Help with getting steel fork threaded and aligned in Bay Area?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Al Russo, Mar 28, 2006.

  1. Al Russo

    Al Russo Guest

    Does anyone have a recommendation for someone located in the Bay Area
    (Califfornia) who would be really expert at aligning a steel fork? The
    forks haven't been crashed - just a bit off-centered (it looks like one of
    the dropouts may be 1 - 2 mm higher than the other) and pulls very slightly.
    Also, I'm thinking of changing the setup to a threaded steered (currently
    threadless), and it would be great if the same person had the tools to do
    the threading as well.

    Thanks so much in advance for any recommendations anyone has!! I really
    appreciate it.
     
    Tags:


  2. Al Russo wrote:
    > Does anyone have a recommendation for someone located in the Bay Area
    > (Califfornia) who would be really expert at aligning a steel fork?



    I have heard good things, albeit all second hand, about the frame work
    at Shaw's in Santa Clara.

    www.shawscycles.com (I think that's right, if not, they'll be in the
    phone book)



    > The
    > forks haven't been crashed - just a bit off-centered (it looks like one of
    > the dropouts may be 1 - 2 mm higher than the other) and pulls very slightly.
    > Also, I'm thinking of changing the setup to a threaded steered (currently
    > threadless), and it would be great if the same person had the tools to do
    > the threading as well.
    >
    > Thanks so much in advance for any recommendations anyone has!! I really
    > appreciate it.
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Ozark Bicycle" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Al Russo wrote:
    > > Does anyone have a recommendation for someone located in the Bay Area
    > > (Califfornia) who would be really expert at aligning a steel fork?

    >
    >
    > I have heard good things, albeit all second hand, about the frame work
    > at Shaw's in Santa Clara.
    >
    > www.shawscycles.com (I think that's right, if not, they'll be in the
    > phone book)


    > > The
    > > forks haven't been crashed - just a bit off-centered (it looks like one of
    > > the dropouts may be 1 - 2 mm higher than the other) and pulls very slightly.


    It must be said that re-setting a steel fork is about the easiest frame
    repair possible. Any shop competent enough to own a dropout alignment
    tool (I have a Park) can probably handle a resettable fork fairly
    quickly.

    If the dropouts are actually different heights, it could get tricky: the
    easiest solution is probably filing the lower of the two dropouts. I
    don't think most forks would take well to trying to resquare the
    relationship between the legs and the crown.

    > > Also, I'm thinking of changing the setup to a threaded steered (currently
    > > threadless), and it would be great if the same person had the tools to do
    > > the threading as well.


    Why? There may be good reasons to change to a threaded steerer, but
    threadless connections are generally stronger. Unless you are looking
    for a dramatic bar-height increase or want the threaded look, it's
    probably not a good idea.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau [email protected] http://www.wiredcola.com/
    "I don't want kids who are thinking about going into mathematics
    to think that they have to take drugs to succeed." -Paul Erdos
     
  4. Dan

    Dan Guest

    Try posting to the local newsgroup ba.bicycles


    Al Russo wrote:
    > Does anyone have a recommendation for someone located in the Bay Area
    > (Califfornia) who would be really expert at aligning a steel fork? The
    > forks haven't been crashed - just a bit off-centered (it looks like one of
    > the dropouts may be 1 - 2 mm higher than the other) and pulls very slightly.
    > Also, I'm thinking of changing the setup to a threaded steered (currently
    > threadless), and it would be great if the same person had the tools to do
    > the threading as well.
    >
    > Thanks so much in advance for any recommendations anyone has!! I really
    > appreciate it.
    >
    >
     
  5. In article
    <[email protected]>,
    "Al Russo" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Does anyone have a recommendation for someone located in the Bay Area
    > (Califfornia) who would be really expert at aligning a steel fork? The
    > forks haven't been crashed - just a bit off-centered (it looks like one of
    > the dropouts may be 1 - 2 mm higher than the other) and pulls very slightly.
    > Also, I'm thinking of changing the setup to a threaded steered (currently
    > threadless), and it would be great if the same person had the tools to do
    > the threading as well.
    >
    > Thanks so much in advance for any recommendations anyone has!! I really
    > appreciate it.


    Ed Litton in Richmond. 510-237-1132.
    Specializes in fitting, building, and repairing.
    Collection of bicycles, new and old, his and others.

    --
    Michael Press
     
  6. Al Russo wrote:
    > Does anyone have a recommendation for someone located in the Bay Area
    > (Califfornia) who would be really expert at aligning a steel fork? The
    > forks haven't been crashed - just a bit off-centered (it looks
    > like one of the dropouts may be 1 - 2 mm higher than the other) and
    > pulls very slightly. Also, I'm thinking of changing the setup to a
    > threaded steered (currently threadless), and it would be great if the
    > same person had the tools to do the threading as well.
    >
    > Thanks so much in advance for any recommendations anyone has!! I
    > really appreciate it.


    A threadless steerer of any material should never be threaded... there's not
    enough material to do so safely. The steerer should be replaced.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  7. philcycles

    philcycles Guest

    Quoted text:
    Does anyone have a recommendation for someone located in the Bay Area
    (Califfornia) who would be really expert at aligning a steel fork? The
    forks haven't been crashed - just a bit off-centered (it looks like one
    of
    the dropouts may be 1 - 2 mm higher than the other) and pulls very
    slightly.
    Also, I'm thinking of changing the setup to a threaded steered
    (currently
    threadless), and it would be great if the same person had the tools to
    do
    the threading as well.

    If the wheel is canted filing the DO will do the job-it's easy with the
    right filke. I use a chain saw sharpening file that's just the right
    diameter. As for threading your threadless steerer, it really won't
    work. New fork or new steerer.
    Phil Brown
     
  8. Scott

    Scott Guest

    Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:

    >
    > A threadless steerer of any material should never be threaded... there's not
    > enough material to do so safely. The steerer should be replaced.
    >
    > --
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training


    That's not always true. The WoundUp fork w/ 1" threadless steel
    steerer uses the exact same steerer tube as their threaded model, they
    just don't thread it.

    Can't speak for other brands, but as long as you're talking about steel
    steerer tubes, its hard to imagine they used a different, thinner tube
    for their threadless models. Most people looking for forks w/ steel
    steerers aren't concerned about the weight.
     
  9. Scott wrote:
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> A threadless steerer of any material should never be threaded...
    >> there's not enough material to do so safely. The steerer should be
    >> replaced.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Phil, Squid-in-Training

    >
    > That's not always true. The WoundUp fork w/ 1" threadless steel
    > steerer uses the exact same steerer tube as their threaded model, they
    > just don't thread it.
    >
    > Can't speak for other brands, but as long as you're talking about
    > steel steerer tubes, its hard to imagine they used a different,
    > thinner tube for their threadless models. Most people looking for
    > forks w/ steel steerers aren't concerned about the weight.


    I was going to follow up my post with "Having said that, I'd thread a steel
    threadless steerer, but YMMV." I was attempting to dodge the ensuing
    professional responsibility posts that would invariably follow.
    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  10. > Does anyone have a recommendation for someone located in the Bay Area
    > (Califfornia) who would be really expert at aligning a steel fork? The
    > forks haven't been crashed - just a bit off-centered (it looks like one of
    > the dropouts may be 1 - 2 mm higher than the other) and pulls very
    > slightly. Also, I'm thinking of changing the setup to a threaded steered
    > (currently threadless), and it would be great if the same person had the
    > tools to do the threading as well.
    >
    > Thanks so much in advance for any recommendations anyone has!! I really
    > appreciate it.


    Dumb question time. If the fork is both off-center *and* has dropouts of
    differing heights, is this really a product you want to put more work into?
    New steel replacement forks aren't that expensive, and I've yet to see
    common generic steel forks (which we buy from QBP as needed) arrive looking
    as bad as what you describe.

    If this bike has never been crashed, and the dropout offset can be verified,
    you might consider checking to see if it's covered under warranty as a
    manufacturing defect.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
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