Help with Fixed Gear/Single Speed Project

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by The Eye, Sep 19, 2004.

  1. The Eye

    The Eye Guest

    I have a 1978 Schwinn Traveler III.

    I am begging my first bike project and I want to convert this to a fixed
    gear or a single speed ride.

    I have started by disassembling the bike and installing new BB that was very
    badly needed. That went well using a Shimano BB-UN53 122 cm.

    I am stopped now for the lack of the proper tool to remove the old cassette.
    Part of my plan is to begin building my tool box by buying the tools needed
    for this project.

    Another challenge is the crank does not allow me to remove the larger
    sprocket from the crank, it is a one piece unit and has 59 teeth. From what
    I have read this is too big for fixed gearing?

    1) Would I be able to find a single speed gear to work with the 59 tooth
    front Sprocket?

    2) If I go fixed gear, any suggestions on the crank and the rear
    wheel/sprocket choices.

    Thanks,

    Anthony White
     
    Tags:


  2. The Eye wrote:

    > I have a 1978 Schwinn Traveler III.
    >
    > I am begging my first bike project and I want to convert this to a fixed
    > gear or a single speed ride.
    >
    > I have started by disassembling the bike and installing new BB that was very
    > badly needed. That went well using a Shimano BB-UN53 122 cm.
    >
    > I am stopped now for the lack of the proper tool to remove the old cassette.
    > Part of my plan is to begin building my tool box by buying the tools needed
    > for this project.


    You need a Shimano lockring tool (but the Shimano freewheel removers
    work in a pinch) and a chain whip. For a one-off job try holding the
    cassette in place using the bike's chain with a suitable rod stuck
    through the links (like a small screwdriver) while you undo the
    lockring. It's worked for me. Or take the wheel to a bike shop.

    You're going to have major chainline problems with a 122mm bottom
    bracket. What you should do is find a BB length that puts the big 59T
    (really? that's massive) chainring as-near-as-dammit 42mm from the
    bike's centreline, assuming the frame has a 120mm spacing at the rear.
    Then you'll need a 22T sprocket to get a nice gear of around 70".
    E.A.I. are extremely nice sprockets - Sheldon sells them - but there are
    cheaper ones around. The 59/22 combination will be bigger than most
    people's 42/16 or 48/18 but will be very durable and look rather cool.

    I would strongly recommend having a rear wheel built using a proper
    track hub. These need not be expensive. A proper track wheel is
    dishless and can take a lockring to hold the sprocket in place.
     
  3. The Eye wrote:

    > I have a 1978 Schwinn Traveler III.
    >
    > I am begging my first bike project and I want to convert this to a fixed
    > gear or a single speed ride.
    >
    > I have started by disassembling the bike and installing new BB that was very
    > badly needed. That went well using a Shimano BB-UN53 122 cm.
    >
    > I am stopped now for the lack of the proper tool to remove the old cassette.
    > Part of my plan is to begin building my tool box by buying the tools needed
    > for this project.


    I'd be very surprised if that bike uses a cassette-type hub.

    See: http://sheldonbrown.com/free-l7
    >
    > Another challenge is the crank does not allow me to remove the larger
    > sprocket from the crank, it is a one piece unit and has 59 teeth. From what
    > I have read this is too big for fixed gearing?


    Count the teeth again. Much more likely to be a 52.

    > 1) Would I be able to find a single speed gear to work with the 59 tooth
    > front Sprocket?


    For cheap fixed-gear conversions, you want to use the inner chainring,
    for two reasons:

    A: It will be hard to get the chainline right using the outer chainring.

    2. The big fixed sprockets or freewheels you would need are more
    expensive than smaller ones, and singlespeed freewheels in appropriate
    sizes are

    > 2) If I go fixed gear, any suggestions on the crank and the rear
    > wheel/sprocket choices.


    For rolling terrain, fixed gear, I generally recommend something around
    a 5.8 gain ratio*. If you live in the flatlands, maybe about a 6.2

    For a freewheeling setup, somewhere around 5, but fixed is a lot more fun.

    To calculate gain ratio options for the actual chainring sizes you have,
    see my online gear calculator:

    http://sheldonbrown.com/gears

    Sheldon "Nothing Ventured, Nothing Gained" Brown
    +---------------------------------------------+
    | Do not needlessly endanger your lives |
    | until I give you the signal. |
    | --Dwight D. Eisenhower |
    +---------------------------------------------+
    *Gain ratio is a new system for measuring bicycle gearing.
    It is explained in detail on my Web site at:
    http://sheldonbrown.com/gain

    Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
    Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041
    http://harriscyclery.com
    Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  4. The Eye wrote:

    > I have a 1978 Schwinn Traveler III.
    >
    > I am begging my first bike project and I want to convert this to a fixed
    > gear or a single speed ride.
    >
    > I have started by disassembling the bike and installing new BB that was very
    > badly needed. That went well using a Shimano BB-UN53 122 cm.
    >
    > I am stopped now for the lack of the proper tool to remove the old cassette.
    > Part of my plan is to begin building my tool box by buying the tools needed
    > for this project.


    I'd be very surprised if that bike uses a cassette-type hub.

    See: http://sheldonbrown.com/free-k7
    >
    > Another challenge is the crank does not allow me to remove the larger
    > sprocket from the crank, it is a one piece unit and has 59 teeth. From what
    > I have read this is too big for fixed gearing?


    Count the teeth again. Much more likely to be a 52.

    > 1) Would I be able to find a single speed gear to work with the 59 tooth
    > front Sprocket?


    For cheap fixed-gear conversions, you want to use the inner chainring,
    for two reasons:

    A: It will be hard to get the chainline right using the outer chainring.

    2. The big fixed sprockets or freewheels you would need are more
    expensive than smaller ones, and singlespeed freewheels in appropriate
    sizes are

    > 2) If I go fixed gear, any suggestions on the crank and the rear
    > wheel/sprocket choices.


    For rolling terrain, fixed gear, I generally recommend something around
    a 5.8 gain ratio*. If you live in the flatlands, maybe about a 6.2

    For a freewheeling setup, somewhere around 5, but fixed is a lot more fun.

    To calculate gain ratio options for the actual chainring sizes you have,
    see my online gear calculator:

    http://sheldonbrown.com/gears

    Sheldon "Nothing Ventured, Nothing Gained" Brown
    +---------------------------------------------+
    | Do not needlessly endanger your lives |
    | until I give you the signal. |
    | --Dwight D. Eisenhower |
    +---------------------------------------------+
    *Gain ratio is a new system for measuring bicycle gearing.
    It is explained in detail on my Web site at:
    http://sheldonbrown.com/gain

    Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
    Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041
    http://harriscyclery.com
    Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
     
  5. Jeff Wills

    Jeff Wills Guest

    "The Eye" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have a 1978 Schwinn Traveler III.
    >
    > I am begging my first bike project and I want to convert this to a fixed
    > gear or a single speed ride.
    >
    > I have started by disassembling the bike and installing new BB that was very
    > badly needed. That went well using a Shimano BB-UN53 122 cm.
    >
    > I am stopped now for the lack of the proper tool to remove the old cassette.
    > Part of my plan is to begin building my tool box by buying the tools needed
    > for this project.
    >


    This is not a cassette- it's a freewheel. If you're planning on
    maintaining the bike as a single-speed or fixed gear, just take the
    wheel to a bike shop. Most will remove the freewheel for a minimal
    charge. (It should be a Shimano splined 14-28 tooth 5-speed- very
    common.)

    > Another challenge is the crank does not allow me to remove the larger
    > sprocket from the crank, it is a one piece unit and has 59 teeth. From what
    > I have read this is too big for fixed gearing?
    >


    That's barely believeable. The Traveler III bikes came with 52-39
    tooth Sugino or Silstar cranks. A 59 tooth chainring would be a custom
    job- and I can't recall many chainrings for *any* crank coming with 59
    teeth- 58 or 60 would be much more believeable.

    Beyond that, Zog's ideas on gearing and bottom brackets apply.

    Beyond *that*, the Traveler III is an excellent basis for a
    single/fixed conversion.

    Jeff
     
  6. The Eye

    The Eye Guest

    Jeff:

    Thanks for your reply.

    I am learning as I go. and am wondering what is the difference between a
    free wheel and a cassette?

    My thought is that a free wheel allows coasting and a cassette is the group
    of sprockets?

    You are right about the crank. The larger gear is 52 and the smaller is 39

    Thanks

    Anthony White


    "Jeff Wills" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "The Eye" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >> I have a 1978 Schwinn Traveler III.
    >>
    >> I am begging my first bike project and I want to convert this to a fixed
    >> gear or a single speed ride.
    >>
    >> I have started by disassembling the bike and installing new BB that was
    >> very
    >> badly needed. That went well using a Shimano BB-UN53 122 cm.
    >>
    >> I am stopped now for the lack of the proper tool to remove the old
    >> cassette.
    >> Part of my plan is to begin building my tool box by buying the tools
    >> needed
    >> for this project.
    >>

    >
    > This is not a cassette- it's a freewheel. If you're planning on
    > maintaining the bike as a single-speed or fixed gear, just take the
    > wheel to a bike shop. Most will remove the freewheel for a minimal
    > charge. (It should be a Shimano splined 14-28 tooth 5-speed- very
    > common.)
    >
    >> Another challenge is the crank does not allow me to remove the larger
    >> sprocket from the crank, it is a one piece unit and has 59 teeth. From
    >> what
    >> I have read this is too big for fixed gearing?
    >>

    >
    > That's barely believeable. The Traveler III bikes came with 52-39
    > tooth Sugino or Silstar cranks. A 59 tooth chainring would be a custom
    > job- and I can't recall many chainrings for *any* crank coming with 59
    > teeth- 58 or 60 would be much more believeable.
    >
    > Beyond that, Zog's ideas on gearing and bottom brackets apply.
    >
    > Beyond *that*, the Traveler III is an excellent basis for a
    > single/fixed conversion.
    >
    > Jeff
     
  7. The Eye

    The Eye Guest

    What is the difference between a cassette and a freewheel?

    Thanks

    Anthony White

    "Sheldon Brown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > The Eye wrote:
    >
    >> I have a 1978 Schwinn Traveler III.
    >>
    >> I am begging my first bike project and I want to convert this to a fixed
    >> gear or a single speed ride.
    >>
    >> I have started by disassembling the bike and installing new BB that was
    >> very badly needed. That went well using a Shimano BB-UN53 122 cm.
    >>
    >> I am stopped now for the lack of the proper tool to remove the old
    >> cassette. Part of my plan is to begin building my tool box by buying the
    >> tools needed for this project.

    >
    > I'd be very surprised if that bike uses a cassette-type hub.
    >
    > See: http://sheldonbrown.com/free-k7
    >>
    >> Another challenge is the crank does not allow me to remove the larger
    >> sprocket from the crank, it is a one piece unit and has 59 teeth. From
    >> what I have read this is too big for fixed gearing?

    >
    > Count the teeth again. Much more likely to be a 52.
    >
    >> 1) Would I be able to find a single speed gear to work with the 59 tooth
    >> front Sprocket?

    >
    > For cheap fixed-gear conversions, you want to use the inner chainring, for
    > two reasons:
    >
    > A: It will be hard to get the chainline right using the outer chainring.
    >
    > 2. The big fixed sprockets or freewheels you would need are more expensive
    > than smaller ones, and singlespeed freewheels in appropriate sizes are
    >
    >> 2) If I go fixed gear, any suggestions on the crank and the rear
    >> wheel/sprocket choices.

    >
    > For rolling terrain, fixed gear, I generally recommend something around a
    > 5.8 gain ratio*. If you live in the flatlands, maybe about a 6.2
    >
    > For a freewheeling setup, somewhere around 5, but fixed is a lot more fun.
    >
    > To calculate gain ratio options for the actual chainring sizes you have,
    > see my online gear calculator:
    >
    > http://sheldonbrown.com/gears
    >
    > Sheldon "Nothing Ventured, Nothing Gained" Brown
    > +---------------------------------------------+
    > | Do not needlessly endanger your lives |
    > | until I give you the signal. |
    > | --Dwight D. Eisenhower |
    > +---------------------------------------------+
    > *Gain ratio is a new system for measuring bicycle gearing.
    > It is explained in detail on my Web site at:
    > http://sheldonbrown.com/gain
    >
    > Harris Cyclery, West Newton, Massachusetts
    > Phone 617-244-9772 FAX 617-244-1041
    > http://harriscyclery.com
    > Hard-to-find parts shipped Worldwide
    > http://captainbike.com http://sheldonbrown.com
    >
     
  8. Tom Paterson

    Tom Paterson Guest

  9. Zog The Undeniable <[email protected]> wrote:
    : The Eye wrote:

    :> I have a 1978 Schwinn Traveler III.
    :>
    :> I am begging my first bike project and I want to convert this to a fixed
    :> gear or a single speed ride.
    :>
    :> I have started by disassembling the bike and installing new BB that was very
    :> badly needed. That went well using a Shimano BB-UN53 122 cm.

    If you still have the old BB you may be able to use it's lockring on your
    rear hub for converting it for fixed gear use. The threading on some BBs
    is the same as the freewheel threading.

    :> I am stopped now for the lack of the proper tool to remove the old cassette.
    :> Part of my plan is to begin building my tool box by buying the tools needed
    :> for this project.

    : You need a Shimano lockring tool (but the Shimano freewheel removers
    : work in a pinch) and a chain whip. For a one-off job try holding the
    : cassette in place using the bike's chain with a suitable rod stuck
    : through the links (like a small screwdriver) while you undo the
    : lockring. It's worked for me. Or take the wheel to a bike shop.

    : You're going to have major chainline problems with a 122mm bottom
    : bracket. What you should do is find a BB length that puts the big 59T
    : (really? that's massive) chainring as-near-as-dammit 42mm from the
    : bike's centreline, assuming the frame has a 120mm spacing at the rear.

    When I did this I had to take a hammer to the chainstay and flatten it a bit
    to get some clearance for the chainring. Not sure if that's a good idea,
    but it's held up so far and the chainline's about perfect.

    - mark
     
  10. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Mon, 20 Sep 2004 18:14:10 -0400, "The Eye"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Jeff:
    >
    >Thanks for your reply.
    >
    >I am learning as I go. and am wondering what is the difference between a
    >free wheel and a cassette?
    >
    >My thought is that a free wheel allows coasting and a cassette is the group
    >of sprockets?


    Freewheel: A group of sprockets on a threaded hub with an enclosed
    ratchet pawl mechanism, generally only supplied as a complete
    assembly.

    Cassette: A group of sprockets which slides on to the splined
    freehub, and is supplied separately from the hub which contains the
    ratcheting mechanism.

    Anything with 5 sprockets is almost always going to be a freewheel.
    At 6 sprockets, it's still most likely a freewheel. At 7, it could go
    either way, but at 8, it's more likely to be a cassette.
    --
    Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
    Some gardening required to reply via email.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
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