tonight, but I did try clipping in several times in
    the garage and was able to do it (even from a dead stop) at last. The
    second foot went in even easier. The first foot (left) definitely
    required some force, but was not impossible like it was when I rode this
    weekend. So maybe things will be better from here on out. :)

    I do wish I'd known beforehand that these pedals weren't recommended for
    lighter riders, but now that I've spent the cash, I am determined to
    make them work!

    Thanks again - what a helpful group this is!

    Emily
     
  8. Mike Jacoubowsky wrote:
    >>First enssure you have the correct shim in and the cleat is very flat on
    >>the bottom of the shoe. If it is bent at all, use the other shim to
    >>attempt to get the cleat flat. using extra shims may help as well. A flat
    >>cleat is essential to proper use of Zeros.

    >
    >
    > Agreed. But in general, don't you see more issues with cleats, and the ease
    > of getting into them, with zeros than with X2s? We certainly see a lot more
    > broken cleat springs with zeros, and in general, I don't recommend them for
    > lighter-weight riders.


    yes and I think because the pedal is 'locked' into the spring of the
    Zero cleat where it just engages the spring of the X-2.
    >
    > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    > www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
    >
     
  9. Emily wrote:
    > Thanks to everyone who has responded to my question so far. My husband
    > messed with my cleats today. He first moved the position of them on my
    > shoes to make sure that they were directly on the ball of my foot (they
    > were slightly to the outside so not as well aligned as they should have
    > been). He discovered that the screws that attach them to my shoes were
    > a little loose and tightened them up. He then clipped each one in and
    > out of the pedal about 100 times (the things we do for love!) It's too
    > cold and wet to ride tonight, but I did try clipping in several times in
    > the garage and was able to do it (even from a dead stop) at last. The
    > second foot went in even easier. The first foot (left) definitely
    > required some force, but was not impossible like it was when I rode this
    > weekend. So maybe things will be better from here on out. :)
    >
    > I do wish I'd known beforehand that these pedals weren't recommended for
    > lighter riders, but now that I've spent the cash, I am determined to
    > make them work!


    Whoever told you this fairy tale? Because of the diffuculty to get into
    them? I think the issue is smaller shoes and the resulting roundness of
    the shoe rather than weight. Even a small person, weighing in the buck
    ..05 range can exert enough force to get into pedals.

    >
    > Thanks again - what a helpful group this is!
    >
    > Emily
     
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